tron mai

Had time to finish a rather hasty Aria T’Loak portrait! I love her, she’s such a badass, and the Omega DLC was probably one of the best around for the Mass Effect series. While painting this I noticed that some of her features, especially her crest, are a lot softer and not as speckled/freckled as some other Asari. I know that now, and in the past, I wonder if her dad was a Hanar or something. Maybe that’s why she’s purple instead of blue, haha.

Here’s other portraits for the same series: Liara T’Soni , Peebee , Samara , Dr. Lexi T’Perro , Shiala

More info: I decided I would start a little digital painting project to keep me artistically active for a while, so to celebrate the month of May my theme is:

“May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs”

I’ll just be painting a whole buncha beautiful blue (and purple… possibly green) Asari from the Mass Effect series!

Allow me to introduce the TRON Fandom

“What?” you may ask. “There’s a fandom besides Doctor Who, Supernatural, and Sherlock on Tumblr?” Yeah. Pay attention, the Avengers are pretty big here too, along with the rest of the MCU.

But I’m not here to talk about that. I’m here to talk about TRON.

“Do you mean that hokey 80s Sci-Fi flick I’ve never watched because it just looks lame, or that two hour Daft Punk music video?”

Don’t you start with me. And stop interrupting.

We are the Tron fandom. We appreciate these movies. Know why? Because we actually sat and enjoyed the story.

Sure, we’re pretty small. Neither film did as well as Disney wanted in the box office. But you know what?

We’re powerful.

Yknow that game that came out, Disney Infinity? Yeah, the one with the figures. When it first came out we wanted TRON characters in it. So we asked. We pushed. And you know what?

We got em in the next version.

But they were DIGITAL ONLY????

We weren’t about to sit still for that. So you know what we did? We nagged again and we got our physical figures. Some of us don’t even play Disney Infinity and we bought the figures, both digitally and physically. Some of us have a little army of Quorra’s on our shelves.

We may be small. We may not have a lot of content out there. But we are PASSIONATE. We snap up whatever we get. Heck, we waited nearly thirty years for a sequel movie to the first movie, and got a FPS video game in between. And we ate it up. We are the ones who buy the comics, who watched every episode of Uprising, even when it was on at MIDNIGHT. Not to mention we own every episode of TRON: Uprising on iTunes, Amazon Digital, etc.

We’re the ones who sent Disney hundreds, possibly thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands of glow sticks when we heard that our third movie was shelved, and boy do we refuse to say it’s cancelled.

We’re the ones who are going NUTS over every piece of beautiful concept art that was “leaked” from “TRON: Escape.”

We’re the ones who flipped out when we found out that ‘TRON: Escape’ actually was happening, only by a different name (TRON: RUN/r), and are buying it up on Steam EVEN THOUGH THE GAME ISN’T DONE YET.

We’re the ones who read, watch, play, and buy anything with TRON on it.

We’re the ones who have created intricate backstories and fan fictions and fan characters, some characters that are written so well they feel like they are canon.

We’re the ones who refuse to believe that the Tron franchise is dead.

Now, more than ever,

TRON LIVES.

TRONBLR, ARISE.

Next up is a Peebee! I ended up romancing her, haha. As a disclaimer I probably fucked up her subtle facial markings on this, but yeah, I tried. :D

Here’s other portraits for the same series: Liara T’Soni , Samara , Aria T’Loak , Dr. Lexi T’Perro , Shiala

More info: I decided I would start a little digital painting project to keep me artistically active for a while, so to celebrate the month of May my theme is:

“May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs”

I’ll just be painting a whole buncha beautiful blue (and purple… possibly green) Asari from the Mass Effect series!

anonymous asked:

Idk if anyone's mentioned this before but Keith is shown not to get a bunch of things that most people would be able to easily grasp because they show up in popular media (ex: when I say vol you say tron) and that may be because he grew up isolated but also if you were an alien would you understand stuff like that? Probably not.

