treaties of rights

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Indigenous women of Standing Rock issue heartbreaking plea for help ahead of evacuation

  • With just over a day to go before the evacuation deadline arrives at North Dakota’s Oceti Sakowin camp, protesters at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation have issued a plea: Come help — now.
  • In a viral video shared by journalist Shaun King on Monday, a group of indigenous women remind viewers that demonstrations against the Dakota Access pipeline are about much more than a single issue.
  • They’re about clean water, police brutality, treaty rights and the rights of future generations. Read more (2/21/17 8:00 AM)

follow @the-movemnt

I am so sick of the misinformation going around about Standing Rock. To begin with DAPL was set to go through a town called Bismarck, a town that is mostly white. The people of this town expressed concern for the pipeline leaking, and said they didn’t want it.

When the pipleline was re-routed, it was set up to go through land that belongs to the Standing Rock Sioux. For those who don’t know what I mean by “belongs to” because “Oh me oh my, this is American land,” no, it isn’t. Not all of it. There is land that belongs to different Native tribes. Including part of the land that the pipeline will be going through. This was not done with permission. How was this done? This was done by bulldozing up the graves of ancestors. (If that doesn’t bother you, read it as the graves of our veterans; the graves of our presidents’ families; the graves of your family.)

Outside of the media finally watching us for the last six months, the camps have been there before that. I know someone who was there on April 1, 2016. That’s well before the media started paying attention in August. Well before. The camps have been self-sustaining. Yes, there have been donations. Yes, donations were made in physical items, money for items, and money for legal funds. That money and those items went to keeping something beautiful alive.

People who were arrested had numbers written on their arms, they were kept in dog cages. Protectors who were peacefully in prayer had untrained dogs set on them to attack. There are photos floating around of one trainer who couldn’t keep her dog, who had blood in its mouth, under control. In sub-zero conditions in the early morning protectors were hosed down with freezing water - this includes the elderly and children. (Yes, there were children. Guess what, they were getting schooled there. Self sustaining.) Police shot bean bags, rubber bullets, and flash-bang bombs into the crowds. A woman had her arm blown to pieces because of this. 

At every point since the beginning, there has only been peace on our end. No rioting, no fire, no weapons, no alcohol, no drugs; nothing but peace. And from the end of law enforcement has been violence. Even residents had been violent, and police did nothing to them. But they sure as hell arrested people from camp for praying - a nonviolent act.

If you are not Native, you don’t get to dictate what happens on our lands. I don’t give a damn if the government does. The government is breaking a treaty right now, ignoring tribal sovereignty. Just because they do it, does not mean you get to. I don’t care how tired you are of hearing about it. We’re tired of having our lands stolen and having our rights violated. 

I keep seeing tweets like “okay so america is a dystopian novel now wheres the 16 year old girl to save us” and other condescending shit like that and i just….

where are the girls who are saving us you ask?

oh i don’t know, they are at the Oceti Sakowin camp fighting for the right to clean water and treaty rights. They are protecting their land and water against heavily militarized police forces.

They are and have been at many Black Lives Matter protests. Girls have fought against police brutality in black communities. Women, in fact, are among the top leaders of that movement.

They are the muslim girls who continue to fearlessly wear their hijabs in public despite rampant islamophobia.

And there were plenty of teenage girls at the women’s marches across the country. 

So while a single Katniss Everdeen figure has yet to emerge, that doesn’t mean she doesn’t exist. Because young women are protesting every day. They are the Katnisses and the Laia of Serras and the Aelins and the Mare Barrows and the Nehemia Ytgers and the Lihn Cinders that you’ve all read about. These girls exist. 

Realize that the fallacy of most dystopians, and many books, is that they often presents a single cohesive narrative of revolt and change. And in our huge, wide world, that is not how change works. But the books themselves are not incorrect in assuming that young women will be the arbiters of change. They are spot fucking on. 

