troodontids

Ouranodromeus artifex

Height: 1m
Weight: 20kg
Classification: Maniraptora, Paraves, Troodontidae, Neotroodontidae, Dexteropterygidae, Sapiornithoides


As promised, here is the droman skeleton!  They look pretty silly without feathers, which is why I’ve included two silhouettes.  To be honest, the whole reason I designed them with prominent head feathers was to hide the awkwardly large braincase, which made many dinosauroids ugly imo.  Also, as a cartoonist the feathers will prove useful for emoting.

Below is a brief list of key anatomical features.

Enlarged braincase - Self-explanatory, really
Reduced jaw muscles - Allowed more space for the brain to grow
Reduced muzzle - Correlated with reduced jaw muscles, as well as the increasingly omnivorous diet, the lack of need for a killing bite, and the increase in neotenous features
Short, thick neck - Supports the enlarged head closer to the center of gravity
Long head feathers - For display and conveying emotion
Long forearms - Used for flight in juveniles and for a lengthy reach in adults
Opposable thumbs - For manipulation
Dexterous feet - Reversed hallux is held off the ground while walking
Opisthopubic pelvis

I promise I’ll have a write-up on how/why dromans are sapient soon!  I’ve put tons of thought into it and every new piece of information I’ve learned over the past few months has reinforced my ideas on how it happened.  As a bit of a teaser, they’re an extremely social species with a huge emphasis on showing off in every way.  Intelligence, creativity and dexterity, while moderately useful for survival, are expensive traits that wouldn’t really need to develop past a certain point…that is, if it hadn’t been for runaway sexual selection!

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More dinosaur concepts! I’ve decided Sealights is gonna be melanistic, and shadowed by superstition wherever she goes. Poor girl.

Some centrosaurs who are a big part of Sealights life–Shoot is her adopted momma, Glaciertusk is King of the Herd and Shoot’s son, Baldface is an aggressive old hind, and Whistler is Sealights’ closest friend.

And then an unfinished painting of some silly troodontids who thought raiding an hesperonychus nest was a smart idea. I’m not gonna finish it but I thought it was corny.

Euronychodon portucalensis, E. asiaticus

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euronychodon

Name: Euronychodon portucalensis, E. asiaticus

Name Meaning: European claw tooth

First Described: 1991

Described By: Antunes & Sigogneau-Russell

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Eusaurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria, Tyrannoraptora, Maniraptoriformes, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Eumaniraptora, Averaptora, Troodontidae

Euronychodon was a tooth taxon troodontid, found in Europe and Asia. E. portucalensis was found in Taveiro, Portugal, dating back to about 70 million years ago in the Maastrichtian age of the Late Cretaceous. E. asiaticus was found in the Bissekty Formation of Uzbekistan, dating to about 92 million years ago, in the Turonian age of the Late Cretaceous. Given that it is only known from teeth, it is unsure whether or not it was a coelurid, an ornithomimosaur, a dromaeosaurid, or a troodontid. The enamel was identical to that of Byronosaurus, a troodontid, hence its current classification. It probably would have been about two meters long and would have been carnivorous or insectivorous. 

Source: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euronychodon

Shout out goes to andthenwegrillit!

Byronosaurus was a tiny animal belonging to the troodontids, a group of small, feathered, non-bird dinosaurs with large brains. It lived in the Late Cretaceous, about 80 million years ago. 

Meet Byronosaurus and many other non-bird dinosaurs in the new exhibition, Dinosaurs Among Us, open now to visitors who have purchased a Museum membership, and open March 21 to the public.

Illustration: Zhao Chuang; courtesy of Peking Natural Science Organization

Kids' book on feathered dinosaurs?

All my awesome followers! How many of you would be seriously interested if I were to produce (probably self-published) a kids’ book about feathered dinosaurs? It’s an idea I’ve been kicking around for a while now, and I was thinking of maybe starting some preliminary work on it in-between “real” work, but first I wanted to gauge general interest.

The text would feature 12-16 feathered Mesozoic dinosaurs, probably weighted heavily towards dromaeosaurids and troodontids, with a smattering of basal birds and maybe some others. Each dinosaur would be illustrated in watercolor by me, and would be accompanied by a fun but informative poem that describes a bit about the dinosaur, what’s important about it, and what we know from its fossil.

Its intention would be to entertain and educate kids, but it would not be “dumbed down” and would definitely be accessible to adults too!

Any thoughts? Suggestions about what to include, or what to avoid?

Look! It’s a fledgling Fossil Friday. 

This extraordinary fossil, discovered in Mongolia, preserves a recently hatched Byronosaurus atop the eggs of what would have been its nest mates. The eggs are not paired, suggesting the egg-layer had only one egg tube—the modern bird condition. 

Byronosaurus was a tiny animal belonging to the troodontids, a group of small, feathered, non-bird dinosaurs with large brains. It lived in the Late Cretaceous, about 80 million years ago. 

Learn more about dinosaur nests, eggs, and babies in the new exhibition, Dinosaurs Among Us, now open!

Images: © AMNH/M. Ellison, Zhao Chuang; courtesy of Peking Natural Science Organization

Sinornithoides youngi

Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sinornithoides-youngi_jconway.png

Name: Sinornithoides youngi

Name Meaning: Chinese Bird Form

First Described: 1993

Described By: Russell & Dong 

ClassificationDinosauria, Saurischia, Eusaurischia, Theropoda, Neotheropoda, Averostra, Tetanurae, Orionides, Avetheropoda, Coelurosauria, Tyrannoraptora, Maniraptoriformes, Maniraptora, Pennaraptora, Paraves, Eumaniraptora, Averaptora, Troodontidae

Sinornithoides was - you guessed it - another troodontid from Asia. Specifically it was found in the Ejinhoro Formation of Inner Mongolia, China, and lived in the Aptian to Albian ages of the Early Cretaceous, about 113 million years ago, making it a little older than our typical troodontids. It would have been about 1.1 meters long and less than a meter high (more like half a meter high), and it was one of the most completely known troodontids in 1994 (which wasn’t saying much, as troodontids are typically known only from teeth.) It had a long and pointed skull, however it was short compared to the rest of the body. 

Source:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinornithoides

Shout out goes to rivalakill!