tribes at war

Just a reminder: there are still normies in the world.  Lots of them.  In fact, they probably still constitute a strong outright majority of the population, although the proportions are less overwhelming than they used to be*.

The fact that the public and semi-public conversation spaces are all filled with weird-ass warring tribes just tells you what sorts of people are really interested in carrying out public and semi-public conversations.


* at least within wealthy-ish more-or-less-cosmopolitan First World etc. societies

Celtic Gods and Goddess

The Celtic world included Ireland, Britain, and a large section of the mainland

Aine: Goddess of love and fertility; encouraged human love; has command over crops and animals; daughter of Eogabail  

Amaethon: God of agriculture 

Anu or Danu/Dana: Mother goddess 

Aonghus: God of love; son of Dagda and Boann

Badb: Irish goddess of battle; could influence the outcome of conflict by inspiring fear or bravery in warriors

Balor: The one-eyed god of death, everyone he looked upon was destroyed

Belenus or Bel: Sun god; appears throughout the Celtic world in different forms; Beltaine celebrates him 

Boann: Water goddess; mother of Aonghus

Brigantia: Chief goddess of Brigantes tribe; associated with water, war and healing

Brigid/Brigit: Goddess of healing and fertility; said to help women during labor; possibly same goddess as Brigantia 

Camulos: God of war mostly worshiped in Belgium areas; said to wield an invincible sword

Ceridwen: Goddess of fertility

Cernunnos: God of wild animals, forest, and plenty; possibly also the god of death; known as the horned one

Cliodhna: Goddess of beauty; her three birds could sing the sick to sleep and heal them 

Dagda: The great god; could restore the dead to life

Dian Cecht: God of healing 

Don: Welsh version of Dana

Donn: God of the dead

Dylan: Sea god

Epona: Horse goddess

The Formorii: Sea gods; violent and misshapen

Goibhniu: Smith god 

Lir: God of sea, healing  and magic 

Lugh: Sun god (Ireland)

Lugus:  Sun god (France and Britain) 

Mac Cecht: God of eloquence

Macha: One of the war goddess

Manannan Mac Lir: Sea god; could stir up or soothe the sea

Manawydan: Welsh sea god, extremely similar to Manannan

Morrigan/Morrigu: Goddess of death on the battlefield 

Nechtan: Water god 

Nemain: Goddess of war

Nemglan: Bird god

Nodens: God of healing; owned magic healing hounds

Ogma: God of eloquence; creating of Ogham, the oldest writing system in Ireland

Taranis: Name means thunderer; Romans equated him to Jupiter; symbol was the wheel

Teutates or Toutatis: Romans equated him to Mars

**Not all inclusive 

All information gathered from “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of World Mythology by Arthur Cotterell and Rachel Storm 

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“Ultimately, your story is yours to tell”

Korra: @uniquesora | Asami: @khyvacraft
Photography: @topheroriel

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*Under lake*

Long times ago, humans, monsters, and two tribes started to wage war,
The monsters were routed, and sealed on a deep lake at the top of the mountain.
Then the children who went to the lake were fascinated by something and lapsed into the lake, missing children again.

and a lot of time after …

(Underrain remake AU)

Polynesian AU stuff

So, I think I should start making theme posts for my Polynesian AU or as you like to call it Moana AU (both variants are welcome). Since many of you seemed pretty much interested in this story I’ll try to give you a brief idea of what this whole thing is about.

Sorry for my clumsy English :)

Timeline. The story is set about one and a half century after Maui stole Te Fiti’s heart and everything became hell. All the monsters released from Lalotai and darkness spreading quickly and destroying islands made many tribes search for safe areas to stay, and if they used to be more peaceful back then when the ocean was a safer place now they had to fight for their land and protect it from the newcomers. Overall, sailing wasn’t forbidden but people were slowly losing that special connection with the ocean their ancestry used to have.

Turtles. And that’s where we should start speaking about the turts. In this AU all four brothers (not blood-related) are sons of Tu - god of war in Polynesian mythology. There’s a legend (made up of course) that when the number of tribe wars and monster attacks increased other gods made Tu help the people. He decided to send his guardians which would protect people from Lalotai monsters and maybe prevent some war cases. Following what the legend tells the strongest of female sea turtles (turtles are considered to be a symbol of strength and war) gave their eggs to Tu and he placed them on small islands in different regions. One of those islands was our turtles’ birthplace.

