trophee bompard

Yuri on Life (YOI Guidebook) Overview

I got my copy of the YOI guidebook “Yuri on Life” today! Unfortunately, I don’t have time to give it a good look right now (it’s 144 pages packed with stuff), so I just skimmed through the majority of it. I’m noting some things that I’m excited about:

  • Skater’s Parameters
  • full list of SP&FS program elements for Yuuri, Victor (just FS), Yurio, J.J., Otabek, Chris, and Phichit. Along with the changes Yuuri, Yurio, and J.J. made to their programs in the GPF.
    • this means we can calculate their BVs now that we have confirmed spins
  • the coaches have names and small info blurbs!
    • Guang-Hong’s coach is ユー・シャオイー (Xiaoli Yu) 
    • Seung-gil’s coach is パク・ミンソ(Minsoo Park?)
      • (help with these names would be appreciated)
    • Phichit’s second coach is Coach Muramoto (村元) - the lady you see rinkside with Celestino in the GPF.
    • Leo’s coach…still has no name. But at least we know they train in Colorado Springs!  
  • calendar of the competitions starting from the Sochi GPF to the Barcelona GPF
    • apparently the Chu-Shikoku-Kyushu competition was the first week(end) of October
  • a completed points chart for qualifying for the GPF
  • Quite a number of real life skaters who watched YOI were interviewed
    • Takeshi Honda (who voiced himself in ep1 as the commentator next to Morooka), Takahiko Kozuka, Evgenia Medvedeva, Stephane Lambiel & Deniss Vasiljevs, and more. 
  • lots of staff interviews - Kubo-sensei, Director Sayo Yamamoto, seiyuu…
    • Sayo has a recommended skating programs list (“divine performance compilation”):
      • Evgeni Plushenko’s EX “Sex Bomb” (year not specified, although a 2003 GPF picture was used) 
      • Johnny Weir’s 2009 NHK EX “Poker Face” (not available, so I had to link the 2009/10 U.S. Nationals performance)
      • Stephane Lambiel’s 2007 Worlds FS “Poeta
      • Takahiko Kozuka’s 2014 Japan Nationals FS “Io Ci Saro
      • Denis Ten’s 2015 Four Continents FS “Ambush from Ten Sides
      • Yuzuru Hanyu’s 2012 Worlds FS “Romeo&Juliet” 
      • Patrick Chan’s 2013 Trophee Eric Bompard SP “Elegie in E flat minor
      • Tatsuki Machida’s 2014 Worlds SP “East of Eden
      • Daisuke Takahashi’s 2012 Japan Nationals FS “Pagliacci

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The Best of: Jeremy Abbott

2009-2010 SP “A Day in the Life” at 2010 Nationals
2009-2010 FS “Symphony No.3 (Saint-Saens)” at 2010 Nationals
2010-2011 FS “Life is Beautiful” at 2010 NHK Trophy
2010-2011 EX “Rhythm of Love” at 2011 4CC
2011-2012 SP “Sing, Sing, Sing” at 2012 Nationals
2011-2012 FS “Exogenesis: Symphony” at 2012 Nationals
2011-2012 EX “Hometown Glory” at 2012 Nationals
2012-2013 SP “Spy” at 2012 Trophee Bompard
2012-2013 FS “Bring Him Home” at 2012 Trophee Bompard
2013-2014 SP “Lilies of the Valley” at 2014 Nationals
2013-2014 FS “Exogenesis: Symphony” at 2014 Worlds
2013-2014 EX “Bring Him Home” at 2014 Nationals
2014-2015 FS “Adagio for Strings” at 2014 NHK Trophy
2014-2015 EX “Latch” at 2014 Skate America
EX “Dear Lord” at 2015 Nationals
FS “Old Pine” at 2016 Japan Open

Yuzuru Hanyu’s Mentality that Continues to Win.
–article by sports writer Toshimi Oriyama, from magazine ‘文藝春秋 2017年 02 月号’ (published in Jan 2017), translated by me.

(it’s a very long and good article)

Last year, in the figure skating Grand Prix Final (GPF) held in Marseille, France, Yuzuru Hanyu achieved a 4th consecutive victory, something that no one has done before. On the first day, his short programme (SP) was almost perfect and he was in 1st place, then 2 days later, for the free programme (FP), he made some mistakes. But he managed to escape the chase by younger skaters, Nathan Chen and Shoma Uno.

