tribal african

anonymous asked:

How do you HC courts ethnicity/race/features wise?

Night court - mixed. They’re very diverse. White, tanned, darker brown, all skin tones you can find. And with different facial features also. Women dressed in crop tops and long skirts. But I HC Illyrians as Middle eastern or Latino or Polynesian. I haven’t decided yet. But definitely tanned. And they dress in leathers

Day court - dark skin. African tribal style clothing and makeup/body paint (idk how it’s called but you know what I mean)

Dawn court - Indian or Egyptian skin tone, features, clothing and makeup

Spring court - white with all hair and eye colours

Autumn court - white with also different hair colours but mostly ginger

Summer court - dark skin. And I HC that they wear light colours. White, light blue pink and yellow. And I HC them as super sophisticated for some reason idk how to explain

Winter court - East Asian features, super pale, all dressed in white and grey

Suri mother and children

Location: Kibish, Omo Valley, Ethiopia

Photographer: Fabio Marcato

Surma is the official Ethiopian umbrella term for three ethnic groups in South Ethiopia: the Suri people, the Mursi people and the Mekan people. Very often the name ‘Surma’ is used for the Suri people as well, but this is wrong, a Suri would never call himself a 'Surma’. The Suri people are semi-nomadic cattle herders and live on the west side of the Omo River in the southwestern part of Ethiopia. This area is still much undeveloped, only an unpaved road leads to the heart of the Suri settlements: Kibish. 

Fulani noblewoman with tattooed lips and gold earrings, from a large semi-nomadic pastoral settlement

Fulani (Peul, Fulbe, Fula) women of this region often tattoo their lips, gums and the area around the mouth before marriage, a painful aesthetic practice and rite of passage signifying marital status. The extravagant gold earrings or “kwottenai kanye” symbolize the wealth and prestige of a husband or family based largely on the ownership of cattle among the semi-nomadic pastoral Fulani of this region. The earrings are also an aesthetic symbol of cultural pride and identity. They are usually a gift from a husband to his wife or an heirloom passed on to a daughter on the death of her mother. The large earrings are made by local smiths or artisans concentrated mostly in the Mopti region of northern Mali. They are crafted from a 14-karat bar of gold that is first chiseled and heated over a fire, then hammered into thin blades and twisted into a four-lobe shape.

Location: Mopti, Mali

Photographer: David Schweitzer

During a dance, Muslim girls from the Sultanate of Tadjoura, dress up in all their finery and display the curved daggers of their men

Photographer: Nigel Pavitt

Location: Tadjoura, Djibouti

At dinner my racist uncle saw my legs twitching from an intense buttcrack itch and accused me of performing a tribal African dance and threw scalding hot gravy over my head. I hate being the token liberal in such an intolerant family.