transgender allies

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Similarities between Blake Brockington and Leelah Alcorn

1. They were both Transgender.

2, They were both rejected by their families. (Blake was in fostercare because his family kicked him out)

3.  Their ages. (Blake had just turned 18, and Leelah was 17 turning 18)

4. They both commited suicide.

So explain to me why this well known Transgender activist, Blake Brockington, who raised thousands for charity and became the first black transgender homecoming king is getting almost no media attention. Leelah Alcorn trended across Twitter and Tumblr—even got her own Wikipedia page and article in People magazine. 

This is by no means a comparison or a contest for opression. But Blake Brockington deserves the same memorial Leelah Alcorn was given— if not more.  Three thousand to three hundred and sixty four( and that is including articles about him winning @ HOCO) .The only clear difference between them is his race. Preserve this young man’s life.

REST IN POWER KING, BLAKE BROCKINGTON.

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NEW VIDEO: “Learning How To Be A Better Trans Ally- this one was so much fun! i hung out with my friend Janet Mock, & she graciously spent some time sharing some easy tips on how to be a better ally to the transgender community!! go give it some love & reblog to share with your followers.

Ally is not a word you can take, it is not something you stab your flag into and declare you have earned because you found it. Ally is a word given. A word that is not trustworthy if it only comes from your own mouth.

Ally is a passport; you may travel in these spaces but you must follow the law of the land. The word has no meaning if it has not been approved by the proper authorities. And the authorities are us.

We are citizens of this land and we continue to live here when you have gone home. You can read every travel guide, and know every intersection in our roads, but if you are not a citizen you are a visitor. 

Ally is not a ticket, a pass to sit down and enjoy the show. Activism is not a spectator sport, you are either playing or you are on the opposing team. If you want to enjoy the game you are going to have to shoulder some tackles for the players. Because we have bruises all over our bodies and you are wearing a suit of armor.  

Ally comes with a class. We are the teachers and you are the student. You will listen and will only participate when you are called upon. If you want to be an ally you have to first realize that your voice is not the most important one in the room. You are there to listen, and we will know if you didn’t do the reading. 

Ally is not a part of a gift bag you get for coming to the party. If you want the word you must come to the funerals as well as the parades.  

The word comes with work. It comes with struggle, inconvenience, and time. Ally is something you do. Not someone you are. It is a job, not a title. 

So thank you for your application. We will review it and get back to you in a couple of weeks. 

I found this moment quite symbolic as I stumbled across these two girls intertwined with each other, hiding underneath a Pride rainbow flag as they shared a private moment together. In a way it shows how they feel protected underneath the rainbow, free from prejudice and labelling. In another light it could show them hiding from the world underneath what they find safe, but either way I think this is my favourite photo from London Pride, 2015.

RePosting this as we enter Pride Month(s)

Pride is something I struggle with to some degree even having come out of the closet. There are days when it’s quite clear that unless I “present” as Trans NonBinary I will not be seen as such.

Some days nobody could stop me from “presenting,” other days it’s an honest chore, and there have been long stretches where I’m too busy disentangling myself from my own dysphoria to grasp what’s going on at all. So accept this friendly reminder:

You deserve to feel proud, year round, no matter what.

If you’re not ready to march - that’s fine.If you haven’t come out - that’s fine.If you’re too broke to go to events - that’s fine.If you’re just not feeling it - that’s fine too.

Regardless of the feelings that can complicate things, I’m happy you’re here. I take pride in simply knowing people like you. That’s enough. You’re enough! <3
What to do if someone comes out to you as trans:

- ask their preferred pronouns

- ask their preferred name

- ask when and where they would like to be referred to as their preferred name and pronouns

- ask if they need anything (this broad question allows them to tell you what they need rather then prompting them into a situation that might give them dysphoria)

- ask if they have support and if they’d like help getting in contact with anyone

- telling them that you still care about them and that them coming out does not change the relationship that you have with them

friendly reminder to parents that it is okay to learn new things from your child, especially if they identify within the LGBTQ+ community. because chances are, there are going to be things that they’ll know that you may not. it doesn’t make you stupid, it makes you an understanding and open-minded parent.

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How to Compliment Trans Women  

Stef Sanjati: “I hope this is informative - almost everyone will unknowingly give a backhanded compliment at some point, and it’s okay to make mistakes as long as you try to learn from them! Share some of your own experiences in the comments. Love you!”