The 22 year-old, who is the Sochi Olympic gold medalist and who has since broken the world records a few times, thought back calmly about GPF 2016.
“As a goal, I am very proud of the 4th straight victory. But I am not satisfied with my performance. I am extremely 'kuyashii’ (frustrated/regretful) about the FP score which was in 3rd place. I did a good performance for SP and I thought if I did a fairly good one for FP, I could aim for world highest score; I need to review this point within myself.”

GPF is the high point of the first half of the season. It is a competition that shows the world’s best, similar to World Championship of the 2nd half. Hanyu’s 4th victory puts him on par with the 'emperor’ Evgeny Plushenko (Russia). However, for Hanyu, instead of the joy of victory, he felt more of the regret that he 'could not do a convincing performance’. And this ambition and hungriness is the mentality that is the source of Hanyu’s strength.

2010, Hanyu won the World Junior Championship, and the next season, he moved to the senior competitions. From that time, his supple and graceful performances already had a charm and the beauty of his jumps had a good reputation. Then, in 2011, in his hometown of Sendai, the Great East Japan Earthquake struck; that painful experience and recurring thoughts like “I think I will not be able to skate again” surely led him to grow as a person.

However, to possess that special mental strength to be able to stand at the highest point at the Olympics and to continue winning after that, there were 3 other turning points.
The presence of Patrick Chan (Canada) who was called 'the absolute champion’.
The 'kuyashii’ (regretful) gold medal at Sochi Olympics.
The accident at 2014 Cup of China.

Hanyu’s mental strength that could be seen in glimpses from the time of his debut, the 2013-2014 season added 'calmness’ and a 'spirit of study’ to that.
The year before, he had moved to the Cricket Club in Canada to train under Brian Orser and his abilities continued to blossom.
And there was a rival who was a big impetus for him. 3-time World champion Patrick Chan who also won GPF twice and was acknowledged to have the best skating skills in the world, plus huge battle strength on the big stage.

Hanyu faced Chan in 2 GP series competitions in 2013. The 1st one was Skate Canada where his score was lower than Chan’s by 27 points and the 2nd one was Trophee Eric Bompard where the gap was 32 points. He was 2nd place in both competitions and you could say it was a crushing defeat.

But these 2 straight losses caused Hanyu to change. Especially Chan’s clean performances at Trophee Eric Bompard that hit record scores for both SP and FP, “it was a trigger for me to look at my own abilities objectively”.
“I had nothing but respect and admiration for Patrick’s perfect performance. But at that competition, if both Patrick and I did perfect performances, I knew clearly how much of a gap there would be, and that made a big impact. At that time, I would have lost by about 5 points.”

No matter how perfectly he himself skated, there was a difference in the difficulty of jumps, the level of programme components and such; the reality was that if the opponent does not make mistakes, he (Hanyu) would lose. That was thrusted clearly at him in the form of results.
“To cover the gap between Patrick and me, there was a need to increase PCS. To do that, I had to relook at /improve my skating skills which is the foundation, and I had to be more aware of maintaining my expressive abilities during the run-through practice of the physically demanding programme. In addition, I had to get points for spins and steps, and higher GOE for jumps, I thought about all these things.”

Being conscious of the specific scores, having a strategy in the programme, he also came to have a deeper understanding of the meaning behind the practice that Coach Orser laid out for attaining high scores.

Also, he got a hint for his own growth from the words that Chan said.
During the press conference after the competition, sitting next to him, Chan was explaining in detail to the reporters how he was mindful about the way he used his body to express the music. Hanyu listened and “it was a good reference for my own performance”. After moving to Toronto, he had started learning English, so he probably understood the words between Chan and the reporter.

Hanyu at that time was only 19 (t/n. it was just before his 19th birthday). I have interviewed many athletes, not just figure skaters. But at press conferences of international competitions where foreign reporters overwhelm, even I feel that the nervousness is very pressurising. To turn that situation into a “learning area”, that 'spirit of desire’ deserves special mention.

When he received that impetus from Chan, at the same time there were words that made one feel the power of Hanyu’s inquiring mind. “Surrounded by reporters and being interviewed on-the-spot is useful,” he said.
“After a competition, media people surround me; in the exchange that I have with reporters, I can look back at my performance and talk about it right after I finish performing. I like to analyse my own performance, so it is very stimulating to have questions flying at me from various view points, and also, it enables me to think in a way that’s different from before. Interviews become a place for learning.”