@autistickeith was the one to first put this into words but:

I don’t really like using Keith’s inability to grasp social nuances as evidence that he’s an alien. I’m really biased because I follow @autistickeith and he posts some Good Shit, so I can’t help but see Keith as autistic (or at least neuroatypical in some way or another). I have ADHD and sometimes I have difficulty understanding what someone means, that doesn’t mean I’m a fucking alien.

There is soooo much evidence in canon that Keith is an alien, you don’t need to drag the way his brain works into this. I understand where you’re coming from, it’s easy to think “Oh Keith doesn’t know when someone is being sarcastic, haha he’s such an alien” but like. People who are neuroatypical get bullied over this shit. I hate being mocked when I can’t understand something.

Sooo…. yeah lol

8

42nd Annual Annie Awards Winners

  • Best Animated Feature - How to Train Your Dragon 2 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Directing in an Animated Feature Production - Dean DeBlois - How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Best Animated Short Subject - Feast - Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Editorial in an Animated Feature Production - John K. Carr - How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Production Design in an Animated Feature Production - Paul Lasaine, Tom McClure & August Hall - The Boxtrolls
  • Character Design in an Animated Feature Production - Paul Sullivan, Sandra Equihua, Jorge R. Gutierrez - The Book of Life
  • Character Animation in a Feature Production - Fabio Lignini - How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Character Animation in a Live Action Production - Daniel Barrett, Paul Story, Eteuati Tema, Alessandro Bonora, Dejan Momcilovic - Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
  • Animated Effects in an Animated Production - Michael Kaschalk, Peter DeMund, David Hutchins, Henrik Falt, John Kosnik - Big Hero 6
  • Animated Effects in a Live Action Production - Steve Avoujageli, Atsushi Ikarashi, Pawel Grochola, Paul Waggoner, Viktor Lundqvist - Edge of Tomorrow
  • Music in an Animated Feature Production - John Powell, Jónsi - How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production - Sir Ben Kingsley as the voice of Archibald Snatcher - The Boxtrolls
  • Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production - Truong “Tron” Son Mai - How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Writing in an Animated Feature Production - Phil Lord & Christopher Miller - The LEGO Movie

I decided I would start a little digital painting project to keep me artistically active for a while, so to celebrate the month of May my theme is:

“May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs” 

I’ll just be painting a whole buncha beautiful blue (and purple… possibly green) Asari from the Mass Effect series!

Started off with my favorite blue space waifu, Liara T’Soni.

Here are some of the other portraits from this series: Peebee , Samara , Aria T’Loak , Dr. Lexi T’Perro , Shiala

youtube

[Lavapasta]: TRON Legacy and Digital Filmmaking

The 2010 TRON sequel may have its ups and downs, but in regard to its franchise as a whole, Tron Legacy accomplishes what its predecessor has been doing since 1982: demonstrating the power of computers and how they can be used to create films.

The TRON series isn’t just about characters exploring the environment of a computer, it’s about creators exploring their own technological limits in the film industry.  

8

42 Annual Annie Awards Nominees (Part ½)

Best Animated Feature 

  • Big Hero 6 - 
Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Cheatin’ - Plymptoons Studio
  • How to Train Your Dragon 2 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Song of the Sea - GKIDS/Cartoon Saloon
  • The Book of Life - Reel FX Animation Studios/Twentieth Century Fox
  • The Boxtrolls - Focus Features/Laika
  • The LEGO Movie -Warner Bros. Pictures
  • The Tale of The Princess Kaguya - GKIDS/Studio Ghibli

Best Animated Short Subject

  • Coda 
- And Maps And Plans Ltd.
  • Duet
 - Glen Keane Productions/ATAP
  • Feast
 - Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Inside Homer The Simpsons Couch Gag (Episode #549) - Acme Filmworks 
  • Me and My Moulton
 - Mikrofilm AS/National Film Board of Canada
  • Silent - Moonbot Studios
  • The Dam Keeper 
- Tonko House LLC
  • The Raven - Moonbot Studios

