triarch

What a supporter Malaquo Maegyr, the current ruling triarch of the Tiger, would wear, Gucci.

Volantis is ruled by there elected officials of the City who are called triarchs, they are neither kings nor princes, and any freeborn landholder, regardless of gender can vote for a triarch, who are chosen from amongst those noble families who can prove unbroken descent from Valyria. A triarch’s term lasts for one year. However, a triarch may run for re-election for the post as many times as they wish. The elections last for ten days at the beginning of each new year, and Volantis becomes filled with torchlight marches, speeches, mummers and minstrels and dancers, bravos fighting duels for the honor of their candidates, elephants with the names of would-be triarchs painted on their sides. Some candidates have slave girls and boys lay with voters to win votes. The triarchs are considered so elevated that their feet are not allowed to touch the ground during their year of service, instead, they ride everywhere atop elephants.

Triarch Praetorians are the former bodyguards and agents of the Triarch, the ruling council of the Necrontyr. Now, they are Necron rapid-assault infantry equipped with anti-gravitational packs. As of late M41 they have pledged their loyalty to the newly returned Silent King, and seek to unify the Necrons in the face of the Tyranid threat.

What the Widow of the Waterfront would have worn in her youth, Anita Dongre

The widow of the waterfront is a very old woman who runs several docks, piers and shipping lanes in a section of western Volantis. She was once a former pleasure slave taught the ways of the seven sighs in Yunkai. She was purchased by a Triarch of Volantis named Vogarro, who later fell in love with her and freed her, raising a great scandal amongst the nobility by marrying her. Vogarro owned piers, storehouses, brokered cargoes, changed money and insured shipowners against the hazards of the sea and when he died thirty-two years ago she took over his business. She had to sell his manse because no freedman may live within the Black Wall in eastern Volantis, where only those with blood tracing back to Old Valyria may live. She took up residence at the Merchant’s House west of the Rhoyne. The aristocracy of eastern Volantis refer to her as Vogarro’s whore, though not to her face.

Daenerys and Qarth: Third Time’s the Charm

It’s no secret that Daenerys has a special relationship with the number three. This is most overt in the personal, prophetic and the miraculous aspects of her journey: she is third born, a child of three, comes to possess three dragon eggs/dragons, will light three fires, ride three mounts, suffer three treacheries, and the dragon has three heads. But the number three frequently reoccurs in the more mundane story as well: three hostile khals, three loyal Bloodriders, three Seekers, three unfaithful Pureborn, three (unhelpful) Qartheen trading associations, three Pentosi ships, three attempts to secure an army, three Slaver cities, three Storm Crow commanders, three pickled heads from Mantarys, three surviving Dornishmen, three warlocks in the service of Euron III, three hostile Volantene Triarchs, three Westerosi passengers aboard the Selaesori Qhoran, three thralls to blow the dragon horn for third-born Victarion, and three remaining hostages in the Yunkish camp (as Dany herself bemoans, so many threes). In the more important groups of three a third event or person breaks from the first two. The third Seeker Quaithe actually gives Daenerys helpful advice, the third attempt at gaining an army in Astapor is successful, the third Storm Crow commander turns his cloak, Dany decides to stay and rule the third slaver city, one of her three dragons bonds with her and flies off, and so on.

Now, this special relationship isn’t all that useful when it comes to interpreting the narrative and making predictions. For the most part this is a pattern that reveals itself as the story unfolds, to be enjoyed in hindsight. The number three might be a reoccurring, symbolically important feature of Daenerys’ storyline, but we have little idea how it will reoccur absent heavy foreshadowing, nor how important its manifestations will be to the overall narrative (these details are all locked up in Martin’s head). There is however one case where we actually do have some rather heavy foreshadowing whose narrative importance is fairly obvious once uncovered. This foreshadowing has to do with the fate of Qarth.

Given Dany’s special relationship with the number three, it seems fairly significant that Qarth has three great walls and three great gates that would have to be overcome in order for the city to be captured. It is equally significant that Dany has so far had two formal audiences in which she dressed up in Qartheen fashion, one with the Pureborn and one with Xaro (who in addition to representing the Thirteen was also serving as Qarth’s ambassador). She has also had two personal encounters with Xaro Xhoan Daxos.* A third audience with the Qartheen and a third encounter with Xaro would be the result of Daenerys burning down Qarth’s three gates and sacking the city. The whole city is therefore symbolically setup for her violent return.

*whose name makes him one big walking three, amusingly enough.

What the widow of the waterfront would have worn in her youth, Jean Paul Gaultier.

 The widow of the waterfront was once a former pleasure slave taught the ways of the seven sighs in Yunkai. She was purchased by a Triarch of Volantis named Vogarro. Vogarro fell in love with her and freed her, raising a great scandal by marrying her. Vogarro owned piers, storehouses, brokered cargoes, changed money and insured shipowners against the hazards of the sea, when he died 32 years ago she took over his business and now days she  runs several docks, piers and shipping lanes in a section of western Volantis.   Now days she is an old lady, she has scar tissue which covers her cheeks, from where she had the slave tattoos cut off upon being freed. The aristocracy of eastern Volantis refer to her as Vogarro’s whore, though not to her face.