transparent-lighters

Dries Van Noten spring—summer 1996.

It is unusual for a designer to be famed for his men’s and women’s collections alike, but Dries Van Noten is just that. His designs take all types of men and women into account. Be they tall or short, plump or slender, they will find something to their liking in his designs. He succeeds in making suits for men who don’t want to wear suits, and dresses for women who don’t like wearing dresses. He seduces them with his choice of fabrics and his tailoring. Fabrics and colours are very important for Dries Van Noten, who grew up in the world of textiles — at the age of sixteen he was already purchasing fabrics for his father’s clothing store. His fabrics are usually dyed and prewashed specially for him. He uses natural materials like silk and wool; he prefers fabric that doesn’t look too new; it should feel soft and look as if it has already been worn, as if the garments has been ‘broken in’. He experiments with textiles: obvious materials are replaced by something more transparent, heavier or lighter. Subtlety lies in the way the fabrics are used, one layer superimposed on another, and the combination of different materials.

A garment’s use may also be switched around: a jacket used as a shirt, and vice versa. The structure of the clothes is rarely emphasized and is subordinate to comfort and elegance. Dries Van Noten excels in the art of marrying opposites — simple with sophisticated, classical with inventive — whilst still ensuring the reputation of certain traditions. He tends to see himself as a tailor. 

Dries Van Noten: An accessory gives a garment tone and can even add uses. Just think of a dress with or without a belt; the belt, for instance, enables you to turn it into a coat. In addition, accessories define clothing — think of one and the same dress, either with walking shoes or with high heels. 

jane-sama  asked:

Hey! Your art is just amazing and it inspires me so much, but what stands out to me the most is the hair. Do you have any tips for painting it?

edit: link to dA vers!

—-

ah thanks! i always liked the way i did hair too tbh heh;; i was asked to make a tutorial eariler this year but i never found the time to do it but i guess ill do it here OTL

1) sketch! 

as you may know early in the morning, hair is very flimsy and uncooperative! even straight hair isnt going to be perfectly straight. there will be loose ends and parts that stick out. hair is not one block!

2) painting! for the way i paint you might want to see my colouring walkthrough coz i wont explain in detail about it.

fringes and hair that is against the face would tend to be more transparent/lighter than the thickness of the hair in over places of the scalp.

3) shade!

colours are all on the same layer to allow for colours to blend over smoothly. for certain parts of the hair such as a the fringe/block areas i liked to use this brush

it gives a nice streaky texture. dont use too much/only this brush though! then it looks tacky :T. you want different widths in colour/lines.

4) overlay colour to brighten and darken! refer to the other tutorial!

5) merge and paint!

i added the glow coz it would have related to the colour of her eyes

the ends of the hair are more streaky and loose while the roots can bee more blocky and less detailed

theres a bit of blue glow that appears on my fringe  from her eyes which i sometimes like to add. this is obviously a stylistic choice coz aint no eyes that glowy enough for that to happen LOL

streaky, flimsy, loose hair makes things look more realistic. you dont want things that are ugly like this

…which happens to be my first attempt at painting LOL

you dont always have to do a lot of hair details though. esp if say… the face isnt the main subject in the painting. short hair can tend to bypass all that flimsiness i suppose??? @@

flimsy long hairrrr. when theres more hair its less easy to sidestep it looking weird if its one big chuck e__e

in the end everything still depends on your own personal style though!! if your style gives things a lot of detail, everything tends to have to follow through or itll look awkward.

6) finISH HIM IT

woot! i hope that was vaguely helpful!!!

Dries Van Noten spring—summer 1999.

It is unusual for a designer to be famed for his men’s and women’s collections alike, but Dries Van Noten is just that. His designs take all types of men and women into account. Be they tall or short, plump or slender, they will find something to their liking in his designs. He succeeds in making suits for men who don’t want to wear suits, and dresses for women who don’t like wearing dresses. He seduces them with his choice of fabrics and his tailoring. Fabrics and colours are very important for Dries Van Noten, who grew up in the world of textiles — at the age of sixteen he was already purchasing fabrics for his father’s clothing store. His fabrics are usually dyed and prewashed specially for him. He uses natural materials like silk and wool; he prefers fabric that doesn’t look too new; it should feel soft and look as if it has already been worn, as if the garments has been ‘broken in’. He experiments with textiles: obvious materials are replaced by something more transparent, heavier or lighter. Subtlety lies in the way the fabrics are used, one layer superimposed on another, and the combination of different materials.

A garment’s use may also be switched around: a jacket used as a shirt, and vice versa. The structure of the clothes is rarely emphasized and is subordinate to comfort and elegance. Dries Van Noten excels in the art of marrying opposites — simple with sophisticated, classical with inventive — whilst still ensuring the reputation of certain traditions. He tends to see himself as a tailor. 

Ernesto Bautista | El Salvador

Masas [Masses] | 2009 | Transparent lighter filled with blood

“El gesto de un encendedor común y corriente lleno de sangre está cargado de múltiples significados. La sangre hace alusiones a la vida, la violencia, la historia familiar y la pasión. Al mostrar el encendedor al espectador, Bautista induce a la posibilidad de su activación añadiendo la posibilidad del fuego. El resultado es todo lo relacionado con la sangre humana quemada, o alternativamente, el líquido rojo podría no ser inflamable, eliminando la posibilidad de su propia destrucción para auto preservarse.”-Ernesto Bautista

Dries Van Noten spring—summer 1999.

