treaties of rights

I am so sick of the misinformation going around about Standing Rock. To begin with DAPL was set to go through a town called Bismarck, a town that is mostly white. The people of this town expressed concern for the pipeline leaking, and said they didn’t want it.

When the pipleline was re-routed, it was set up to go through land that belongs to the Standing Rock Sioux. For those who don’t know what I mean by “belongs to” because “Oh me oh my, this is American land,” no, it isn’t. Not all of it. There is land that belongs to different Native tribes. Including part of the land that the pipeline will be going through. This was not done with permission. How was this done? This was done by bulldozing up the graves of ancestors. (If that doesn’t bother you, read it as the graves of our veterans; the graves of our presidents’ families; the graves of your family.)

Outside of the media finally watching us for the last six months, the camps have been there before that. I know someone who was there on April 1, 2016. That’s well before the media started paying attention in August. Well before. The camps have been self-sustaining. Yes, there have been donations. Yes, donations were made in physical items, money for items, and money for legal funds. That money and those items went to keeping something beautiful alive.

People who were arrested had numbers written on their arms, they were kept in dog cages. Protectors who were peacefully in prayer had untrained dogs set on them to attack. There are photos floating around of one trainer who couldn’t keep her dog, who had blood in its mouth, under control. In sub-zero conditions in the early morning protectors were hosed down with freezing water - this includes the elderly and children. (Yes, there were children. Guess what, they were getting schooled there. Self sustaining.) Police shot bean bags, rubber bullets, and flash-bang bombs into the crowds. A woman had her arm blown to pieces because of this. 

At every point since the beginning, there has only been peace on our end. No rioting, no fire, no weapons, no alcohol, no drugs; nothing but peace. And from the end of law enforcement has been violence. Even residents had been violent, and police did nothing to them. But they sure as hell arrested people from camp for praying - a nonviolent act.

If you are not Native, you don’t get to dictate what happens on our lands. I don’t give a damn if the government does. The government is breaking a treaty right now, ignoring tribal sovereignty. Just because they do it, does not mean you get to. I don’t care how tired you are of hearing about it. We’re tired of having our lands stolen and having our rights violated. 

I keep seeing tweets like “okay so america is a dystopian novel now wheres the 16 year old girl to save us” and other condescending shit like that and i just….

where are the girls who are saving us you ask?

oh i don’t know, they are at the Oceti Sakowin camp fighting for the right to clean water and treaty rights. They are protecting their land and water against heavily militarized police forces.

They are and have been at many Black Lives Matter protests. Girls have fought against police brutality in black communities. Women, in fact, are among the top leaders of that movement.

They are the muslim girls who continue to fearlessly wear their hijabs in public despite rampant islamophobia.

And there were plenty of teenage girls at the women’s marches across the country. 

So while a single Katniss Everdeen figure has yet to emerge, that doesn’t mean she doesn’t exist. Because young women are protesting every day. They are the Katnisses and the Laia of Serras and the Aelins and the Mare Barrows and the Nehemia Ytgers and the Lihn Cinders that you’ve all read about. These girls exist. 

Realize that the fallacy of most dystopians, and many books, is that they often presents a single cohesive narrative of revolt and change. And in our huge, wide world, that is not how change works. But the books themselves are not incorrect in assuming that young women will be the arbiters of change. They are spot fucking on. 

petrichordiak  asked:

can i hear more about the class you hijacked? (this doesnt have to be private)

I actually got out of bed just so I could go full rant about this on my  computer, so y’all buckle up (thank you for giving me this opportunity lololol)

Okay, so this happened about a year, maybe a year and a half ago. I’m gonna go ahead and make this one public for the benefit of those that didn’t follow me back then, if that’s cool.

Let me preface this by saying that I had taken literally every one of the professor’s classes before then. Partly because they were the only anthropology style class the uni offered, and partly because halfway through the second class I realized that literally everything was the same, except the books, which we never used. Even the assignments were the same, and I had perfected a system of how to do those quickly, easily, and last-minute, lol. So it was pretty much the definition of an easy A, and the prof liked me bc I was nice, actually listened to her even though I’d heard it all before, and didn’t rat her ass out for not actually teaching what she was supposed to, lol.

I should’ve known right there.

So when there was an opportunity to take a Native Americans in North America class with her, I jumped on it. I needed the hours, I obviously knew a lot on the subject already, and it would be another easy a, if history was anything to go by. 

It became one of the most frustrating classes I have ever taken.

As always, the class started the same as the others. We started out learning about vocab and models. NBD, we’d get to specifics eventually, right?

Now there are about 16 to 18 weeks in your average semester.

