transit map

New Yorker Cover, March 5th, 2012 - “Second Ave Line” by Roz Chast

A classic New Yorker cover, showing the much-maligned Second Avenue Subway (still five years from completion of even Phase 1 at the time of publication) wending its way past a series of increasingly unlikely stations. Papua New Guinea, Saturn and the Yukon Territories are my favourites. 

TST is so goddamn blue: a meta

TST is just all kinds of weird. Everything feels off, and even the first third, which is supposed to be light-hearted and funny, is unsettling in many ways (for instance, why was John, a doctor, driving the car when his wife, Mary, was going into labor instead of having Sherlock drive? We know Sherlock can drive very well from THoBV, so wtf? And why would Sherlock ever say that Mary is better than John when it clearly hurt John that he’d say that? And what was the narrative point of the dog being there, apart from the fact that Sherlock likes dogs? Anyway, I digress.)

One theory that I’ve seen going around is that Sherlock is narrating this episode, and therefore, we’re dealing with an unreliable narrator. If Sherlock is in fact telling this story to his therapist, Ella, at the end of the episode, and is lying about some parts of his story, then what is he lying about? Well, one option is that he’s lying about how Mary died in order to protect someone. But he’s Sherlock… who would he bother protecting?

“It’s always you, John Watson.” Of course. It probably has to do with John. With saving and protecting John, as is Sherlock’s MO.

One theory by @the-7-percent-solution that I’m extremely fond of at the moment is that John killed Mary, and Sherlock is lying to his therapist in order to protect John (just like Watson may have lied in the original ACD story Charles Augustus Milverton to protect Holmes after Holmes presumably killed Milverton, which is what Mofftiss believe happened), and to give John an alias. Which would mean that quite a lot of the episode is either a fabrication, or changed slightly in order to make the story more convincing.

And, since I noticed that there is a LOT of blue in this episode, I decided to go through and examine the most blue-lit and blue-colored scenes, and see if I anything popped out at me. Something did. It might be nothing, but I’m gonna roll with it and see where it goes.

This is the scene where Sherlock discovers the A.G.R.A. memory stick in the Thatcher bust, and fights with Ajay. Everything in this scene is blue, or lit up with blue: the pool, the pool lights, the waves painted on the walls (real subtle with the Water Thing there, Mark), the police lights. It’s overwhelmingly blue. Which means that, if blue coloring or lighting means that Sherlock is lying (and I will explain why I think that might be the case in just a second) then Ajay’s story about why he’s actually hunting down Mary - or even the way/reason that Sherlock discovers the memory stick - might be either a lie, or a half-lie on Sherlock’s part (assuming he’s telling Ella all this after it’s happened.)

These screenshots are taken from the montage of Rosamund Mary’s escape trip. Again, there is quite a bit of blue, especially in the transitions and maps. And the dice. Again, just like the scene where Sherlock finds the A.G.R.A. memory stick, this part of the narrative has been twisted or is unreliable. We’re not seeing the full truth here. Maybe Rosamund Mary had a much more sinister reason to leave London than just escaping another assassin. (I’m not sure this part holds up as well as some of the other blue-colored scenes, but still. I thought it was very interesting how they stuck with this one-color scheme across so many scenes in this episode.)

This is the scene where Rosie begins crying, and John texts the girl from the bus stop. Again, everything in this scene is pretty damn blue; at least it stood out as being strangely blue to me. I mean, c’mon, even the bathroom tiling and towels are blue:

So maybe that means that this scene isn’t entirely true, either. The unreliable narrator - Sherlock, possibly - has embellished or left out something critical to understanding (in context) this scene. I’m not entirely sure what to make of this one, but maybe someone can help me out with figuring out how/why this scene might possibly have been a lie or a half-lie.

So I think this one is pretty self-explanatory. This whole scene is so strange and off, as many people who are much better at this whole meta thing than I am have already pointed out (I.E., John, an army doctor, not doing anything other than talk to his dying wife when he could clearly do so much more to help save her… jfc?)