Even veteran athletes find it hard to say something like this. It clearly shows his youth, and stemming from it, his frankness and inquiring mind.

The result of the impetus and learning points from Chan was seen quickly, at the GPF merely 3 weeks after the crushing defeat at Eric Bompard. Hanyu rewrote the world’s highest score for SP that was previously held by Chan, and his FP score was also his personal best. His total score was 13 points more than Chan and he won his first senior GPF.

Using the gold medal

Maintaining that energy/momentum was the key to the Olympic stage 2 months later.

His SP was a masterpiece and, for the 1st time in history, the score went above 100. He was in 1st place with 101.45. But for the FP, he fell at the 4S and 3F. He thought Chan who was 2nd after SP, would overtake him to be the winner. However, Chan also made mistakes and the result was that Hanyu won the gold medal.

“When I finished my performance, I thought the gold medal was not possible anymore. The failure of my FP made me realise the fearfulness of the Olympics, and I also felt the weight of the Olympics. I don’t know why but somehow my body could not move at all.”

The Olympic stage that’s once in 4 years. Participating for the first time and suddenly, he stood right at the top. Winning the first figure skating men’s gold medal for Japan, Hanyu decided immediately after that he would continue to evolve.

“In these next 4 years from now on, the pressure and the attention from the media and such, I think there will be a lot more of these extra things following me. In competitions, judges will not give me a higher evaluation just because I am an Olympic champion. How others see me does not matter. I myself must give a performance that’s worthy of a champion and really receive a gold medal evaluation. In this sense, I must make use of the position of 'Olympic Champion’. Because it is a chance for me to keep putting pressure on myself. Like telling myself, 'Oi, show us an Olympic champion-like performance! Hanyu Yuzuru, show some growth!’ (laughs)”

Then, the performance that left regrets on the Olympic stage, it became the will and desire to move forward to the next step. Thinking back, he said,
“For the FP at Sochi, if I had landed the quad salchow and done a no-miss performance, I would very likely be dragged by the Olympic champion result. Precisely because the Sochi gold medal was one that was carrying regretful thoughts, that’s why the present me exists. I got the Olympic gold medal at such a young age, and in addition, I received some problems to work on. As an athlete, this was really a lavish situation.”

A shocking collision

The season after Sochi, just as he said, he grew further, stepping his foot into unknown territory.
To prepare for the coming era of quads, he put a 4S and two 4Ts in his FP, and one of the 4T was in the 2nd half where more points would be given. To get used to this, he also put a 4T in the 2nd half of his SP. He spoke about the objective.
“It’s also preparation/groundwork for incorporating other kinds of quad jumps in future.”

However, his efforts met an unexpected setback at the 1st competition of the season, Cup of China (CoC). In the 6 minute warm-up before FP, there was an accident; he and Han Yan of China crashed into each other.
Blood could be seen dripping from Hanyu’s head (t/n. his chin) and there were screams from the audience. Coach Orser quickly called the doctors (t/n. U.S. team doctors came to help). After checking him, the doctors said there were no signs of concussion, but people around him told him not to skate.

However, Hanyu was stubborn. “I will skate.”

Orser reluctantly sent him into the rink, but of course, it was not the performance (that was planned). His whole body was battered and there was no strength, he fell a total of 5 times. What was pushing him on was his will power alone.
After this, he continued to compete until GPF, but the venture to make his performance one rank higher had to be shelved.

At the end of the year, due to intermittent abdominal pain, he went to the hospital for a checkup. He was found to have Urachal Remnant Disorder and underwent surgery. After that, he needed to rest and recover for one month. When he started to train again, he sprained his right ankle. Due to all this, he was 2nd in the World Championship that he was aiming for a 2nd straight victory. Even though he had a 2nd straight win at GPF, to him it was a year of stagnation.

After Worlds, he looked back on the season that was troubled by many accidents.
“The injuries and illnesses were hard on not only the body but on the mind/spirit as well. But even under those circumstances, I could at the very least leave some results; to me this experience was not not totally negative.
For the accident at CoC, there was insufficient attention on my part, so it triggered a re-looking at the way I entered into the competition, including the way I manage my body condition. And also, more than anything else, the way I was supported by my coaches and the people around me, it was a season where I felt it even more deeply than the Olympic season. All these experiences will be a plus in my competitive skating life, and also in my 2nd career after I retire.”