Firstly, their names are different in this story. I tried to choose the most fitting ones.

  • Leo is a green sea turtle named Lono which means “peace and prosperity
  • Raph is a leatherback sea turtle named Rapa which means “giant”
  • Donnie is also a green sea turtle named Roro which means “brain” (there’s a lack of names and even words starting with D in Maori and Hawaiian languages so I had to put up with this variant, it isn’t half bad I think)
  • Mikey is a loggerhead sea turtle named Maika which means “good”

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This isn’t NEW Su-won Behaviour

I normally hate Su-won on a regular basis and he conflicts with my heart because one minute I want to hold him, the next I want to smack him, but right now I’m more surprised at other people’s reaction in regards to him denying Yona her request to not go to war. 

People seem to forget that this isn’t a change of character for him, he has always been like this. When one of the countries, can’t remember which, was in a battle with Kouka over a specific area, which at one point had been Kouka’s, this being the chapter the other dragons got ill because they were far away from Kouka, and I’m pretty sure this was the point in the series Zeno’s powers were revealed. Anyway, the casualty would have been that village regardless of the fact that Su-won had won because the enemy nation knew they were losing so they decided that they would go out fighting as the village would be Kouka’s and Kouka would have to deal with the damage. In wars that tended to be, rape, murder, and pillage. Had the HHB not been there, that village most likely would have suffered greatly and Su-won is no fool. He understands that there are consequences to his actions but he still does things regardless. That village, Yona and Hak’s relationship. He is willing to throw things away for the sake of his goals, even if those things will leave him being isolated, alone, and hated by the very people he once loved (or still does, his face this chapter looked very sad and hollow, like he wished there was another way but knows there isn’t).

Also, the fact he knows what his father did to Kouren, means that this was part of his plan all along. Long before Yona and the gang got involved. Regardless of the fact he is doing this for the apparent good of Kouka, Kouren’s people will suffer because of his actions, thus will only perpetuate the hatred for future generations if he keeps behaving this way. His desire for power and to keep the Kai empire at bay may result in his own downfall.

He wants to make Kouka great again, which I think may be his biggest mistake, especially in regards to the Wind tribe because there is no unity between them and the King. Su-won and company blamed Hak for what happened and then the fire tribe had the Wind’s water supply dammed in order to capture Yona and Hak and had the merchants almost killed (regardless of the fact the fire tribe did it, the sky tribe initiated the coup and were the masters behind it). They forced Hak to abandon his title and leave his only home and family behind. The Wind were forced into submission, had it been their choice, they would have fought Su-won and the fire tribe.

The Wind are loyal to each other, each member is a precious family member. Seriously, the fact that this war is most likely going to be fought in their territory means Su-won’s going to be majorly disadvantaged when Mundock and mini Hak are going to side with Yona, without question. The other tribes aren’t like the wind, loyalty isn’t just a pretty word to them that they will throw around whenever it’s convenient to them. It means something.

This chapter really makes me want to give everybody who has kept silent, a nice big smack in the face because even if Su-won did the killing, the other generals, and various people who knew about what he did are still being quite about it, even following the bastard.

The fact that our precious cinnamon roll blames himself for something he had no control over and was used makes me so upset. He became an accomplice of a crime he had no idea was going to happen to someone he respected and ended up hurting that man’s daughter, who he cared for. Major slap in the face and a punch to the gut, that is, considering the person who relayed the information to Su-won was someone who he trusted.

Yet Yona is trying to forgive which I give her major props. I would not be able to do something like that. I think a large part of that has to do with the fact that people hated her father, very few of them cared about him so why would they care about her and her wants, especially when you think of her request only really benefits her. It’s not like anyone in Kouka other than the obvious people will miss or care about the dragons. Su-won is right. he can’t prioritize Yona’s desires when he knows Kouren won’t just stop because even when Yona left she was planning on her strategy of attack. She knows it most likely won’t go well but is giving her a chance none the less most likely to teach her a lesson that a man like Su-won needs to be put down rather than talked too. 