Maybe Rosamund Mary didn’t really die in this sccene. Maybe, after finding out something about Mary’s past or present while confronting her about the A.G.R.A. memory stick or Morocco (again, assuming that both those scenes weren’t shown to the audience exactly how they happened) John killed her, and Sherlock’s protecting John by not telling the story how it really happened. Or maybe it’s something else… but there is an incredible amount of blue in this scene, which very clearly connects it (for me) to the previous scenes I’ve mentioned.

After Rosamund Mary’s death scene, the camera pans up and we get this shot:

A blue shark. And since sharks have repeatedly been associated with villains already on this show, that’s pretty damn suggestive. The shark is still swimming - it hasn’t stopped, and therefore it hasn’t died.

After the blue shark, we immediately get this shot a box (coffin? Ashes?) burning with blue flames:

Again, this is sticking to a common color scheme present in many other scenes that could easily have been changed or fabricated to hide a much more sinister side of Rosamund Mary, and a very different version of that aquarium scene. So maybe Rosamund Mary isn’t actually dead, or the how/why of her death is a lie, or, or, or…

And that brings me to why I think that blue might be important.  In one of the last scenes in the episode, we see that Sherlock is in therapy, and trying to figure out what to “do about John.”

Strangely, the therapist, Ella, has an office that’s painted blue: walls, ceiling, everything. (It is also shaped similarly to the tube in the aquarium, and lit in a very similar way to the room where Rosamund Mary died, but I’m not entirely sure that has any significance?) Oftentimes, when pressured to make something up or lie about something, people will look to what’s around them to help them come up with material for their lies. So if Sherlock is recounting this story from his memory, isn’t it possible that his surrounding are leaking into how he sees those memories, especially the ones that aren’t coming from his memory because they’re partially or fully falsehoods?

And then the episode ends on this shot:

More blue, with Sherlock framed in front of water, on his way to “save John Watson.” Real subtle, Mark.


((If anyone recognizes a reference to one of their metas in this post, please, please, please tell me and I’ll tag you and give credit! I really don’t want to seem like I’m stealing anyone’s theories, I just got excited by all the metas I was seeing and decided to make one, too!))

anonymous asked:

I really want to get into astrology and know about it as much as you do(you really inspire me) but I don't know where to start. and after the basics, where do I learn the more complex stuff? thanks

Aaaaaahh your kindness inspires me!!! And I’m so glad you’re so interested in astrology!

I am going to assume that by “the basics” you mean the definitions of the planets, signs, and houses, and probably also what a planet in a house means and a planet in a sign and so on. So I’ll assume that by “more complex stuff” you mean aspects and/or major aspect patterns, interceptions, duplications, asteroid stuff, progressions, transits, draconic charts, etc etc.

OK, so. I’ll be honest.
I learned mostly from Google.
In the early stages of my learning, I was looking to bloggers to answer my questions, but I couldn’t find anyone who knew a lot of the complex stuff and would give me the in-depth answers I wanted, to I just googled the cheese out of it. I’m talking clicking every article for 10+ pages on one topic.
Now, I admit one can learn an awful lot that way, but it is not exactly efficient, and I certainly want to give you more direction than I got.

So, here is a brief set of references that can help you learn astrology more efficiently than I did.

1. Astrology books. The internet has a lot of stuff on it, but I have never found more information than when I have paid for it. There are a lot of astrology books on amazon, but I honestly found the most books in a sort of hippie-shop in a city near me called the Dancing Moon. If you have a hippie-shop near you, definitely check it out. Also, used book stores sometimes have interesting collections of astro books.
A few books that I have and enjoy:

  • Astrology of the Moon by Amy Herring–talks about moon signs and houses as well as progressed moon signs and houses, really helped me out concerning progressions
  • Astrology, Karma, and Transformation by Stephen Arroyo–really in-depth look at the outer planets, karma and reincarnation in the birth chart
  • The Book of Pluto by Steven Forrest–REALLY in-depth look at Pluto

I don’t have many astrology books because books are expensive and astrology books are not easy for me to find, but I adore the books I do have, and they make it a lot easier for me to learn (as I get distracted easily on the computer)

2. Websites made for learning astrology. To be honest, I don’t use these much, so I don’t really know if they go as in-depth as I assume, but you may find them helpful.



