travertine terrace

“Badab-e Surt (Persian: باداب سورت‎) is a natural site in the Mazandaran Province of northern Iran, 95 km (59 mi.) south of the city of Sari and 7 km (4.3 mi.) west of Orost village. It comprises a range of stepped travertine terrace formations that have been created over thousands of years as flowing water from two mineral hot springs cooled and deposited carbonate minerals on the mountainside.” – Fereydoon Gharaei, 2015

Badab Soort (Persian: باداب سورت‎‎) is a natural site in Mazandaran Province in northern Iran, 95 kilometres (59 mi) south of the city of Sari, and 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) west of Orost village. It comprises a range of stepped travertine terrace formations that has been created over thousands of years as flowing water from two mineral hot springs cooled and deposited carbonate minerals on the mountainside.
Invitation to iran

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Kuang Si waterfalls, Laos

Pamukkale, Turkey.

I’m back! I’m going through 772 photos and started post-processing! First one of wonderful Pamukkale.

Enjoy!

M.

Photo taken by @stevemccurryofficial // I photographed these travertine terraces when the sun was setting at Pamukkale (literally Cotton Palace) in Turkey. The area has almost two dozen hot springs, and has been used for millennia.
It is recognized as a World Heritage Site, which has made the protection of the surreal limestone formations a high priority. by natgeo

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Kuang Si waterfalls, Laos

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7 travertine terrace waterfalls on the Krka river, Krka National Park, Croatia

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Slow Motion Video of the multi tier Quang Si waterfall in Laos - sure looks to be flowing over precipitated travertine terraces (the waterfall would grow these terraces on its own by precipitating calcite minerals)

A Roman temple, being mineralised

The lovely terraces of Travertine marble of Pamukkale (The Cotton Castle_) in Turkey (see http://on.fb.me/1JtO6rW and http://on.fb.me/1RrL88x for some great photos) are precipitated from hot springs of richly mineralised waters that rise through the complex faults riddling this tectonically active zone where Africa grinds into Eurasia. As the waters cool, they can no longer hold so much calcium and carbon in solution, and crystals of calcite start to form. They emerge at a balmy 35-38 Celsius, perfect for a nice soak on a cool day.

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Pamukkale, meaning “cotton castle” in Turkish, is a natural site in Denizli Province in the Inner Aegean region, located in the River Menderes valley of southwestern Turkey. The city contains hot springs and travertines, terraces of carbonate minerals left by the flowing water.                                                                                                                                                

14 Most Beautiful Water Bodies on Earth

Composed of 70% water, Earth is home to some of the most stunning bodies of water. From a rainbow colored pool to a surreal salt lake, which reflects the sky, we have rounded up the most beautiful and interesting sceneries in the world. 

Spotted Lake, British Columbia, Canada (Credit: All Canada Photos / Alamy)

Rich in minerals, mainly sulphates, this alkaline lake has small substances of silver and titanium. The circular fragments usually appear during summer as the water evaporates.


Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park (Credit: Frank Kovalchek, CC by 2.0)

As, the largest hot spring in Yellowstone National Park in the USA, this hot spring is composed of different colors. It is a mineral-rich body of water, displaying hues of red and green, which are the result of heat-loving pigmented bacteria.


Lake Retba, Senegal (Credit: Jeff Attaway, CC by 2.0)

With high dose of salt, Lake Retba makes it easy for people to float on its water. Its pink color comes from a salt-addiciting micro algae called Dunaliella salina, which produces the red hue.


Blood Falls in east Antarctica (Credit: Mike Martoccia, CC by 2.0)

A lake formed from a 2 million-year-old glacier, Blood Falls gets its vibrant red color from the iron-rich water, which flows out causing the iron to react with the oxygen to produce rust.


Caño Cristales, Colombia (Credit: Tom Till / Alamy)

From September to November this crystal clear river changes to a rainbow colored beauty. When the Marcarenia clavgera blooms, a native plant, it causes the water to change to shades of blue, red, green and orange.

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