By week 6 we had yet to learn anything about Native history. She’d assigned some reading about the moundbuilder’s archeological sites, but nothing about the modern day. Maybe she was just taking it slow, I thought, though I was bothered by her only talking about Natives in the past tense. But she’d told me in the first class I’d taken with her (years ago by now) that she was enrolled Native, so I didn’t call it out immediately. 

We get to week 8, halfway through the semester, she hadn’t covered anything. No mention of treaties, modern movements for civil rights, AIM (American Indian Movement), the illegal overthrow of Hawai’i, buffalo kill offs, smallpox blankets, Chicago museum’s bullshit, NAGPRA (a law protecting grave sites and demanding the return of remains to their Nation by museums and sites, if the Nation will accept them (sometimes they allow the remains to be housed by the museum bc they’re typically more secure there, but that’s very rare)) beyond how it affected archeologists, the different regions, the language families, ghost dance, the flooding of lands by companies illegally, human zoos, RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS, THE FUCKING TRAIL OF TEARS, NOTHING.

Like your 4th grade history segment, as racist as it probably was, probably was more informative than this bitch was being, okay? And I was getting mad. Y’all know me. Native activism is a huge part of my life, and has been for years. Students were being allowed to say really racist shit unchecked. The prof wasn’t teaching jack. Misinformation was being spread, even by the prof.

It felt like even in a class dedicated to us, we didn’t matter. Our history didn’t matter. 

I was fed up.

Then, she pissed me the absolute fuck off. She proceeded to spend the rest of the class talking about South America.

Now, our Indigenous family below the equator absolutely deserve to be discussed. They have so many issues that really, really need to be boosted and respected. We do not raise their voices often enough. But this was a class specifically about North America, and her reasoning for making it otherwise was racist in so many ways.

First, she changed the curriculum outside of its scope because she was “MORE INTERESTED IN SOUTH AMERICA, AND WOULD HAVE TO DO RESEARCH TO TALK ABOUT” the issues I was publicly demanding to know when she would cover. As if her personal interest and ignorance were more important than our lives. 

(side note, it turns out she was lying about being enrolled and Native. Her white supremacist brother (not even kidding) had said that a Cherokee woman chief in Minnesota or some shit had enrolled them. I asked her if she meant Wilma Mankiller, the first modern female Cherokee chief. She said no, it was someone else, and in the late nineties, after Wilma would’ve no longer been Chief. I publicly called her out, and even another student jumped in to help, because there was no other woman Chief then, and there was no recognized Nation that far North. Her white supremacist brother had lied bc he felt othered while working near the Din’e on a job site, bc they didn’t include his racist ass, lol. So she’d lied her way into being allowed to teach a class she didn’t even know or care about. So at this point, I was fucking done with her, lol)

She also was showing us old propaganda films, and literally every group she discussed was being painted as ignorant, warlike savages by her and the materials. She even defended a man that intentionally exposed Indigenous peoples with no immunity to certain diseases to said diseases ‘just to see what would happen.’ She recommended his books, including ‘Noble Savages’ to us. I shouldn’t have to explain why that’s racist, lmao.

All of this is to say that I was VERY fed up, she (and the class) was VERY racist, and she was going down.

Then her foolish self decided to assign a massive project where we were supposed to ‘teach the class’ about a Native subject (y i k e s, esp. since the class was full of non-Natives). Since I was Fed Up, I decided to skip the usual schooling on cultural appropriation to instead teach everyone (including her) about just a smattering of the important things she hadn’t even mentioned in passing. :)

What followed was a 33 page powerpoint.

Apologies for any inaccuracies, and blanket tw for slurs, racism, death, csa, torture, child abuse, etc etc etc

(I added all the regalia pics bc they made me happy and calmed me down, which I was gonna need. I set the presentation up as “Man, I sure had trouble deciding what to make my presentation about. Should I talk about X? Y? Z? This? That? This? And so on until I reached residential schools and Reconciliation as my discussion topic.)

I hope those gifs work. If not, they should be under my “Oka Crisis” tag, or “n i fn a history” and “n i fn a protests” tags. I also had decided early to use the Nations actual names where possible.

Oh look, a quick and easy way to make people realize THIS IS WHY YOU DON’T FUCKING REFER TO US AS SLURS, and here’s how to discuss the issue without being additionally harmful.

OH LOOK, SOURCES

#FreeLeonardPeltier

Getting progressively angrier at this point. The class is smart enough to stay silent.

#MMIW #NoMoreStolenSisters. Please bring them home. Whatever it takes.

Stayed on this slide juuust long enough to stare each person in class down.

