travel in the tardis

Since Bill has been announced as the first openly gay Doctor Who companion…. 

- Bill who flirts with all sorts of 19th century women until the doctor has to pull her away because planet to save Bill, come on!

- Bill who almost accidentally destroyed the hierarchy of an alien monarchy by giving the cute princess a flower (a violent declaration of war on their planet)

- Bill who makes amazing food for anyone and everyone

- Bill who sits people down and gives the best, and bluntest, advice when they’re having girl trouble

- Bill who heard that all of these women fell in love with the doctor and just started fucking laughing

- She was in hysterics for the next ten minutes 

- She still finds it hilarious, even now 

- Because all these pretty women

- And him?

I can’t wait for The Doctor to travel back into the past and have some crusty old man be like, “Women can’t be doctors, that’s blasphemy!” as she proceeds to psychic paper the shit out of them and they stumble over their words awkwardly trying to apologize for disrespecting someone with such high authority.

10 ways in which fans rewrite their favourite television shows:

1) Recontextualization - the production of vignettes, short stories, and novels that seek to fill in the gaps in broadcast narratives and suggest additional explanations for particular actions.

2) Expanding the series timeline - the production of vignettes, short stories, novels that provide background history of characters, etc., not explored in broadcast narratives or suggestions for future developments beyond the period covered by the broadcast narrative.

3) Refocalization - this occurs when fan writers move the focus of attention from the main protagonists to secondary figures. For example, female or black characters are taken from the margins of a text and given centre stage.

4) Moral realignment - a version of refocalization in which the moral order of the broadcast narrative is inverted (the villains become the good guys). In some versions the moral order remains the same but the story is now told from the point of view of the villains.

5) Genre shifting - characters from broadcast science fiction narratives, say, are relocated in the realms of romance or the Western, for example.

6) Cross-Overs - characters from one television programme are introduced into another. For example, characters from Doctor Who may appear in the same narrative as characters from Star Wars.

7) Character dislocation - characters are relocated in new narrative situations, with new names and new identities. 

8) Personalization - the inserted of the writer into a version of their favourite television programme. For example, I could write a short story in which I am recruited by the Doctor to travel with him in the TARDIS on a mission to explore what has become of the Manchester United in the twenty-fourth century. (However, as Jenkins points out, many in the fan culture discourage this subgenre of fan writing.)

9) Emotional intensification - the production of what are called “hurt-comfort” stories in which favourite characters, for example, experience emotional crisis.

10) Eroticization - stories that explore the erotic side of a character’s life. Perhaps the best known of this subgenre of fan writing is “slash” fiction, so called because it depicts same-sex relationships (as in Kirk/Spock,etc.)

- Henry Jenkins Textual Poachers pg 162-177