This time the consequences are real and she is put in the middle. This will also be the first war Yona has been in, which will be quite traumatic for her as she will most likely see people she loves dies…(please let Mundock live, I want sexy badass grandpa to live and see his great grandbabies) anyway, this has in many ways put Yona back where she was without the dragons. This will be where all her skills in archery and with the sword are going to have to come to use. This is where Yona will fight beside Hak and hope fully in a moment of passion confess her undying love to him, or the other way around. That works too.


CAN’T WAIT FOR THE NEXT CHAPTER!!

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When the Romans invade Britain in 43AD, the tribes of Britain have to deal with these invaders as well as their own internal struggles. Kerra, daughter of the King of the Cantii, is at war with her arch-rival, Queen Antedia of the Regni. The strife between them began years ago, when, as a teenager Kerra was sent to marry Antedia’s son. Instead, on her wedding night, she castrated him, creating war between the two tribes. The desperate Queen will co-operate with anyone, even the Romans on condition they will hand over the Cantii Princess alive. While Kerra is hell bent taking full advantage of the divisions between the different warring tribes and spearheading the resistance against the Romans.

Kelly Reilly as Kerra in Britannia, the 9-part series will premiere in 2018 on Sky1 in the UK and Amazon Prime Video in the US [x] [x]

New entry into the Beast Codex - Griffins!

Description
Griffins are powerful winged Beasts with attributes similar to that of a feline and a bird of prey. Although exceptionally adaptable, they are associated with the broad lowlands and canyons known as the Spryhawk Valley where most live in large groups called tribes. Griffins are renowned for their capacity, courage and ferocious nature which stems from their warrior-focused culture. As such, a Griffins role in Abodes are usually delegated to fighters, tacticians or scouts.


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Sheev-Lursha - The Protector of Saxhleel Tradition

Argonians, or Saxhleel, are an oviparous race of reptilian people native to the large and marshy province known as Black Marsh, a region of Tamriel. They can be found in smaller numbers throughout the continent, and have been featured in every one of the main games thus far. Argonians are one of the few races completely unrelated to men and mer, being descended directly from the Hist. Enigmatic and intelligent, the Argonians are experts of guerrilla tactics, and their natural abilities suit their swampy homeland. They have developed immunities to diseases that have plagued many would-be explorers in the region, and they are capable of easily exploring underwater locations due to their ability to breathe water. Argonians also have some resistance to poison. They are also very capable warriors and archers due to their constant use of guerrilla warfare against Warring Tribes or Dunmer slavers.

Argonians start out in life as eggs; when a clutch of Argonian eggs is laid, they are placed near Hist trees in areas known as hatching pools. When the eggs hatch, they form a connection to the Hist. If, for whatever reason, this connection to the Hist is not present or is severed, the unborn within the eggs die. After being born, Argonian hatchlings drink the sap of the Hist and continue doing this through their infancy. According to them, the sap of the hist tree, when drank, gives a hatchling its soul. When that Argonian dies, his soul travels back to its Hist tree and is stored until another hatchling drinks that Hist. Thus, the Hist is giving it a soul, and so the cycle repeats. It is unknown if a hatchling would really have a soul of its own without receiving one from the Hist.

During the Oblivion Crisis, a powerful political faction known as the An-Xileel rallied the Argonians against the Daedra after the Battle of Kvatch. The An-Xileel were staunch Argonian traditionalists, tracing their ancestral ways back to the great Xanmeer civilization. It is also rumored that they of all the Argonian tribes have the strongest connection to the Hist and can receive knowledge and prophecies. When the Oblivion Gates opened in Black Marsh, the Daedra didn’t so much flood into Argonia as the Argonians did into Oblivion. The natives fought and defeated the Daedra on their own turf, doing so with such success that the Dremora lieutenants actually closed their Gates themselves to prevent being overrun, an occurrence unheard of in the other provinces. Thus, the An-Xileel held Black Marsh until Martin Septim ended the Oblivion Crisis and closed the Gates forever. They also made Black Marsh the first province to secede from the Empire after the Crisis ended, and initiated a brutal campaign of war against the Dunmer of Morrowind for the countless centuries of slave raids and Argonian servitude.

Confronting Anti-Black Racism in The Arab World (Important Read)


In response to an essay I wrote recently regarding the “essential blackness” of the Palestinian struggle, I received this reaction, among others: “What about Arab anti-black racism? Or the Arab slave trade?”