Oh look, we’re finally hitting my actual topic. Again, shit’s about to get very heavy. Please read only if you can. I will not be glancing over these to check them rn, bc I can’t. I’m sharing just for y’all to see, and hopefully reblog to educate people.

I honestly wept as I worked on this part. I can’t read it again.

Calling it out.

AYUP. Canadians are so nice and their government isn’t problematic at all

There are survivors that are my age, and younger.

Not letting them forget that this isn’t just in the past. It still wounds us.

It still hurts. We’re still recovering.

I included resources for them, including the prof, to actually educate themselves, since our school sure as shit wasn’t going to do it.

A handful of my sources.

Anyways. I was done. So fucking done. She (the prof) still tried to guide the class back and pretend that it was acceptable that she hadn’t taught them anything. I didn’t let her. I reminded them all that the only reason that this was Canada focused was bc they’d just had the Truth and Reconciliation reports, whereas the US government hasn’t put any effort into assembling data on their atrocities. Go figure.

Anyways, happy #Canada150 everybody :)

OK to reblog.

4

On Thursday morning, law enforcement entered the Oceti Sakowin camp to do a final sweep before officially shutting it down, ending a months-long protest against the completion of the nearby Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Oceti Sakowin camp was the largest of several temporary camps on the northern edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. Protesters have been living on this land for months, in support of members of the Standing Rock Sioux.

Supporters have said that running the pipeline under under a part of the Missouri River known as Lake Oahe would jeopardize the primary water source for the reservation, and construction would damage sacred sites, violating tribal treaty rights. The river crossing is the last major piece of the pipeline that remains unfinished.

PHOTOS: The Final Hours Of A Dakota Access Pipeline Protest Camp

Photos: Angus Mordant for NPR

I don’t think Canada or the U.S. governments have changed at all — we have been stuck in this same battle since Wounded Knee, Oka, Elsipogtog and Standing Rock. When it comes to Indigenous rights — whether treaty rights or constitutional rights — they are rights in theory only. Our ‘rights’ are only legal arguments we get to make in court if we survive the on the ground attack and if we have enough money to fight the government in court for 25 years. They are certainly not 'rights’ if the government can use all force necessary to stop us from peacefully protecting those rights.“

Pam Palmater, Mi'kmaq, Mi'kma'ki, N.B.

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Pleasing to the ears: Edward Hardwicke reading “The Naval Treaty”. :) He also reads “The Adventure of the Crooked Man” and “The Greek Interpreter”! How I love his voice and (like everything with these two) wish there were more recordings!

Gilan: Fine. But if he kills us all, I’m going to get Will’s ghost to teach my ghost how to play the lute just so that I can annoy the hell out of your ghost.

Horace: I’ll just hire Halt’s ghost to kick your ghost’s ass.

Halt: My ghost wouldn’t associate with your ghost.


Bonus:

Will: It’s a mandola not a lute. A mandola…

NO SPIRITUAL SURRENDER

There was a reported 8-10 arrests yesterday at Oceti. What mainstream media failed to recognize is that a vast majority if not ALL of those arrested were independent & grassroots media taking a stand for the camp, and refusing to allow corporation controlled law enforcement to seize the camp with no documentation. Exercising the 1st amendment, and defending the liberties of this country, this is now a war of information as well as a spiritual war.

There is still independent media embedded inside the camp, and they will continue to defend the right to document for treaty rights and the rights of our Native American brothers and sisters.

WE ARE THE MEDIA NOW.

-Redhawk

calliopexclio  asked:

Hi, I'm writing a story that has a Native (Cherokee) mc. In my story, 70 years into the future, America is trying to rebuild itself after losing WW3, and isn't the safest place to live. My mc' s parents want her to be successful and able to leave America, so they send her to a boarding school in London, where she studies engineering in hopes of getting a job and enough money to get her parents out of America. I wanted to know how to avoid making the school seem like an assimilation school?

Sending a Cherokee Protagonist Away to School and Possible Assimilation Issues

I’m going to tell you something you probably don’t want to hear: there is no way to avoid making this look like an assimilation school, because the plot is built on assimilation and places assimilation as not only necessary, but preferable.

Indigenous groups from around the world have, indeed, sent their children to Western schools because their home was in danger. Many anthropological interpreters, who have lent the best data because they lived in two worlds, are such children. Many negotiators for treaty rights, stopping further colonialism, and teachers are more such children. Every example I could name— and sadly names other than Princess Ka'iulani and Francis La Flesche are escaping me— have the children return to the nation so they can try and negotiate with colonizers, and/or work with anthropologists to preserve culture. They are viewed as a necessary sacrifice in order to survive long term.

