The Zodiac Signs as Bad Habits

Aries: Interrupting others

Taurus: Sleeping in

Gemini: Slouching

Cancer: Nail-biting

Leo: Gambling

Virgo: Perfectionism

Libra: Lying in order to please others

Scorpio: Procrastination

Sagittarius: Cracking knuckles

Capricorn: Focusing on a mobile device rather than another person

Aquarius: Use of slang

Pisces: Chewing on writing utensils

Crusch Karsten’s Wind Indication Charm & Glamour

Originally posted by tsugumi

[Image: GIF of Crusch Karsten from Re:Zero Kara Hajimeru Isekai Seikatsu. She has donned her armor and brandishes her sword while delivering a speech. Felix Argyle and Wilhelm Van Astrea stand at her side in a large castle chamber.]

In the anime Re:Zero, the supporting character Crusch Karsten is gifted with the ability of Wind Indication. This allows her to read even the most subtle of winds to detect otherwise invisible things, including others’ dishonesty and other veiled emotions. Such a gift makes her a force to be reckoned with at the negotiations table.

This spell seeks to mimic her power, as well as channel Karsten’s commanding yet enthralling personality. It aids its caster in decrypting others’ speech and body language, especially when vague; discerning between truth and lies; and being assertive and persuasive in one’s own words and actions.  

Materials

  • sachet or materials for similar pouch; spell container
  • Queen of Swords card from a Tarot deck / OR queen chess piece; archetypal representation
  • fake feathers; symbol of air element
  • sodalite; for speech, perception, & aid in conflict
  • carnelian; for confidence, social situations, & willpower
  • hematite; for focus, logic, & trust
  • head of a dandelion with seeds; symbol of air element
  • (optional) paper & writing utensil
  • (optional) your voice

Procedure

1. On a day with a light breeze, go outdoors and establish a workspace, laying out your materials. Take care with the dandelion; it’s important that it has most of its seeds still attached.

2. Arrange the fake feathers and stones around the Tarot card or chess piece as you see fit. I suggest placing the hematite on the top of the card to resemble a raised sword.

3. Take some time to observe the wind around you. Listen to the whispers it lures out of tree leaves. Be the audience to the dance it leads with the flowers. Pay keen attention to the scents it whisks under your nose. Feel the tickle that comes as it tugs at your skin. See if you can’t predict where the gale will pick up next.

4. As you increase your sensitivity to the wind, think on any circumstances that may have led you to needing this spell. You can lay your hands on the Tarot card or chess piece if this helps you to focus. Some questions to ask yourself include:

  • Whose words slip out of your grasp and leave you confused? 
  • Who blurs truth and lie with a tone drenched in sarcasm? 
  • Who needs convincing? 
  • Why do you need to amplify your voice like this?

5. When you feel ready, recite the following chant. You may do this mentally, verbally, or in writing.

Let me correct you on one thing.
I can tell if you throw a feint.
The wind breaks your facade,
It tells if you’re a fraud,
And aids me in reading between each line.

Let me correct you on one thing.
There’s truth in my speech and doings.
The wind shows my resolve,
It clears away all qualms,
And leaves no room for misunderstanding.

Let me correct you on one thing.
I am the victor of this Game.

6. Once you’re done with the chant, focus on your goal(s) and send the dandelion seeds off on the breeze. You can dislodge them however you see fit. 

7. Gather the feathers and stones – and any stray dandelion seeds that may’ve stuck around – and put them in the sachet. If you used the chess piece, you can add that as well. 

8. Carry the sachet on your person for it to take effect. If you must recharge it, tie it up securely somewhere on a windy day for the breeze to empower it.

“We are each of us—every single one of us—meant to be a lens for truths that we ourselves cannot see. ‘The system cannot include the systematizer,’ Kierkegaard once said, a clunky but accurate formulation of a problem that applies even to people who don’t have a philosophical bone in their bodies. Our lives burn up, and our minds within them, and all that we have sought so hard to retain in art or durable projects or familial memory. But to live in faith is to live toward a truth that we can but dimly sense, if at all, and to die in faith is to leave an afterimage whose dimensions and meanings we could never even have guessed at. Something of us—something most us, and least us—is saved and made available for others. This is as true of the politician as it is of the poet, as true of the teacher or the preacher, the mother or the father, as it is of a Danish philosopher.”

Christian Wiman, from “A Million Little Oblivions,” My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer (Farrar, Straus, & Giroux, 2013)