The Arab slave trade is a fact of history and anti-black racism is a fact of current reality, a shameful thing that must be confronted in Arab societies. Though I claim no expertise on the subject, I think that applying notions of racism as it exists in the US will preclude a real understanding of the subject in the Arab world.

I spent much of much of my youth in the Arab world and I do not recall having a race consciousness until I came to the United States at the age of 13. My knowledge of Arab anti-black racism comes predominantly from Arab Americans. Like other immigrant communities, they adopt the prevailing racist sentiments of the power structure in the US, which decidedly holds African-Americans in contempt.

This attitude is also becoming more prevalent in Arab countries for various reasons, but mostly because Arab governments, particularly those that import foreign labour from Africa and Southeast Asia, have failed to implement or enforce anti-discrimination and anti-exploitation laws.

In many Arab nations, including Kuwait where I was born, workers are lured into menial jobs where their passports are confiscated upon arrival and they are forced into humiliating and often inhuman working conditions. They have little to no protection under the law and are particularly vulnerable to exploitation, including extraordinarily long working hours, withholding of salaries, sexual, mental, and physical abuse, and denial of travel.

The recent case of Alem Dechesa brought to light the horrors faced by migrant workers in Lebanon. Dechesa, a domestic worker from Ethiopia, committed suicide after suffering terrible mental and physical abuse at the hands of her Lebanese employers, whose savage beating of her in front of the Ethiopian Consulate went viral last year.

Defining beauty

An extension to Arab anti-black racism is an aspiration to all that our former - and current - colonisers possess. Individuals aspire to what is powerful and rich, and the images of that power and wealth have light skin, straight hair, small noses, ruddy cheeks and tall, skinny bodies. That image rejects melanin-rich skin, coiled hair, broad or pointy noses, short stature, broad hips and big legs. So we, too, reject these features, despising them in others and in ourselves as symbols of inferiority, laziness, and poverty. That’s why the anglicising industries of skin bleaching and hair straightening are so profitable.

And yet, when Palestine went to the UN for recognition of statehood, the vast majority of nations who voted yes were southern nations. The same is true when Palestine asked for admission to UNESCO. In fact, when the US cut off funding to UNESCO in response to its members’ democratic vote to admit Palestine, it was the African nation of Gabon that immediately stepped up with a $2m donation to UNESCO to help offset the loss of income.

It was not Saudi Arabia, or Kuwait, or Qatar, or Lebanon, or Sweden, or France. It was Gabon. How many Palestinians know that, much less expressed gratitude for it?

So concerned are Palestinians with what the European Union and the United States think of us. So engrossed are we in grovelling for their favour and handouts as they support a system of Jewish supremacy pushing our ancient society into extinction. We dance like clowns any time a European leader spares us a thought. Have we no sense of history? No sense of pride? No comprehension of who is truly standing with us and who is sabotaging us?

In a world order that peddles notions of entire continents or regions as irreducible monoliths, the conversation among Arabs becomes a dichotomous “Arab” versus “African”, ignoring millennia of shared histories ranging from extensive trade and commerce, to the horrors of the Arab slave trade, to the solidarity of African-Arab anti-colonial unity, to the current state of ignorance that does not know history and cannot connect the dots when it comes to national liberation struggles.

Arab slave trade

When I was researching the subject of the Arab slave trade, I came upon a veritable treasure of a website established by The African Holocaust Society, or Mafaa [Swahili for “holocaust”], a non-profit organisation of scholars, artists, filmmakers, academics, and activists dedicated to reclaiming the narratives of African histories, cultures, and identities. Included in this great body of scholarly works is a comprehensive section on the Arab slave trade, as well as the Jewish slave trade, African-Arab relations over the centuries, and more, by Owen Alik Shahadah, an activist, scholar and filmmaker.

Reading this part of our shared history, we can see how a large proportion of Arabs, including those among us who harbour anti-black racism, are the sons and daughters of African women, who were kidnapped from Eastern African nations as sex slaves.

Unlike the European slave trade, the Arab slave trade was not an important feature of Arab economies and it predominantly targeted women, who became members of harems and whose children were full heirs to their father’s names, legacies and fortunes, without regard to their physical features. The enslaved were not bought and sold as chattel the way we understand the slave trade here, but were captured in warfare, or kidnapped outright and hauled across the Sahara.