He also thought about the development of figure skating as a competitive sport. Based on his own accident, he said, “figure skating is a sport with an element of danger that can be a risk to life –that this is known to more people is a plus to the development of the sport.”  He also said he was happy that it gave rise to a tide of thoughts on what is necessary to prevent concussions and other life-threatening accidents.

No matter what 'minus’ elements there are, he transforms them into 'plus’, seizes them and looks ahead. As a reporter, this attitude of his amazes me from time to time.

Even when he is bleeding from his head, he is determined that he must go on with the competition; it was also due to the pride that comes because of achieving the title of Olympic champion (t/n. 'pride’ in the positive meaning). Hanyu very naturally has that on him.

The next season, 2015-2016, Hanyu once again challenged the programmes with a quad in the 2nd half.

In the 1st competition, Skate Canada, he was too conscious of the “quad in 2nd half” and made some unthinkable mistakes. As a result, he lost to Chan who had just returned from a year of rest.

However, it was different from before. Chan’s programme layout was lower in difficulty than his own, and he lost to Chan’s 'safe driving’ performance. It made him check/confirm if the direction and path that he was going was correct.
“Seeking even greater evolution is what is most like me.”

For his SP, in exchange for not having a quad in the 2nd half, he put 2 quads in the first half, 4S and 4T, making it even more difficult.
No matter what, he wants to challenge himself and this also raised his concentration power.  At the next competition, he scored 322.40, the first above-300 points in history. And then at GPF, he broke his own records with 330.43. With difficult programmes and clean performances back-to-back, it was a stunning victory over rivals Chan and Fernandez.

Storming through the 300-mark which no one has even touched before, Hanyu’s mental aspect has also reached that high level which normal people cannot comprehend.

“At Sochi Olympics, my free skate performance failed. When I finished, I thought 'the gold medal is gone’. And at that moment, I realised, 'ah, so I was conscious of the gold medal and I was nervous’. This time, that experience at Sochi was put to good use. Before entering the venue, I was aware that I was thinking 'I want to surpass 300 points’. So first, I acknowledged that I am thinking about that and putting pressure on myself, and then, 'if so, I have to do this’ and I think I controlled well my mental state.”

In a situation of being closely chased, the strength to look at himself calmly brought forth a spectacular feat.

For the 2016-2017 season, he decided on new challenges, having a quad loop in both SP and FP and a layout that’s more difficult. When 2016 started, the pain in his left foot (t/n. lisfranc injury) became worse, and after Worlds, even walking was not allowed and this restriction period continued for one and a half months. But in spite of that, he still aimed for further evolution.

Connection with the audience

But it was also an inevitable decision. The previous season, Boyang Jin (China) had 3 types of quads, including the most difficult (of the quads jumped til now) quad lutz, and 6 quads in total for SP and FP and he was 3rd in Worlds. Then Shoma Uno did the world’s 1st quad flip in the Team Challenge Cup in April.

Hanyu himself opened up the frontier of 300 points. Rising young skaters have quads as weapons to challenge him. And it’s not just about having quads, it is about the number of quads and how well they are done; this era of competition has come.

This season, in addition to jumps and layout, Hanyu is widening his range of expression. This can be said as his real value/ ability.

His SP is Prince’s 'Let’s Go Crazy’. It’s rock music that brings to mind his Sochi Olympics SP 'Parisienne Walkways’. FP is 'Hope and Legacy’ which is a combination of 2 pieces of piano music from Joe Hisaishi that Hanyu likes very much. They are 2 contrasting types of music. SP is an uptempo music that Hanyu is very good at; FP piano music has a rhythm and sounds that are harder to grasp for jump timing.
Having 2 completely opposite types of music was for raising his own expressive abilities. At GP Final which he won for the 4th consecutive time, he spoke of being aware of a 'connection with the audience’.

“This season’s SP, I am performing it like a rock star having a live concert, so it’s a programme that is not possible without the audience. In France (GPF), the audience also became very excited and it was very fun. Then for the FP, I could perform while feeling the music with my whole body. It’s different from the SP, it’s not a programme where the audience becomes more and more excited and clap and go WA!!! But during the performance, I could feel the gaze of the audience, and when I did my jumps, I could see there were people praying for me. I connected with the audience, in other words, our feelings became one, and I felt this happiness.”

Something that is in the beat and the meaning of the lyrics of Prince; abandoning yourself to the piano music of Joe Hisaishi and feeling the wind, the trees, the air and other things of nature. Sharing with the audience the world that you express through skating, wanting to create a programme that’s like having a conversation with the audience – that is one of the complete forms of figure skating which is sports and also art.

