literature meme [1/3 genres]

“While the South is hardly Christ-centered, it is most certainly Christ-haunted.” - Flannery O'Connor

‘Common themes in Southern Gothic literature include deeply flawed, disturbing or eccentric characters who may or may not dabble in hoodoo, ambivalent gender roles and decayed or derelict settings, grotesque situations, and other sinister events relating to or coming from poverty, alienation, crime and violence.’

You call yourself a free spirit, a ‘wild thing,’ and you’re terrified somebody’s gonna stick you in a cage. Well baby, you’re already in that cage. You built it yourself…It’s wherever you go. Because no matter where you run, you just end up running into yourself.

Matty: Everything being black and white kind of detaches it from reality. When we initially wanted to put things in black and white, it meant that we weren’t as exposed as people, ‘cause like what we’ve spoken about before, it’s a very personal endeavor, something which we weren’t too comfortable being really judged on. So we kind of detached it from reality, and like I said before, we were aware that our music’s quite- It leans on pop sensibilities, so it’s nice to have something that juxtaposes that. And I look better in black and white. I don’t really like color that much, and I like black and white - it’s simple…
Girl off camera: Like you! (to Matty) Look at what she’s wearing!
Girl on camera: They take a mick out of me all the time 'cause I wear black all the time. (they highfive)
Matty: Truman Capote said that when you’re in your twenties or whenever you should pick a look and you should stick with it ‘cause you’ll forever be timeless. And this is my look now, forever.

You call yourself a free spirit, a “wild thing,” and you’re terrified somebody’s gonna stick you in a cage. Well baby, you’re already in that cage. You built it yourself. And it’s not bounded in the west by Tulip, Texas, or in the east by Somali-land. It’s wherever you go. Because no matter where you run, you just end up running into yourself.
—  Truman Capote, Breakfast at Tiffany’s