Race was not a defining line and enslaved peoples were not locked into a single fate, but had opportunity for upward mobility though various means, including bearing children or conversion to Islam. No-one knows the true numbers of how many African women were enslaved by Arabs, but one need only look at ourselves to see the shadows of these African mothers who gave birth to us and lost their African identities.

But while African scholars at the Mafaa Society make important distinctions between the Arab and European slave trades, enslavement of human beings is a horror of incomprehensible proportions by any standard, and that’s what it was in the Arab world as it was - or is - anywhere. There are some who argue that the Arab slave traders were themselves indistinguishable from those whom they enslaved because the word “Arab” had cultural relevance, not racial.

One-way street

This argument goes hand-in-hand with the discredited excuse that Africans themselves were involved in the slave trade, with warring tribes capturing and selling each other. But no matter how you look at it, the slave trade was a one-way street, with Africans always the enslaved victims. I know of no African tribe that kidnapped Europeans and put them in bondage for generations; nor do I know of an African tribe that captured Arab women for centuries and made them sex slaves.

I think humanity has truly never known a holocaust of greater magnitude, savagery, or longevity than that perpetrated against the peoples of Africa. This Mafaa has never been fully acknowledged and certainly never atoned for - not that the wounds or enduring legacies of turning human beings into chattel for centuries can ever be fully comprehended or atoned for. But one must try, because just as we inherit privilege from our ancestors, so do we inherit their sins and the responsibility for those sins.

Gaddafi’s role

The late Colonel Muammar Gaddafi understood this and he used his power and wealth to try to redeem our shared history. He was the first Arab leader to apologise on behalf of Arab peoples to our African brothers and sisters for the Arab slave trade and the Arab role in the European slave trade.

He funnelled money into the African Union and used Libya’s wealth to empower the African continent and promote pan-Africanism. He was a force of reconciliation, socialism, and empowerment for both African and Arab peoples. Gaddafi’s actions threatened to renew African-Arab reconciliation and alliances similar to that which occurred at the height of the Non-Aligned Movement during the presidencies of Jamal Abdel Nasser of Egypt and Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.  

Thus, NATO’s urgency to prevent “massacres” and “slaughter” in Libya was manufactured and sold wholesale. The fear of African-Arab solidarity can be seen in the way the US-backed Libyan insurgency spread rumours that “black African” mercenaries were committing atrocities against Libyans. Gaddafi became an even bigger threat when an agreement was reached with the great anti-imperialist force in South America, Hugo Chavez, to mediate a solution to the uprising in Libya.

Now both of these champions of their people are gone, and the so-called Libyan revolutionaries are executing “black Africans” throughout the country. Gone, too, is NATO’s worry about slaughter in Libya, and another high-functioning Arab nation lies in ruin, waste and civil strife - primed for rampant corporate looting.

I wrote previously that the Palestinian struggle against the erasure of our existence, history and identity was spiritually and politically black in nature. So, too, are other struggles, like that of migrant workers throughout many Arab nations. These are our comrades. They are the wretched, exploited, robbed, and/or, at last, liberated.

I refer to Black as a political term, not necessarily a racial or ethnic descriptor. In the words of Owen Alik Shehadah: “Black People is a construction which articulates a recent social-political reality of people of colour (pigmented people). Black is not a racial family, an ethnic group or a super-ethnic group. Political Blackness is thus not an identity but moreover a social-political consequence of a world which after colonialism and slavery existed in those colour terms. The word "Black” has no historical or cultural association, it was a name born when Africans were broken down into transferable labour units and transported as chattel to the Americas.“

But that word has been reclaimed, redefined, and injected with all the power, love, defiance, and beauty that is Africa. For the rest of us, and without appropriating the word, "black” is a phenomenon of resistance, steadfastness - what we Palestinians call sumud - and the beauty of culture that is reborn out of bondage and oppression.

Right to look the other way

Finally, solidarity from Africans is not equivalent to that which comes from our European comrades, whose governments are responsible for the ongoing erasure of Palestine. African peoples have every reason to look the other way. Ethiopians have every reason to say: “You deserve what you get for the centuries of enslavement and neo-enslavement industry by your Arab neighbours.” African Americans have every reason to say: “Why should I show solidarity with Arabs who come here to treat us like white people do, and sometimes worse?”