Children are so, so, so prized in Indigenous cultures. They are our future, and our societies have fallen apart because our children have been taken away. We try to keep our children close (unless trauma over generations of forced assimilation makes us think it’s for the best our children assimilate, but that is a plot non-Natives should not touch), so sending a child so far away, where there is no hope of them being able to continue their culture, is a level of hopelessness I cannot articulate. Having the goal be to take the parents away is even worse. When everything we do is to protect our ancestral lands, throwing that away is inconceivable to an Indigenous person.

And there lies the crux of why this story has an inescapable assimilation plot. When Indigenous groups send their children away, they do so in order for the children to come back partially assimilated and help protect their home. Natives do not have the concept of giving up their ancestral lands willingly. Every single resistance movement since colonization began has been built on the exact opposite, which is to stay on our homelands as long as humanly possible. Despite everything colonizers have tried to do to have us leave, we refuse to.

You cannot escape the assimilation plot you have, should you choose to go on this course. Read the story of Queen Liliʻuokalani and Princess Ka'iulani. Read the story of Francis La Flesche. Read them as told by their people. Those stories are the narratives for why we send our children away. It is not to help our parents escape. It is to help our lands remain as ours.

~ Mod Lesya

I love Padmé Amidala. She’s brave, passionate, and compassionate. She’s an amazing public speaker and a crack shot who’s not afraid to put her life on the line for her ideals. She’s a literal queen who ended a centuries-old conflict between her people and the Gungans, saved her planet, and looked amazing doing it. It would be pretty easy to imagine she’s perfect, especially in comparison to her human disaster of a husband. She isn’t though and her flaws are an essential piece of her character.  They are what make her so compelling and so relatable.  So, what are they?

  • Privilege. Padmé comes from a place of incredible privilege, especially in contrast to characters like Anakin. She grew up on a prosperous Mid Rim world in a wealthy, if not aristocratic, family which owned at least two homes, one of which was a huge lake-side villa. As queen and later senator, she has power to effect the fates of billions (and more), as well as servants, bodyguards, fabulous clothes, and a private ship. This woman has benefited mightily from the GFFA’s political and economic system. In TPM she is frustrated by system’s inability to address her needs in a timely manner, but she never feels victimized or betrayed by it.  Padmé sympathizes with the plight of the oppressed, but she never really takes the time to question the structures which cause their suffering or her role within those systems. 
  • Hubris. Padmé freed her planet from invaders at age 14 and saw herself as a savior from that point on. Throughout the films and the Clone Wars series, she puts herself in danger convinced that only she (and occasionally her friends) can save that person, negotiate that treaty, right that wrong.  Sometimes she’s right and it works, but just as often someone ends up dead.
  • Rose Colored Glasses. Padmé tries so hard to see the best in everyone she often overlooks things that are actually problems.  Anakin and Palpitine are the most obvious examples, but there are several more from the Clone Wars series. She also does this with the Republic as a whole, right up until it all goes to hell.
nytimes.com
Canada Legal Fight May ‘Destroy the Faith’ in First Nations Treaties
At stake in a case before the country’s Supreme Court: how much influence Canada’s indigenous groups will have over land and natural resources in their traditional territories.
By Dan Levin

OVER THE HART RIVER, Yukon Territory — The indigenous groups thought they had reached a deal: A vast landscape in the north of Yukon Territory would be mostly set aside for preservation, with only a small percentage allotted to industrial development.

But then the Yukon government decided to push aside this recommendation agreed to by a joint government-indigenous commission.

Instead, it favored far more development in the wilderness, which has huge deposits of coal, gas and minerals, including 18 billion tons of iron ore claimed by Chevron, the American petroleum giant.

Now the 26,000 square miles of the Peel Watershed — an area larger than the state of West Virginia where mountain sheep graze on the sides of snow-capped peaks, and grizzlies and wolves hunt caribou and moose along the banks of six pristine rivers — is at the heart of a legal battle before Canada’s Supreme Court.

Continue Reading.

abcnews.go.com
Trump administration withdrew memo that found 'ample legal justification' to halt Dakota Access pipeline
The legal opinion was withdrawn two days before an easement was approved.
By ABC News

Two days before the Trump administration approved an easement for the Dakota Access pipeline to cross a reservoir near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation, the U.S. Department of the Interior withdrew a legal opinion that concluded there was “ample legal justification” to deny it.

The withdrawal of the opinion was revealed in court documents filed this week by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the same agency that requested the review late last year.

“A pattern is emerging with [the Trump] administration,” said Jan Hasselman, an attorney representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “They take good, thoughtful work and then just throw it in the trash and do whatever they want to do.”