From TV and books etc, Hanyu studies the ways of thinking of athletes from other sports and reflects them in skating. He often says that this is his weapon. Recently, gymnast Kohei Uchimura who won a consecutive victory at Rio Olympics said, “I had to win, it was good.” Words in which you could feel the heavy pressure on someone who stood at the top, those words left a deep impression on him. Without being imprisoned by existing boundaries, he wants to pursue figure skating further and further, this is his thinking.

“Receiving the programmes from the choreographer, integrating jumps into it and performing it, that is my job/work. When all the jumps are completed beautifully, then it can be called a real performance. That is why I am so regretful (kuyashii); while adding in a new quad and doing a layout that’s more difficult than last season, I am still not able to make a new personal best score this season. If I speak my true feelings, I want to raise my scores and become the Yuzuru Hanyu that no one can catch.”

For his own growth, for figure skating as a sport, his desire/greed never fades, and this is his true strength as a skater. And it can also be said that this is why he makes us feel that for him there are infinite possibilities.

– original article by sports writer Ms.Toshimi Oriyama;  very sorry if I didn’t translate it well enough. 

Q: Should Yuzuru put quad lutz in for next season?

So much overthinking as the person I am, with the lack of news during off-season, thoughts about technical aspects of next season have been wandering around inside my head for quite a while. 

Anh the big question for me as a Yuzuru’s fan is what should he do with his layout for next season? Should he add a new quad in or not? 

In a TV show and a magazine interview after WTT, Yuzuru said that he has no intention to put quad lutz in his program for Pyeongchang (though that quad was so beautiful, no pre-rotation and his toepick for inward, wtf). Also, I recalled from his FaOI talk with Nobunari and Shoma, he wrote for his goals that he want to consolidate what he learned so far into the program for Olympics 2018. All these made me have a very strong feeling that he is actually serious about not putting quad lutz in.

That’s fine, “no quad lutz is fine”, I thought. But what’s he gonna do with next season program and how will it be better from this year’s? Turned out, his layout already maxed out its value for a program with 3 kinds of quads he got (mostly for the LP): 

  • He’s only allowed to repeat 2 kinds of jumps, one of which is undoubtedly 3A given how much he loves it and how comfortable he is with it 
  • He got 2 quad salchow this season, and the biggest change can only be from 4S to 4L or doing a hard combination for 4S-2T. 

As for the situation we’re in and also for context, I find it very helpful to look back at the 13-14 Olympic season. The 2 main skaters that I’m gonna discuss in that season are Patrick and Yuzuru (for obvious reason). After taking the silver at Skate Canada and Trophee Bompard, Yuzuru got gold at GPF 2013 and then at Sochi, overthrowing Patrick’s throne that had been going on for the past 3 years. And the reason Yuzuru was able to do so were:

  • He got a really good SP that he could skate well and skate consistently, which creates a lead for him after SP 
  • By doing more difficult elements and placing them in the second half of the free program, he got an advantage in BV comparing to Patrick, which also allows him to win with a not very clean program (as I saw him struggle to skate clean his LP that season) 

For 13-14 season free program, the difference in BV of Yuzuru and Patrick was around 8 points, the total GOE for Yuzuru was 8-14 and Patrick was 17-18. So with a quite similar TES and a lead in SP, Yuzuru was able to win Patrick who was deemed unbeatable. 

For this season, this is some averages (just estimation, not exact) I got for the three skaters I think have the most potential for gold in Pyeongchang (this is only for the free, as to me their SP are around the same score): 

  1. Yuzu BV 103, GOE 20-23, PCS 94-97 
  2. Shoma BV 104, GOE 7.5-15, PCS 91-94
  3. Nathan BV 104, GOE 9-12, PCS 84-88
  4. Boyang BV 103, GOE 9-15 , PCS 83-86

My guess are that Nathan’s gonna add another 4Lz (layout like the one for Worlds this season), Shoma’s gonna add 4F, and Boyang’s gonna add another quad too (not sure about him, 4Lz/4L). This will up their BV by 8-10 points alone, assumed they don’t add any other changes and they have the same level of skating. However, things never stay constant. The three younger skaters still have a lot to improve on their PCS and how many GOEs they can take, so those number will definitely increase next season. 