Outstanding Achievement, Directing in an Animated Feature Production

  • Don Hall & Chris Williams - Big Hero 6
 - Walt Disney Animation Studios 
  • Bill Plympton - Cheatin'
 - Plymptoons Studio
  • Dean DeBlois - How to Train Your Dragon 2
 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Tomm Moore - Song of the Sea
 - GKIDS/Cartoon Saloon
  • Jorge R. Gutierrez - The Book of Life
 - Reel FX Animation Studios/Twentieth Century Fox
  • Anthony Stacchi & Graham Annable - The Boxtrolls
 - Focus Features/Laika
  • Phil Lord & Christopher Miller, Directors; Chris McKay, Co-Director - The LEGO Movie -Warner Bros. Pictures
  • Isao Takahata - The Tale of The Princess Kaguya
 - GKIDS/Studio Ghibli 

Outstanding Achievement, Writing in an Animated Feature Production

  • Robert L. Baird, Daniel Gerson & Jordan Roberts - Big Hero 6
 - Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • Dean DeBlois - How to Train Your Dragon 2
 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Will Collins - Song of the Sea 
- GKIDS/Cartoon Saloon
  • Irena Brignull & Adam Pava - The Boxtrolls
 - Focus Features/Laika
  • Phil Lord & Christopher Miller - The Lego Movie
 - Warner Bros. Pictures

Outstanding Achievement, Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production

  • Marc E. Smith - Big Hero 6
 - Walt Disney Animation Studios 
  • Truong “Tron” Son Mai - How to Train Your Dragon 2
 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Piero Peluso - Planes: Fire & Rescue
 - Disneytoon Studios
  • John Hurst - Rio 2
 - Blue Sky Studios/Twentieth Century Fox Animation 
  • Rodrigo Castro - Rio 2
 - Blue Sky Studios/Twentieth Century Fox Animation 
  • Julian Nariño - The Boxtrolls
 - Focus Features/Laika 
  • Emanuela Cozzi - The Boxtrolls
 - Focus Features/Laika

Outstanding Achievement, Production Design in an Animated Feature Production

  • David James, Ruben Perez, Priscilla Wong, Timothy Lamb & Alexandre Puvilland - Mr. Peabody & Sherman
 - DreamWorks Animation
  • Adrien Merigeau - Song of the Sea - 
GKIDS/Cartoon Saloon
  • Simon Varela & Paul Sullivan - The Book of Life 
- Reel FX Animation Studios/Twentieth Century Fox 
  • Paul Lasaine, Tom McClure & August Hall - The Boxtrolls
 - Focus Features/Laika
  • Grant Freckelton - The LEGO Movie
 - Warner Bros. Pictures  

Outstanding Achievement, Editorial in an Animated Feature Production

  • Tim Mertens - Big Hero 6 
- Walt Disney Animation Studios
  • John K. Carr - How to Train Your Dragon 2 - DreamWorks Animation SKG
  • Dan Molina, Mark Keefer & Karen Hathaway - Planes: Fire & Rescue - 
Disneytoon Studios
  • Darragh Byrne - Song of the Sea
 - GKIDS/Cartoon Saloon
  • David Burrows, Todd Hansen, Doug Nicholas, Jonathan Tappin & Courtney O'Brien-Brown - The LEGO Movie 
- Warner Bros. Pictures

Here’s a Samara portrait. She’s def one of my faves from the Mass Effect trilogy, and I loved her story arc, being torn between her duty as a justicar and the unconditional motherly love she held for her daughters.

Here’s other portraits for the same series: Liara T’Soni , Peebee , Aria T’Loak , Dr. Lexi T’Perro , Shiala

More info: I decided I would start a little digital painting project to keep me artistically active for a while, so to celebrate the month of May my theme is:

“May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs”

I’ll just be painting a whole buncha beautiful blue (and purple… possibly green) Asari from the Mass Effect series!