It is unusual for a designer to be famed for his men’s and women’s collections alike, but Dries Van Noten is just that. His designs take all types of men and women into account. Be they tall or short, plump or slender, they will find something to their liking in his designs. He succeeds in making suits for men who don’t want to wear suits, and dresses for women who don’t like wearing dresses. He seduces them with his choice of fabrics and his tailoring. Fabrics and colours are very important for Dries Van Noten, who grew up in the world of textiles — at the age of sixteen he was already purchasing fabrics for his father’s clothing store. His fabrics are usually dyed and prewashed specially for him. He uses natural materials like silk and wool; he prefers fabric that doesn’t look too new; it should feel soft and look as if it has already been worn, as if the garments has been ‘broken in’. He experiments with textiles: obvious materials are replaced by something more transparent, heavier or lighter. Subtlety lies in the way the fabrics are used, one layer superimposed on another, and the combination of different materials.

A garment’s use may also be switched around: a jacket used as a shirt, and vice versa. The structure of the clothes is rarely emphasized and is subordinate to comfort and elegance. Dries Van Noten excels in the art of marrying opposites — simple with sophisticated, classical with inventive — whilst still ensuring the reputation of certain traditions. He tends to see himself as a tailor. 

2

Now, I’m going to finish my little “trilogy” about Mustafar and The Duel, which has so long been a subject of speculation and anticipation.

Notice how these two images convey very different kind of emotions and moods? There is a quite powerful visual symbolism even before they start fighting.

One of them shows us Anakin’s back. This eye-angle shot is kept quite dark and gloomy, if he’d turns around he’d look directly into our eyes. The way it is, though, we don’t see the “monster’s” eyes, but there are those slightly creepy “blue eyes” in the background that only help to sell the dark mood of that particular shot.

Then there is the one with Obi-Wan. A low angle shot which makes Obi-Wan look almost … majestic. He is a noble knight, fighting for democracy. His outft is also considerably lighter, more transparent and - of course and despite the hellish world they’re both on - there is a strong bit of hope behind Obi-Wan: Suns have always been a sign for hope in Star Wars - ever since Luke was watching two of them on Tatooine, at least.

Yet and in spite of all the differences: Essentially, neither Anakin nor Obi-Wan is truly black or white. They both wear brown suits, just Anakin a very dark brown and Obi-Wan a very light brown.

They are more alike than they appear at first. They were brothers.

@glorianasims4 ;-;

Calling all testers! I need to make sure these appear as lovely in my game as they do yours. 

There are heavy transparency issues with the lighter colours, so please do not swear at me for this LOL. They look amazing in black and dark brown though.

If you’d like to test this for me and you are available to do so today, then drop me an ask and I will send it to you <33

(( A sort of step-by-step process of Al’s wings because they’re difficult to explain and do.  The first step after coloring it all in is to use a softer, mostly transparent brush with the lighter color to make a gradient in the center before going through on the first row of feathers, then going over it once again with white.  The part where the hand should be on an arm is darker and there are only two stripes on the middle row, then five if they can be fit on the primaries/secondaries.  The edge of the primaries get the darker gradient first and two “dot rows” of the lighter color, as well s some places getting touched up with that color.  All of the primaries, secondaries and coverts get a white stripe down them as like the barb of the feather. The outside of his wings are just a plain brown and they are overall darker than normal Ospreys ))

Dries Van Noten spring—summer 1996.

It is unusual for a designer to be famed for his men’s and women’s collections alike, but Dries Van Noten is just that. His designs take all types of men and women into account. Be they tall or short, plump or slender, they will find something to their liking in his designs. He succeeds in making suits for men who don’t want to wear suits, and dresses for women who don’t like wearing dresses. He seduces them with his choice of fabrics and his tailoring. Fabrics and colours are very important for Dries Van Noten, who grew up in the world of textiles — at the age of sixteen he was already purchasing fabrics for his father’s clothing store. His fabrics are usually dyed and prewashed specially for him. He uses natural materials like silk and wool; he prefers fabric that doesn’t look too new; it should feel soft and look as if it has already been worn, as if the garments has been ‘broken in’. He experiments with textiles: obvious materials are replaced by something more transparent, heavier or lighter. Subtlety lies in the way the fabrics are used, one layer superimposed on another, and the combination of different materials.

A garment’s use may also be switched around: a jacket used as a shirt, and vice versa. The structure of the clothes is rarely emphasized and is subordinate to comfort and elegance. Dries Van Noten excels in the art of marrying opposites — simple with sophisticated, classical with inventive — whilst still ensuring the reputation of certain traditions. He tends to see himself as a tailor. 

Spring/Summer 1996
In September 1995 Van Noten had the opportunity to present his menswear collection for the Summer of 1996 at Pitti Uomo, the menswear fashion fair in Florence. The whole event was more of an impression, a mood, rather than a real fashion parade at which the clothes are clearly seen. The show at the Piazzale Michelangelo ended in a stunning fireworks display and disco party, the main guest being the statue of David.