3. Websites and articles. There are particular websites I return to frequently, because I find them so helpful. I bookmark a LOT of things, and I keep those bookmarks organized for easy reference.
Here are a few sites that help me:

  • http://astrofix.net/ –this is GREAT for studying aspects because it uses short phrases to explain how a planets energy works with another planets energy. There is also a series of posts on Nodes and rulers of houses in houses which is really great. Hover over the “Explore” button to navigate to these.
  • http://surrealspotlight.blogspot.com/search/label/astrology –this blog no longer updates, but it has a lot of really interesting posts discussing things well beyond planet in house/sign.
  • http://wordsforthepeople.com/site-map/ –Scroll down to “Articles” and “Blog” and you will see a list of complex and often spiritual astro topics, many of which regard transits.
  • http://wordsforthepeople.com/site-map/I like this one less, but it does have some interesting articles. More transit stuff, among other things.
  • http://www.llewellyn.com/journal/article_topic.php?article_topic=Astrology –These articles are short, but so specific and interesting, I love them.
  • https://skywriter.wordpress.com/ –another that talks a lot about transits (there are a lot of sites about these) but if you dig into her blog you can find some other stuff, too, specifically about how to calculate your dominant planet (without using astro.com) and a discussion of stelliums and alpha planets.
  • http://www.healwithastrology.com/blog/ –so this is a little more basic but it is great because it offers advice. Like, legitimate advice that I have found very helpful, not just “You’re an Aries (sun), so try to keep your cool” but very spiritual and meaningful advice. the links on the side labelled 2nd house, 12th house, moon signs, and sun through the houses are most relevant.
  • http://www.beliefnet.com/columnists/ohmystars/astrology/ –more interesting articles on astrology, some of which regard current events and transits. I originally found this because I was looking for more info on yods, and it gave a different perspective than most other sites (most sites say “yods are great, they speak of untold power!” and one blogger on this site write something along the lines of “yeah, yods can be great, but they are so awkward to work with because in order to make those aspects the planets have to be in signs that don’t work well together”
  • http://feeds.ezinearticles.com/category/Arts-and-Entertainment:Astrology.xml –this has a bit of numerology riddled in, but a decent amount of neat astro articles
  • http://pegasusastrology.com/articles –a few articles from a tumblr blogger I follow. I really enjoyed the draconic astrology one and the “Discovering the themes in your chart” one.
  • https://www.scribd.com/doc/31151867/2204105-Pluto-Sign-House-Aspect –ok so I linked you to a very specific and possibly “basic” article about Pluto here, but I love it so much I had to include it.  I honestly have no idea how to navigate the main site, Scribd, and sometimes when I click on stuff it says I have to be a member to view the whole document and sometimes it doesn’t, but this article and many of the “suggested” articles to the side and at the bottom are unrestricted and quite fun to read.
  • http://teachmeastrology.com/midpoint-calculator/#47 – this is a midpoint calculator. Midpoints are something I am only just getting into, so I can’t say much, but it tells you all your midpoints and has short descriptions of them. A good place to begin, I guess.
  • http://astromatrix.org/ –has descriptions of all the transit and natal aspects. Handy reference.
  • http://astro-charts.com/--handy for spotting major aspect patterns in a chart, as the computer does it for you. However, astro.com makes more accurate charts, and astro-charts isn’t perfect when it comes to spotting aspect patterns–for example, I have a stellium, five planets in a house, and it didn’t catch it. So this is helpful, but make sure to do some work yourself as well to be certain.


4. Bloggers and forums. There are lots of places where you can talk to other people about astrology. I have never used any forums myself, but I do read some forum posts for reference. I do talk to plenty of tumblr bloggers, though.


Here are a few blogs that usually go beyond planets in signs/houses–unfortunately I haven’t found many.


5. Google will always be your friend. As will I! Asking either of us questions is always a pretty decent way to find stuff out.

Aaaannd that wasn’t as brief as I thought it would be. Oh well. Probably a good thing.

I hope this helps!