Interview with Naomi Hicks

What do you do?

Hi there! My name’s Naomi, and I’m a story revisionist on Penn Zero: Part-time Hero! I work with my director Tom DeRosier on multiple episodes at various stages of production. I may rough out sequences for an early board, revise sequences before an executive pitch, and continue revising sequences up until the final lock, before the episodes are shipped out to be animated.

 How did you get to where you are now?

I was always a weird, creative kid, and I liked drawing comics and coming up with stories. Around middle school or high school I discovered Adobe Flash and decided that I wanted to be an animator. I was really fortunate to attend CSSSA when I was 16, it’s a one-month program held at CalArts that encourages kids to pursue the arts, and includes a really great animation program. It gave me a glimpse of what the animation world looks like and taught me that yes, you can totally draw cartoons for a living. Following CSSSA, I took a LOT of life drawing classes and attended art school for two years. Art school was really expensive, and I knew by that point that I wanted to be a story artist, so I dropped out and decided to pursue my own art education. I took classes primarily at the Animation Guild and Concept Design Academy. I took a lot of classes, and focused primarily on building my skills as a board artist. Concept Design Academy in particular has helped me build relationships with amazing peers and teachers who have helped guide me to where I am today. Every industry job I’ve had has been thanks in part to friends at Concept Design Academy who have told me about upcoming jobs or recommended me for open positions.

 What are the most rewarding, challenging, and surprising aspects of your job?

One of the most rewarding aspects of my job is getting to pitch my work and make people laugh. It feels really incredible to have the attention of the room, and when people laugh it really brings the board to life. The most challenging aspect for me is dealing with technical challenges. Boarding action can be difficult, and knowing how to best handle the camera and cutting is a skill that takes a lot of time and experience to develop. The most surprising aspect of my job is probably the amount of freedom I can get. A lot of the time, revision work is just making small fixes to a scene, but when a board is in a rough phase, you sometimes get to board bigger sections of it.

 What skills do you have that help you in your job? Are there skills you want to develop? And if so, how do you plan to develop them?

Drawing quickly is very important. It’s important to develop a shorthand, because there isn’t time to fully flesh out every drawing. It’s very important to determine which information in a scene is the most important, because you don’t have time to draw every detail. The skills I still need to develop are stronger use of camera and cutting. Sometimes it’s easy to forget about the 180 line, or board yourself into a corner when doing complex action scenes or scenes with a lot of characters. I plan to develop these skills further by boarding more, studying more films, and studying how filmmakers I admire handle different types of scenes.

 What’s your typical day like?

On a typical day, I either continue working on sequences that have already been assigned to me, or I check in with my director to get new sequences to work on. My director is responsible for multiple episodes, all of which are at different stages of being completed and locked, so I might be jumping around on different boards, depending on which stage of the process an episode is in. I check my email and calendar - we often have pitches, episode playbacks, etc, and it’s good to see what’s going on. When I finish my work I go check in with my director and ask for more scenes. If there’s ever a time where my director doesn’t have work for me, but another director is swamped, he may tell me to go check with them and ask them if they need help. I’ll usually check in with my director again before I leave. Revisionists typically work with the director, not the board artist, but occasionally I’ll be asked to check in with the board artist and see what they need help with.

 What advice would you give to someone who wants to do what you do?

Study storyboarding. Working as a story revisionist is a good place to learn, but you need to know enough about storyboarding in order to be qualified. Studios often look for revisionists that they can train, and one day potentially work with as board artists. Know the technical side of boarding, and also study what makes a good story. You may get scripts that don’t excite you - learn how to identify what makes a story stronger or weaker, so you’ll know how to plus your work and make your boards strong. Keep focusing on the area you want to end up in – there are different qualities that directors look for when they hire artists for animated feature boards, live action boards, and television boards. But all of them require strong drawing skills and clear understanding of camera, so always work on strengthening your abilities. Also, be a good person and have good work ethic! Directors will usually pick the person who is better to work with, who can be counted on to turn things in on time, and who doesn’t make excuses, over the person who draws better but is a nightmare to work with. Be nice to everyone and don’t burn bridges, because the industry is small and there’s a good chance you’ll see these people again.

