tower-of-david

10

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)

Director - Peter Jackson, Cinematography - Andrew Lesnie

“It’s like in the great stories, Mr. Frodo, the ones that really mattered. Full of darkness and danger they were, and sometimes you didn’t want to know the end because how could the end be happy? How could the world go back to the way it was when so much bad had happened? But in the end, it’s only a passing thing, this shadow. Even darkness must pass. A new day will come, and when the sun shines, it’ll shine out the clearer. Those were the stories that stayed with you, that meant something even if you were too small to understand why. But I think Mr. Frodo, I do understand, I know now. Folk in those stories had lots of chances of turning back, only they didn’t. They kept going because they were holding on to something…. That there’s some good in the world, Mr. Frodo, and it’s worth fighting for.”

theguardian.com
Over 170 years after Engels, Britain is still a country that murders its poor | Aditya Chakrabortty
The victims of Grenfell Tower didn’t just die. Austerity, outsourcing and deregulation killed them – just as Victorian Manchester killed the poor then
By Aditya Chakrabortty

The 19th-century industrialists who resisted the factories acts would recognise a kindred spirit in Boris Johnson, who has claimed “health and safety fears are making Britain a safe place for extremely stupid people”. The next TV interviewer to face the foreign secretary should ask him either to repeat those words or apologise for them. But the deadliest rationale came from David Cameron, who as PM wrote off the legal protections given to workers and consumers as “an albatross around the neck of British businesses”. I cannot remember a more brazen recent statement of profits before people.”

8

8 June 1492 | The death of Dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville

From Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower by David Baldwin:

Elizabeth died at Bermondsey Abbey nearly two months after making her will, on Friday 8 June 1492. Her body was conveyed by boat to Windsor on Whit Sunday, 10 June… accompanied by Prior Ingilby, Dr Brent, Edward Haute, her second cousin, and two gentlewomen, one of them her husband’s illegitimate daughter, Grace. The wooden coffin was taken ‘prevely’ (privately or secretly) from the Thames to the Castle and was received there at eleven at night by a single priest and a clerk. There was no ringing of bells nor formal reception by the dean and canons of St George’s Chapel, and she seems to have been interred almost immediately without any form of ceremony. The Marquess of Dorset, his half-sisters Anne, Catherine and Bridget, Edmund de la Pole (the slain Earl of Lincoln’s brother) and other relatives reached Windsor on Tuesday, and that evening the Bishop of Rochester conducted the services of dirige and requiem mass. The Queen was prevented from attending by her impending confinement; but the King, and other senior peers and churchmen were all conspicuous by their absence, and one of the heralds present was shocked by the general modesty of the proceedings. His comment that ‘ther was nothyng doon solemply for her savyng a low herse suche as they use for the comyn people with iiij wooden candilstikks abowte hit’ and that there was ‘ther never a new torche, but old torches, nor poure man in blacke gowne nor hoods, but upon a dozeyn dyvers olde men holdyng old torches, and torches ends’ requires no elaboration, and it is unclear why the Dean of Windsor, who was present, played no part in the services himself. It is sometimes suggested that Elizabeth had requested a simple and inexpensive funeral out of a deep sense of piety and that was accordingly what she was given: but she would have been aware that a deceased’s estate normally bore these expenses, and that queenly obsequies were beyond her means. Elizabeth may have thought of piety in terms of poverty, although few great noblewomen would have chosen austerity or thought money and their faith incompatible. Margaret Beaufort, who was as pious as she was powerful, used her great wealth to found chantries and university colleges and to support numerous religious ‘good causes’, and when she died in June 1509 her total assets, in plate, jewels and rich materials still amounted to £14,724. Her elaborate funeral, which cost £1,021, was a far cry from Elizabeth’s impoverished burial when, it seems, Dorset paid the 40s in alms which was distributed after mass out of his own pocket. Requests for a modest funeral were a mark of humility, largely ignored by contemporaries who felt that the deceased should be buried in accordance with his or her rank in society, and it is difficult to believe that she who had once been Queen of England had insisted upon this dismal and unqueenly ending. Be that as it may, in the course of her life Elizabeth had mourned the deaths of all five of her brothers, all but one of her seven sisters, four of her five sons and two of her daughters, and she may have felt that there was little to detain her in this world when her own time came.

All for me/Peter Pan Smut

Originally posted by pan-imagines-ig

Most of these are taken from my Wattpad account! (Twtrash01)

Send me requests for the following Fandoms: Teenwolf, Vampire Diaries, Dolantwins, OUAT(Peter Pan, Robbie Kay, Supernatural, Suicide Squad, The 100. Basically I’ll write for any fandom. I’ll write non-smut as well. Be specific in what you want! *I DON’T OWN ANY GIFS*

Request:  Okay so what if Emma swan and rumple and everyone want leverage? So they take the reader, pans lost girl, and kidnap her. They bring her to storybrooke. Pan is in love with her and all of the lost boys are protective of her because she’s one of them. She is like the left side of Pan while Felix is his right hand you get what I mean? So anyways Pan and the lost boys decide they’re going to go to storybrooke. Since they’re creepy as fuck haha they’re going to do everything they can to get her back. Meaning they put dream shade all over their weapons and are going to massacre everyone in order to get their lost girl back. So they get to storybrooke in a creepy large group with their creepy cloaks and their weapons covered with dreamshade (arrows axes etc). Also can Pan have a crossbow like the one he had henry use on Felix?

Keep reading

On this day in history, 26th of May 1465, Elizabeth Woodville crowned queen of England In Westminster Abbey.

“Arrangements for Elizabeth’s coronation began as soon as the Christmas festivities were over, In January the King sent envoys to Philip, Duke of Burgundy, inviting him to send an appropriate delegation (and particularly his wife’s uncle, Jacques de Luxembourg, Seigneur de Richebourg) to represent him at the ceremony planned for Sunday before Pentecost, 26 May 1465. On 14 April 1465 Edward wrote to the Mayor of London to inform him that ” we have certainly appointed and concluded the coronation of our most dear and most entirely beloved wife the Queen to be in our palace at Westminster” and that the Mercers and other city companies should begin to prepare to receive her in an appropriate manner.

What were Elizabeth’s feelings at that great moment? We can only speculate but it is likely that foremost among them would have been apprehension, an apprehension stiffened by determination to fulfill her new role as England’s first lady . Perhaps now, for the first time, she sensed the reality, and the enormity of the task facing her, and the finality of the process which had begun with her simple, private wedding…she was acutely conscious that some thought her unsuitable and unworthy. Were they perhaps hoping for some lapse, some indication that she lacked the “queenliness” of a lady born into purple, and were they relieved or disappointed when everything ran smoothly? It was an exiting, almost dreamlike experience"

-  “Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower” by David Baldwin