The 35-page legal analysis of the pipeline’s potential environmental risks and its impact on treaty rights of the Standing Rock Sioux and other indigenous tribes was authored in December by then-Interior Department Solicitor Hilary C. Tompkins, an Obama appointee who was – at the time – the top lawyer in the department.

“The government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Tribes calls for enhanced engagement and sensitivity to the Tribes’ concerns,” Tompkins wrote. “The Corps is accordingly justified should it choose to deny the proposed easement.”

Tompkins’ opinion was dated Dec. 4, the same day the Obama administration announced that it was denying an easement for the controversial crossing and initiating an environmental impact statement that would explore alternative routes for the pipeline. Tompkins did not respond to a request by ABC News to discuss her analysis or the decision made to withdraw it.

On his second weekday in office, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum that directed the Army Corps of Engineers to “review and approve” the pipeline in an expedited manner, to “the extent permitted by law, and as warranted, and with such conditions as are necessary or appropriate.” “I believe that construction and operation of lawfully permitted pipeline infrastructure serve the national interest,” Trump wrote in the memo.

Two weeks later, the Corps issued the easement to Dakota Access and the environmental review was canceled.

The company behind the pipeline project now estimates that oil could be flowing in the pipeline as early as March 6.

The analysis by Tompkins includes a detailed review of the tribes’ hunting, fishing and water rights to Lake Oahe, the federally controlled reservoir where the final stretch of the pipeline is currently being installed, and concludes that the Corps “must consider the possible impacts” of the pipeline on those reserved rights.

“The Tompkins memo is potentially dispositive in the legal case,” Hasselman said. “It shows that the Army Corps [under the Obama administration] made the right decision by putting the brakes on this project until the Tribe’s treaty rights, and the risk of oil spills, was fully evaluated.”

Tompkins’ opinion was particularly critical of the Corps’ decision to reject another potential route for the pipeline that would have placed it just north of Bismarck, North Dakota, in part because of the pipeline’s proximity to municipal water supply wells.

“The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservations are the permanent and irreplaceable homelands for the Tribes,” Tompkins wrote. “Their core identity and livelihood depend upon their relationship to the land and environment – unlike a resident of Bismarck, who could simply relocate if the [Dakota Access] pipeline fouled the municipal water supply, Tribal members do not have the luxury of moving away from an environmental disaster without also leaving their ancestral territory.”

Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the project, has said that “concerns about the pipeline’s impact on local water supply are unfounded” and “multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route.”

The decision to temporarily suspend Tompkins’ legal opinion two days before the easement was approved was outlined in a Feb. 6 internal memorandum issued by K. Jack Haugrud, the acting secretary of the Department of the Interior. A spokeswoman for the department told ABC News today that the opinion was suspended so that it could be reviewed by the department.

The Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes are continuing their legal challenges to the pipeline. A motion for a preliminary injunction will be heard on Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

The Corps has maintained, throughout the litigation, that it made a good faith effort to meaningfully consult with the tribes.

The tribes contend, however, that the Trump administration’s cancellation of the environmental review and its reversal of prior agency decisions are “baldly illegal.”

“Agencies can’t simply disregard their own findings, and ‘withdrawing’ the Tompkins memo doesn’t change that,” Hasselman said. “We have challenged the legality of the Trump administration reversal and we think we have a strong case.”

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ViewPoint | Trudeau’s Indigenous betrayal

OPINION: Pam Palmater says Justin Trudeau forgot his promises to First Nations after he was elected prime minister

Fight to Save Tribal Libraries


On March 16, 2017, President Donald Trump released his Budget Blueprint for 2018, also known as the “America First” budget. This proposed budget eliminates funding for IMLS, a federal agency that provides critical support for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian libraries across the country.

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) is calling on all tribal librarians, archivists, community members, and the public to share stories to help us fight for continued federal funding for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). We are seeking short stories from your communities to demonstrate the role tribal libraries play in supporting culture, community, and education. Use this form to share your story and upload any photos to accompany your story.

Funding for Native American libraries and information services has been a long struggle for those committed to the development of libraries in Indian Country since the 1970s. Strong and consistent advocacy from American Indian leaders helped to secure federal funding that would be used by tribes, for tribes, to meet their library and information needs. Vine Deloria, Jr. and other American Indian leaders have reminded us that the federal support of tribal library services is a function of Indian treaty rights as tribes sacrificed land and resources in exchange for educational services.

Our communities stand to lose millions in federal support for childhood literacy, language revitalization, digital infrastructure, college and vocational prep, job-seeking support, and so much more. In some cases, IMLS provides the only consistent source of library funding.

In a very real way, the defunding of IMLS could mean the loss of tribal libraries.