4

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

Supporters have said that running the pipeline under under a part of the Missouri River known as Lake Oahe would jeopardize the primary water source for the reservation, and construction would damage sacred sites, violating tribal treaty rights. The river crossing is the last major piece of the pipeline that remains unfinished.

PHOTOS: The Final Hours Of A Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp

Photos: Angus Mordant for NPR

youtube

Pleasing to the ears: Edward Hardwicke reading “The Naval Treaty”. :) He also reads “The Adventure of the Crooked Man” and “The Greek Interpreter”! How I love his voice and (like everything with these two) wish there were more recordings!

NO SPIRITUAL SURRENDER

There was a reported 8-10 arrests yesterday at Oceti. What mainstream media failed to recognize is that a vast majority if not ALL of those arrested were independent & grassroots media taking a stand for the camp, and refusing to allow corporation controlled law enforcement to seize the camp with no documentation. Exercising the 1st amendment, and defending the liberties of this country, this is now a war of information as well as a spiritual war.

There is still independent media embedded inside the camp, and they will continue to defend the right to document for treaty rights and the rights of our Native American brothers and sisters.

WE ARE THE MEDIA NOW.

-Redhawk

xsonnydelavegax  asked:

Hi, I'm writing a story that has a Native (Cherokee) mc. In my story, 70 years into the future, America is trying to rebuild itself after losing WW3, and isn't the safest place to live. My mc' s parents want her to be successful and able to leave America, so they send her to a boarding school in London, where she studies engineering in hopes of getting a job and enough money to get her parents out of America. I wanted to know how to avoid making the school seem like an assimilation school?

Sending a Cherokee Protagonist Away to School and Possible Assimilation Issues

I’m going to tell you something you probably don’t want to hear: there is no way to avoid making this look like an assimilation school, because the plot is built on assimilation and places assimilation as not only necessary, but preferable.

Indigenous groups from around the world have, indeed, sent their children to Western schools because their home was in danger. Many anthropological interpreters, who have lent the best data because they lived in two worlds, are such children. Many negotiators for treaty rights, stopping further colonialism, and teachers are more such children. Every example I could name— and sadly names other than Princess Ka'iulani and Francis La Flesche are escaping me— have the children return to the nation so they can try and negotiate with colonizers, and/or work with anthropologists to preserve culture. They are viewed as a necessary sacrifice in order to survive long term.

Children are so, so, so prized in Indigenous cultures. They are our future, and our societies have fallen apart because our children have been taken away. We try to keep our children close (unless trauma over generations of forced assimilation makes us think it’s for the best our children assimilate, but that is a plot non-Natives should not touch), so sending a child so far away, where there is no hope of them being able to continue their culture, is a level of hopelessness I cannot articulate. Having the goal be to take the parents away is even worse. When everything we do is to protect our ancestral lands, throwing that away is inconceivable to an Indigenous person.

And there lies the crux of why this story has an inescapable assimilation plot. When Indigenous groups send their children away, they do so in order for the children to come back partially assimilated and help protect their home. Natives do not have the concept of giving up their ancestral lands willingly. Every single resistance movement since colonization began has been built on the exact opposite, which is to stay on our homelands as long as humanly possible. Despite everything colonizers have tried to do to have us leave, we refuse to.

You cannot escape the assimilation plot you have, should you choose to go on this course. Read the story of Queen Liliʻuokalani and Princess Ka'iulani. Read the story of Francis La Flesche. Read them as told by their people. Those stories are the narratives for why we send our children away. It is not to help our parents escape. It is to help our lands remain as ours.

~ Mod Lesya

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ViewPoint | Trudeau’s Indigenous betrayal

OPINION: Pam Palmater says Justin Trudeau forgot his promises to First Nations after he was elected prime minister

I love Padmé Amidala. She’s brave, passionate, and compassionate. She’s an amazing public speaker and a crack shot who’s not afraid to put her life on the line for her ideals. She’s a literal queen who ended a centuries-old conflict between her people and the Gungans, saved her planet, and looked amazing doing it. It would be pretty easy to imagine she’s perfect, especially in comparison to her human disaster of a husband. She isn’t though and her flaws are an essential piece of her character.  They are what make her so compelling and so relatable.  So, what are they?