Is there anything you’d like to say about your experience as a woman working in entertainment art?

Things are certainly better than ever for women working in entertainment art. Women In Animation in particular does a lot of good work to connect women in this industry. However, there are still many areas of the industry where women are not integrated enough, particularly in positions of power. I don’t see enough female board artists, female directors, female showrunners, female executives, or female CEOs. The sexism may be less blatant these days, but many women do still experience grey areas of discrimination, and there is still a ‘bro culture’ that persists in some environments, and can be unwelcoming to women. Even in the areas in which women are making strides, it’s frustrating to see women becoming ‘the first female ___’ that a company has ever hired, in 2015.

 More women are studying animation than men these days, and yet women are still heavily underrepresented in the industry, both behind the scenes and onscreen, where most films and cartoons feature more male characters than female characters, and the male characters speak more than female characters. Women still have to question whether or not they’re being paid fairly, and women do still experience sexism and misogyny in the workplace. The industry is more accepting these days of women, people of color, and LGBT+ employees, and yet when you look at the demographics, the majority of people in power are white men.

 I’ve been fortunate to work on a show that has a positive environment for women, and to work with a really great female director that I admire, as well as fellow female board artists and revisionists. Disney in particular promotes a strong policy against harassment, and is one of the best workplaces for LGBT+ employees. But every woman in this industry has a different experience, and I’ve heard from women who have been underpaid, objectified, or who have experienced sexual harassment. There’s also the fact that this is a fast-paced industry, without protection for women who need to take time off to have children. When and if you have kids can impact a woman’s career in animation much more dramatically than it affects men’s careers. Men and women need to stand up for our rights in this industry, since everyone stands to benefit from an industry that better serves its workers. Women in this industry need to support each other and root for each other’s successes. It’s important to look at our representation in the industry and fight for more, and to stand up for intersectionality. It’s so important to fight for progress in this industry, because everybody has stories to tell.

Is there anyone you’d like to thank?

I have TOO MANY people I need to thank! I’ve been really fortunate to have met so many people who have taken the time to teach me and give me guidance in my career.

 Tron Mai, Marshall Vandruff, and Ben Juwono are hands down the best teachers I’ve ever had, and they’ve each done so much to encourage and support me. They each have such valuable wisdom to share and I’ve been really fortunate to learn from them.

 I owe a lot to the people who patiently gave me advice when I was considering leaving art school - James Joyce, Jessie Greenberg, and Kevin Chen; as well as the wonderful teachers at CDA and the Animation Guild who gave me feedback and helped me on my journey, especially Louie Del Carmen, Rad Sechrist, Tony Shelton, Mark McDonnell, Will Weston, Jay Oliva, and John Nevarez.  

 I especially owe thanks to the wonderful Penn Zero crew, who have given me so many opportunities! Sam Levine is a really inspiring showrunner, and I owe him for taking chances on crazy young upstarts like me. Kat Good is an incredible, empowering director, and the first woman I’ve met in the industry who I can count on for honest guidance in all areas of life. I also owe a lot to Tom DeRosier and Adam Henry for mentoring me, as well as my wonderful crewmates, especially Arielle Rosenstein, David Shair, Travis Blaise, Hillary Bradfield, and Casey Coffey, for sharing a ton of laughs and christening me “Tiny Furiosa”.  

 I also have to thank my parents for being supportive of all my crazy artistic endeavors, and for letting me drop out of school! And my boyfriend Preston Do for being there for me through this whole crazy journey. And the incredible friends and strangers who support my wild and crazy dreams, and pay me money to draw cartoons. All of you are the best.

 AND YOU, Jonathan Blake, for interviewing me and for being so patient!