I don’t underestimate Yuzuru’s ability to evolve, it’s just that he’s much closer to the point of “perfection”, according to CoP. In recent years, the maximum GOE he got was around 70-80% of max GOE for the whole free skate. And even if he got 10% more on GOE, which I think is “wow”, that’s an increase of only 3 points. His PCS is already around 97-98 points and I doubt that it can go any much higher.

 So assumed that he does as I said, keeping the quad lutz out of the equation, then Yuzuru might fall into the seat of Patrick in 2013. He’s an awesome skater, and it’s clear that no one can beat him if he can skate clean both programs. But from my short time as a fan, as much a believer I am of him doing the best come back from behind ever, I seriously won’t bet my money on him skating 2 programs clean under such pressure every time. The stress that he put on himself to skate clean SP in WTT 2017 and its result is a good evidence for this, I think. I think he knows much better about his hot-and-cold moments and as someone who used the BV card just a few seasons ago, he shouldn’t put the Olympic gold medal on such a risky bet like that in my opinion.

Of course, all my worries will be for nothing if he got an amazing SP from Jeff and leads the way with a few points in the SP. But those things, you never know until the season starts a while. I’m kinda worried because he seems to struggle a little bit with his first season for an SP, but me in my wishful thinking mode will hope that Jeff and Yuzu will go back to programs that Yuzuru can rock it CLEAN (they wanted LGC to be a challenge and it definitely was XD). I don’t really worry about Shae, so mehh… the choreography should be fine, it’s just about the jumps.

Again, so much uncertainty, and the ability of younger skaters to compensate the gap in quality with the BV of their quads as mentioned above put me into panick mode cause I really think he should put quad lutz in but there is no sign he would do so. Yuzu, I know you’re a smart ass, I just don’t know what’s in your mind right now =.=

Yes, that was all those clogged in my head *relieved*. But whatever happens, I’ll  still be happy I think. Either seeing that beautiful quad lutz in competition or witnessing a smooth and complex skate by Yuzu, so come fast next season!

 * this started out as some thoughts I have after Yuzu mentioned he wouldn’t include 4Lz in his program, then I kinda asked around tumblr a bit, only to realize I couldn’t include all my arguments and confusion in such small spaces. In the end, after 2 long weeks, I’m just like “Whatever, I’ll write this down and let them butcher my opinion.” So come join the discussion and enlighten me, guys! (that is if you’re still here at the end of this long ass post) *

do grand prixs and jgps have galas?

The senior Grand Prix events have galas. Most Junior Grand Prix events don’t, though the one in France usually does (but there is no JGP in France this year).

Hi, I am a fan for only less than a year. I wonder if this question is already asked or not so if asked, you can ignore this. The rules say the top 1-3 and 4-6 cannot compete each other in the GP competitions. However, the result of Worlds2012 is Daisuke 2nd and Yuzuru 3rd; but they also both competed in NHK Trophy 2012. How was that possible? Or maybe the rules were different?

The “rule” about 1-3 and 4-6 not meeting on the GP is more like a guideline, it is not set in stone. What happened in 2012 was that NHK Trophy and Trophee Eric Bompard “swapped” skaters so they could have two of their own top men at their home events - Takahashi (2nd at Worlds) and Hanyu (3rd at Worlds) both ended up at NHK Trophy, while Joubert (4th at Worlds) and Amodio (5th at Worlds) were both assigned to TEB. Normally, this wouldn’t happen, but it did happen that year and could conceivably happen again. The ISU does not publish the exact procedure for GP assignments so there are many details about the process that we do not know.

Hi! Does the ‘official’ season start with this week’s Lake Placid competition? If not, when does it start? Thanks

The season officially starts on July 1st every year.

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well then, catch me if you can ||  misc. sizeable point gaps in int'l comps by select skaters of asian descent
mao asada } 2013 nhk trophy (15.78 pts.)
daisuke takahashi } 2012 world team trophy (16.26 pts.)
pang/tong } 2011 four continents championships (17.66 pts.)
shen/zhao } 2009 skate america (29.58 pts.)
patrick chan } 2013 trophee eric bompard (31.68 pts.)
yuzuru hanyu } 2014 grand prix final (34.26 pts.)
yuna kim } 2012 nrw trophy (42.60 pts.)
Yuri on Ice fic preview because oh God I’m so tired why not someone please put me out of my misery, please

So if you follow me on twitter, you may have seen that I am writing a Yuri on Ice fan fiction and that it is k i l l i n g me because it is 118 pages. So I thought, why not share the pain. Keep an eye out. I’m posting this before the end of February if it kills me. 

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