  • Privilege. Padmé comes from a place of incredible privilege, especially in contrast to characters like Anakin. She grew up on a prosperous Mid Rim world in a wealthy, if not aristocratic, family which owned at least two homes, one of which was a huge lake-side villa. As queen and later senator, she has power to effect the fates of billions (and more), as well as servants, bodyguards, fabulous clothes, and a private ship. This woman has benefited mightily from the GFFA’s political and economic system. In TPM she is frustrated by system’s inability to address her needs in a timely manner, but she never feels victimized or betrayed by it.  Padmé sympathizes with the plight of the oppressed, but she never really takes the time to question the structures which cause their suffering or her role within those systems. 
  • Hubris. Padmé freed her planet from invaders at age 14 and saw herself as a savior from that point on. Throughout the films and the Clone Wars series, she puts herself in danger convinced that only she (and occasionally her friends) can save that person, negotiate that treaty, right that wrong.  Sometimes she’s right and it works, but just as often someone ends up dead.
  • Rose Colored Glasses. Padmé tries so hard to see the best in everyone she often overlooks things that are actually problems.  Anakin and Palpitine are the most obvious examples, but there are several more from the Clone Wars series. She also does this with the Republic as a whole, right up until it all goes to hell.
Fight to Save Tribal Libraries


On March 16, 2017, President Donald Trump released his Budget Blueprint for 2018, also known as the “America First” budget. This proposed budget eliminates funding for IMLS, a federal agency that provides critical support for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian libraries across the country.

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) is calling on all tribal librarians, archivists, community members, and the public to share stories to help us fight for continued federal funding for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). We are seeking short stories from your communities to demonstrate the role tribal libraries play in supporting culture, community, and education. Use this form to share your story and upload any photos to accompany your story.

Funding for Native American libraries and information services has been a long struggle for those committed to the development of libraries in Indian Country since the 1970s. Strong and consistent advocacy from American Indian leaders helped to secure federal funding that would be used by tribes, for tribes, to meet their library and information needs. Vine Deloria, Jr. and other American Indian leaders have reminded us that the federal support of tribal library services is a function of Indian treaty rights as tribes sacrificed land and resources in exchange for educational services.

Our communities stand to lose millions in federal support for childhood literacy, language revitalization, digital infrastructure, college and vocational prep, job-seeking support, and so much more. In some cases, IMLS provides the only consistent source of library funding.

In a very real way, the defunding of IMLS could mean the loss of tribal libraries.

abcnews.go.com
Trump administration withdrew memo that found 'ample legal justification' to halt Dakota Access pipeline
The legal opinion was withdrawn two days before an easement was approved.
By ABC News

Two days before the Trump administration approved an easement for the Dakota Access pipeline to cross a reservoir near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation, the U.S. Department of the Interior withdrew a legal opinion that concluded there was “ample legal justification” to deny it.

The withdrawal of the opinion was revealed in court documents filed this week by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the same agency that requested the review late last year.

“A pattern is emerging with [the Trump] administration,” said Jan Hasselman, an attorney representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “They take good, thoughtful work and then just throw it in the trash and do whatever they want to do.”

The 35-page legal analysis of the pipeline’s potential environmental risks and its impact on treaty rights of the Standing Rock Sioux and other indigenous tribes was authored in December by then-Interior Department Solicitor Hilary C. Tompkins, an Obama appointee who was – at the time – the top lawyer in the department.

“The government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Tribes calls for enhanced engagement and sensitivity to the Tribes’ concerns,” Tompkins wrote. “The Corps is accordingly justified should it choose to deny the proposed easement.”

