tortoise vs. turtle

This is one of my favourite creepypastas, and because I can’t find any version of it that wouldn’t be impossible to read on this format, I’ve transcribed it directly from the screencap I have of it.

Story originally appeared on /x/ on October 10, 2013, and was written by a user known only as hawkeye !!ASKzWwNPKxw. Accompanying photograph was taken by me and isn’t associated with the piece in its original form. Aside from grammatical corrections and a quote from the author from a reply to another user at the end, the story appears exactly how it does in the original image.

It’s long, but well worth the read, and has stuck with me ever since I first saw it. For those of you that have experienced something like this, it’ll hit even harder.

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Human Nature

So, first let me describe how I’ve spent the last three summers.

>Live in Ohio
>Be camp counselor at INNAWOODS camps in hocking hills region of southern Ohio
>Clear creek valley is one of the most biodiverse areas in the entire world. (Not kidding. More than some rainforests)
>Nearest civilization is town of Rockbridge (TINY) many miles away.
>Everyone lives in cabins with no air conditioning, power, or lights
>I’m assigned to the older boys, because I’m better with the bushcraft
>Teach then bataonning, fire building, debris huts, edible plants, the works.
>One night every week, we camp out, use the skills, and sleep under the stars
>Every week, each cabin has to do a “Camp Improvement Project” (chores)
>Little kids pull weeds on what few (unpaved, barely maintained) paths we have
>Big kids (14-17) use saws, rakes, and shovels to clear out new campsites, or refurbish old ones
>There’s always been a rivalry between the older boys and girls, especially among the counselors

Keep reading

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Lonesome George, the Galapagos tortoise who was the last of his kind, is on view at the Museum through January 4, 2015. Below is a quick rundown of everything you need to know about Lonesome George.

Species: Last documented member of Chelonoidis abingdoni, native to Pinta Island

Age: Thought to be more than 100 years old

Diet: Cactus, shrubs, grasses, and broad-leaved plants

Turtle vs. tortoise? Tortoises are turtles that live exclusively on land.

Did you know? Lonesome George—the lone tortoise of his species for at least 40 years—was named after a famous 1950s American TV comedian, George Gobel, who called himself “Lonesome George.”

Notable traits: An extremely long neck and a “saddle-backed” shell that rises slightly in front, like a saddle

Weight: About 165 lbs (75 kg); males of various species of Galapagos tortoises can exceed 660 lbs (300 kg) and are the largest living tortoises

Discovery: In 1971, a Hungarian scientist spotted Lonesome George on Pinta Island. The discovery surprised researchers who thought Pinta Island tortoises were already extinct. A year later, George was taken to the Tortoise Breeding and Rearing Center on Santa Cruz Island, where he lived for the next 40 years. 

Saving Lonesome George: Staff at the Galapagos National Park and Charles Darwin Research Station tried repeatedly to mate Lonesome George with females from closely related species. Those efforts failed, but a new strategy to revive the species is underway. The discovery of hybrid tortoises partially descended from Pinta Island tortoises on Isabela Island, where whalers or pirates likely moved them long ago, provides the opportunity for establishing a breeding colony whose young will initiate the recovery of a reproductive population on Pinta.

Can’t get enough Lonesome George info? Head to the Museum’s website for more.