total fave

5

Animagi? Animagi.

Newt’s animagus form is a Eurasian Red Squirrel, Tina’s is a pigeon, Graves’ is a greying timber wolf (most people assume he’s just a very large dog) and Credence’s is a Hebridean lamb/sheep :’ )

Meanwhile, Jacob had no idea what’s going on but he’s a little weirded out by all these vaguely familiar animals…

2

sixofcrowsnw challenge: take two ≡ best moment of your otp

kanej + religion

7

sooo thanks to reading heartstrings by @taylordraws i was up til 3am doodling this garbage. god help my lost soul.

also i’d been talking to @littleblackchat all day about it and she was designing up what she imagined Mari’s dress from chapter 3 looked like, and I doodled this version based on her descriptions and early doodles of it xD so it’s a little different from the one she posted. Also I pointed out that the keyhole in the dress was perfect for Adrien in that scene, since he put his hand there and gyid7573943778hsjdfj IMAGINE IT GUYS imagine it

María Izquierdo, Mexican painter, “Mis sobrinas”, 1940.

“María Izquierdo’s career helped open the door for many women artists. The Mexican artist’s prestige is often compared to that of Marie Laurencin from the School of Paris and although she is not as popularly known as Frida Kahlo, she helped establish a foundation for women artists. Maintaining value in art rooted in traditional Mexican values, Izquierdo’s art stood out for it s ingenious portrayals of Mexico among an area of highly politicized art. (…) A believer that women should have the chance to explore different professional realms, she also held strong to the traditional family roles instilled in her by her aunt and grandmother. While her painting /The Jewelry Box/ sends a satirical message surrounding the roles of woman roles and her work, Alegoría del trabajo (Allegory of Work) does provoke the idea of misogyny and oppression. Painting Mis Sobrinas (My Nieces) shows how she valued and believed in family ties and the “obligation” to family. She often depicted women in a variety of social settings and backgrounds, but only painted herself with her family or alone.[3]

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(…) Izquierdo made it clear through her paintings that she believed women could be active members of society, helping to perpetuate culture and define the national identity of Mexico. Her altar scenes in particular bring her intimate style together with themes of feminism and nationalism, drawing connections that were profound for her time. Through these cupboard altars, Mexican women were able to add a rich religious context to their everyday domestic roles, and thus “propagate their national culture, generational traditions, and religious beliefs” (Donovan 162).”

4

When the bromance jealousy kicks in. (2 / ?) 01

BONUS: TFW you have to do your homework before you can meet your bro.