Tompkins’ opinion was dated Dec. 4, the same day the Obama administration announced that it was denying an easement for the controversial crossing and initiating an environmental impact statement that would explore alternative routes for the pipeline. Tompkins did not respond to a request by ABC News to discuss her analysis or the decision made to withdraw it.

On his second weekday in office, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum that directed the Army Corps of Engineers to “review and approve” the pipeline in an expedited manner, to “the extent permitted by law, and as warranted, and with such conditions as are necessary or appropriate.” “I believe that construction and operation of lawfully permitted pipeline infrastructure serve the national interest,” Trump wrote in the memo.

Two weeks later, the Corps issued the easement to Dakota Access and the environmental review was canceled.

The company behind the pipeline project now estimates that oil could be flowing in the pipeline as early as March 6.

The analysis by Tompkins includes a detailed review of the tribes’ hunting, fishing and water rights to Lake Oahe, the federally controlled reservoir where the final stretch of the pipeline is currently being installed, and concludes that the Corps “must consider the possible impacts” of the pipeline on those reserved rights.

“The Tompkins memo is potentially dispositive in the legal case,” Hasselman said. “It shows that the Army Corps [under the Obama administration] made the right decision by putting the brakes on this project until the Tribe’s treaty rights, and the risk of oil spills, was fully evaluated.”

Tompkins’ opinion was particularly critical of the Corps’ decision to reject another potential route for the pipeline that would have placed it just north of Bismarck, North Dakota, in part because of the pipeline’s proximity to municipal water supply wells.

“The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservations are the permanent and irreplaceable homelands for the Tribes,” Tompkins wrote. “Their core identity and livelihood depend upon their relationship to the land and environment – unlike a resident of Bismarck, who could simply relocate if the [Dakota Access] pipeline fouled the municipal water supply, Tribal members do not have the luxury of moving away from an environmental disaster without also leaving their ancestral territory.”

Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the project, has said that “concerns about the pipeline’s impact on local water supply are unfounded” and “multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route.”

The decision to temporarily suspend Tompkins’ legal opinion two days before the easement was approved was outlined in a Feb. 6 internal memorandum issued by K. Jack Haugrud, the acting secretary of the Department of the Interior. A spokeswoman for the department told ABC News today that the opinion was suspended so that it could be reviewed by the department.

The Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes are continuing their legal challenges to the pipeline. A motion for a preliminary injunction will be heard on Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

The Corps has maintained, throughout the litigation, that it made a good faith effort to meaningfully consult with the tribes.

The tribes contend, however, that the Trump administration’s cancellation of the environmental review and its reversal of prior agency decisions are “baldly illegal.”

“Agencies can’t simply disregard their own findings, and ‘withdrawing’ the Tompkins memo doesn’t change that,” Hasselman said. “We have challenged the legality of the Trump administration reversal and we think we have a strong case.”

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

The status of the Mother in Islam 🌺🌸

Mothers hold a high status in the religion of Islam contrary to the Pre-Islamic days where mothers could be inherited and enslaved by their own children. When the Holy Prophet Muhammad (ﷺ) began his prophethood, he banned this evil practise and taught his followers that respect begins at home with your own mother. 

.  Allah (ﷻ) said ❝ We have enjoined on man and woman to be good to his/her parents; show gratitude to Me and to thy parents; to Me is (thy final) Goal.❞

📔 Qur’an 31:14


. The Holy Prophet (ﷺ) said ❝Paradise lies at the feet of your mothers.❞

📔 Sunan an-Nasa’i


. Imam as-Sadiq (عليه السلام) said: ❝Once a person came to the Prophet (ﷺ) and asked him about good treatment to parents. Then, he said ‘Treat kindly your mother, treat kindly your mother, and treat kindly your mother; be kind to your father, be kind to your father, and be kind to your father but begin (that kindness) with your mother before your father’.❞