Are there any artists you’d recommend I follow and/or interview next?

There are too many great artists out there! I think it’s especially still important to study the old masters and learn from them. I’m out of touch with all the cool artist stuff happening (there’s so much going on all the time these days!) but maybe it’d be cool if you capitalized on CTN and had a meetup or some interview sessions or something there?

That being said, there’s a ton of cool people who work on PZ! Travis Blaise would be great to interview, I sit across from him at work and always pick his brain about his stories of being a Disney animator at the Florida studio in the '80s and '90s. Peter Paul is another great artist, he’s worked everywhere and knows all the good gossip, so he’d be good to interview as well. Hillary Bradfield boards on Penn Zero and would be another great person to interview! She’s hilarious and crazy talented.

How/where can people see your work?

I have a tumblr, which is often left tragically abandoned, at naomihicksart.tumblr.com. I also post dumb doodles on instagram: @spacecadetnaomi

Is there anything that you’re not doing now that you might like to try in the future?

I’d like to board again! I got to board one episode on our show and it was really fun. Boarding is more difficult than revisions, and takes more time, but it’s so much fun and you get a lot of control over the episode. I’ve still got more to learn, but our team is amazing and it’s a great environment to learn in! In the future I just wanna set the world on fire and inspire other artists to help build a positive, accepting environment in which we can all tell the best stories and encourage each other. Super cheesy, but my dream is to work on amazing projects that I can believe in with the people I love!

“Hi…!!!” is my happy Toothless piece for DreamWorks Dragons 2 Charity for the Children’s hospital curated by Tron Mai.  

The final image framed with matte is 5"x7".  For this painting, I used Winsor & Newton designer gouache – permanent yellow deep, grenadine, permanent green deep, ivory black, and permanent white (As always, I limit my pallete to split complementary); and painted on Sage Tiziano paper.

Gouache is one of my favorite medium to paint with.  With any traditional media, there’s always an element of happy accident and surprise that is super fun.  The best/worst part about it, is ‘there is NO control-z!’, so you cannot undo stuff!!!!  This actually makes me noodle less, because I have to commit into doing something otherwise there’s nothing on the paper.  And if I’m not happy with it, then I gotta move on and start over!  Scary yet liberating, and definitely therapeutic.  This is truly one of my hobby that I really enjoy.

Happy painting,
Griz

Okay, so if you’re wondering “Who is this Asari?” it’s Dr. Lexi T’Perro! If you didn’t know, she was voiced by Natalie Dormer (an actress I absolutely adore), but the developers made her face just look like every other default Asari they put in the game and I found it extremely lazy considering her voice actress is so beautiful! So, as a result I painted a Lexi with Natalie Dormer’s likeness instead. Dunno if I captured it as well as I’d like, but I like it a lot better than her default look, that’s for sure.

Here’s other portraits for the same series: Liara T’Soni , Peebee , Samara , Aria T’Loak , Shiala

More info: I decided I would start a little digital painting project to keep me artistically active for a while, so to celebrate the month of May my theme is:

“May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs”

I’ll just be painting a whole buncha beautiful blue (and purple… possibly green) Asari from the Mass Effect series!

Last Asari portrait I wanted to make time for before May was over was Shiala the Asari Commando! She starts out as a purple-skinned Asari, but her time under the control of the Thorian eventually turns her skin green in the sequel games, so she looks much like the Thorian-made clones you encounter of her in Feros in the first game. 

Here’s other portraits for the same series: Liara T’Soni , Peebee , Samara , Aria T’Loak , Dr. Lexi T’Perro  

I will probably make an image post to compile them all together for viewing ease now.

Anyhow, I think this about concludes the Asari series I wanted to do. I have a few more unrelated portraits of some RPG OCs I want to get around to eventually, but I wanna thank y’all for liking and sharing all of these Asari paintings for my “May-dens, May-trons, and May-triarchs” series this May. It means a lot to me that you like this stuff! :D