Malcolm X once said: “If I was that [anti-American], I’d have a right to be that - after what America has done to us. This government should feel lucky that our people aren’t anti-American.”

We can substitute the word “Arab” for “American” in that sentence and it would be a valid statement. And yet, Africa is right there with us. African American intellectuals are the greatest champions of our struggle in the United States. The impact of solidarity from four particular individuals - Desmond Tutu, Alice Walker, Angela Davis and Cynthia McKinney - can never be overestimated.

Last month, the former South African ambassador to Israel refused a “certificate” from Israel confirming the planting of trees in his name. In his letter, he called Israel a racist, apartheid state and said the gift was an “offence to my dignity and integrity”. He added: “I was not a party to, and never will be, to the planting of ‘18 trees’, in my 'honour’, on expropriated and stolen land.”

I would like my countrymen to think long and hard about this until they truly comprehend the humbling beauty of this solidarity from people who have every reason to be anti-Arab. I wish my countrymen could look through my eyes. They would see that black is profoundly beautiful. They would see that Africa runs through our veins, too. Our enslaved African foremothers deserve to be honoured and loved by their Arab children. And it is for us to redeem their pain with the recognition and atonement long owed.

Arriving at this understanding is a good starting place for reciprocal solidarity with nations and peoples who are standing with us, in heart and in action.

…….

Susan Abulhawa is a Palestinian writer and the author of the international bestselling novel, Mornings in Jenin (Bloomsbury 2010). She is also the founder of Playgrounds for Palestine, an NGO for children.

Follow her on Twitter: @sjabulhawa

Source: Al Jazeera 

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The Arabic Slave Trade is something that is rarely spoken about and often goes unheard of. When we speak of the enslavement of Africans, many of us like to connect it with Europeans, which is fine, but we should never forget they were not the only ones. For over 900 years, Africans were enslaved by Arabic slave traders. They would take Africans from all over the continent including West, East, and North Africa forcing them to march thousands of miles to Slave Markets. The Men, Women, and Children were bound together by the waist and neck so that if one died the rest could drag him or her along. These walks became known as the “Death Marches” and an estimated 20 million Africans died on these walks alone. The Arabs believed it was God’s wish to see Africans enslaved and believed they were uncivilized animals. Sound Familiar? Slaves were beaten and abused regularly. Many African Women, young Girls, and Boys would be used as Sex slaves for their owners. Islamic Slave holders would stick their swords and other weapons into the Vagina’s of Black Women and cut off the penis of African Men. This was done because they believed Africans had an uncontrollable sex drive. Many Africans would be forced to convert to Islam believing if they shared the same religion, it would stop the abuse. Muslim slave traders would also promise them Freedom after conversion. This did not stop the abuse nor did it gain them their freedom. In Fact, one can argue it made them even more enslaved. When Europeans entered the slave industry, Muslim Slave traders would use the religion to exploit Islamic Africans to bring them other Africans. These Africans would then be sold to Europeans. Slavery in the holy city of Mecca would not be outlawed until 1966 and in all other Arabic countries until 1990. The Islamic Slave Trade began almost 500 years before the Europeans would come to Africa. It would be a catalyst for the dismantling of the continent and the massive expansion of the Religion. Had it not been for Islam, European Chattel Slavery may never have occurred. History is quite a teacher and once again as the late Dr. John Henrik Clarke once said, “Africa has no friends. If you want a friend, look in the mirror.”

Written by @KingKwajo - Via: SanCopha League

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DRIVER EIGHT AND THE CARRION KID

I drew a couple of old mad max fury road ocs for the first time today after @carrionkid‘s new URL reminded me of their existence. Witness Driver Eight and the Carrion Kid, a team of war boys known for making long distance trips for the Immortan in their tricked out post apocalyptic Prius. 

Eight’s a oligodactyl black thumb gearhead with a passion for some action, Kid’s an apprentice of the Organic Mechanic who carries bandages around his neck, feathers on his arms, and a chip on his shoulder. The two of them together are a terrible buddy comedy waiting to happen.