📔 Al-Kafi 


. Narrated Abu Usaid Saidi: ❝We were sitting with the Messenger of God (ﷺ) when a man came up to him and said ❝Oh Messenger of God, do my parents have rights over me now that they are dead?❞ The Holy Prophet replied ❝Yes you must pray to God so that He may bless them with His forgiveness and mercy, fulfil any promises they made to anyone and respect their relations and friends.❞
📔  Ibn Majah


. Imam Zainulabedin (عليه السلام) said ❝Then the right of your mother is that you should know that she carried you where no one carries anyone, and she fed you with the fruit of her heart - that which no one feeds anyone, and she protected you with her hearing and sight, and her hands and legs, and her hair and skin and all her other organs. She was highly delighted to do so. She was happy and eager, enduring the harm and the pains, and the heaviness and the grief until the Mighty Hand expelled you out of her and delivered you out to the Earth.

She did not care if she went hungry as long as you ate, and if she was naked as long as you were clothed, and if she was thirsty as long as you drank, and if she was in the sun as long as you were in the shade, and if she was miserable as long as you were happy, and if she was deprived of sleeping as long as you were resting. And her abdomen was your abode, and her lap was your seat, and her breast was your supply of drink, and her soul was your fort. She protected you from the heat and the cold of this world. Then you should thank her for all that. You will not be able to show her gratitude unless through God’s help and His granting you success.❞

📔  The Treaty of Rights


. Imam Mahdi (عليه السلام) said “For me there is no better role model or inspiration than my mother Lady Fatima Zahra (سلام الله علیها‎‎).”

📔 Bihar al-Anwar

Reasons I love my nerdsquad.

Response to Donald the Trump’s “whatever we can do to help” tweet.

[04/06 01:05] Moi: What can you do to help Donald?
[04/06 01:06] Moi: How about you quit destabilising the world economy, fracturing long standing diplomatic relationships, breaking up treaties and lubing Russia?
[04/06 01:08] Moi: No individual or nation can prevent random acts of terror. But from a power position making the world a better, safer place all around would be a great start
[04/06 01:08] Moi: Oh and quit arming sides in wars tht aren’t yours
[04/06 01:08] Moi: You fuck
[04/06 01:08] Pez: and while you’re at it, tone down the fake tan
[04/06 01:09] PJ: Go drink some covfefe

Sir Climber would like to extend a greeting and show you his best crossed-paws of manners! He thinks the sticky frogs are quite brave for taking treaties right from the pink tree and sends a bucket of crickets.

Hi Sir Climber! 😀🐸🐱
The Stickyfrogs are very impressed with your polite Manners! You have even managed to nap with your Manners!
Tiny likes your sticky-up ear-radar you are wearing just to make sure you don’t miss any treaties!
The Stickyfrogs say thank you for the bucket of treaties and they send you many kissies and a big hug! 😊🐸😀

theguardian.com
Over 70 arrested at Standing Rock as Dakota Access aims to finish pipeline
North Dakota police arrested 76 people one day after federal officials suggested that the government could soon approve the final stage of pipeline construction
By Sam Levin

North Dakota police have arrested 76 people at Standing Rock one day after federal officials suggested that the government could soon approve the final stage of construction of the Dakota Access pipeline.

The arrests occurred after a group of activists, who call themselves water protectors, established a new camp near the pipeline construction.

Rob Keller, spokesman for the Morton County sheriff’s office, told the Guardian on Wednesday night that it was too soon to say what charges were being filed. In a statement, he claimed that a “rogue group of protesters” had trespassed on private property.

“A lot of water protectors really felt that we needed to make some sort of stand as far as treaty rights,” said Linda Black Elk, a member of the Catawba Nation. “We basically started to see police mobilizing from all directions. Someone came along and told us we had about 15 minutes before the camp would get raided.”

Black Elk, who works with the Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council, said there were initially hundreds of activists at the new camp but that those who did not want to be taken into custody ultimately decided to retreat.

“There were a lot of people who felt like the prospect of treaty rights was something worth getting arrested over,” she said.