toronto to vancouver train

i was tagged by @buffylovesfaith to share 10 facts about myself! ily <3

  1. one time i travelled from toronto to vancouver by train. i spent 3 nights on that train and it was the coolest trip ive ever been on tbh. i love trains
  2. ummm currently i ship buffy/willow above everything else
  3. im sort of a hair model? cool stuff
  4. i began identifying as a lesbian last april (2016) and it has improved my sense of sense immensely
  5. im a 1993 baby
  6. ive been on dates with girls and guys but ive never kissed anyone!! rip
  7. i have many bad habits including biting my lips and chewing my cheeks
  8. ive eaten an absurd amount of pasta
  9. sometimes i write really bad poetry
  10. one day im gonna resume drawing my webcomic, and when i do, my depression will be gone, my skin will be clear, i’ll be married to @lesbihane, etc etc. life will be better is what im sayin
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Eastbound VIA Canadian - Glacier Stn - 1982 by Mike Dunham-Wilkie
Via Flickr:
Eastbound VIA Canadian at Glacier Station, BC
February 1, 1982

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Swift Current, Saskatchewan, 14 MAR'80

My first ride on this magnificent train, and my first exposure to western Canada, was from Winnipeg to Vancouver. As I boarded at “Winterpeg” late in the evening, the carman were knocking the ice that had accumulated underneath the steam heated train. During our stop at Portage la Prairie about 55 miles west of Winnipeg, where the train returned from CNR rails to its traditional CPR routing, I was treated to a view from my roomette bed that I will never forget. An eastbound “grain box” from the west - probably off the former CNoR line via Dauphin - curved in over the snowclad prairie that reflected an incredibly star studded indigo dome of midnight sky. The lead unit was a GP40 wide cab, with twinkling green lights to indicate that “another section follows.” Those images will always have to rely on memory as there aren’t any pictures. Breakfast came after the stop at Moose Jaw, and after that was the stop at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, where the CPR/VIA westbound #1, “The Canadian”, made another station stop and I was able to get this shot. A friend who worked for CPR in Revelstoke told me that this place was known among his fellow employees as “Speedy Creek”, but I’m sure that the creek was well frozen this morning!

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The VIA Rail Canadian in Banff - 1979 by Steve Brown
Via Flickr:
My mother and I took a vacation by train to the Canadian Rockies in 1979. We traveled on the VIA Rail “Canadian” from Toronto to Lake Louise, Alberta. Here we have just departed the Banff station stop in the heart of Banff National Park and are alongside one of several lovely lakes at the edge of town. I’ll mention that I took the photo from an open dutch door in the vestibule of our sleeping car, so this was shot in the open air rather than through a window. View my collections on flickr here: Collections

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CP 1406, VIA 1965, and VIA 1423 with VIA’s Canadian at Field, BC in May 1982 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
A Roger Puta Photograph

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CP 1406, VIA 1965, and VIA 1423 with the westbound Canadian departing Stephen at Kicking Horse Pass and passing Sink Lake in May 1982 R22 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
A Roger Puta Photograph

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Vancouver, British Columbia, 17 MAR'80

VIA/CPR eastbound #2 “The Canadian” awaits departure from CNR station. The CPR had left their own station in Vancouver to other uses. Even more strangely, the CNR station was accessed by former Great Northern trackage; the BN and CN shared - and I assume they still share - a stretch of two main track CTC operation that is used by the trains to reach the CN station. Those Superliners in the distance are probably the Amtrak train I took to Seattle.

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CP Rail the Canadian at the CP station in Vancouver, BC, October 1978 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
Canadian Pacific A Roger Puta Photo

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Ottawa, Ontario, 10 June'77

After my return to Montreal from the Maritimes, I rode Canadian Pacific’s proud “Canadian” to Ottawa. The old Union Station, convenient to the center - or centre - of Canada’s capitol city, had been converted from rail use (still used, I believe, as a convention or visitor center), and the replacement was an expensive taxi ride away from town and convenient hotels. This was my train from Montreal: seven cars behind an FP9 and FP7 duo (1410-1403), as it awaited departure.

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Medicine Hat, Alberta, 14 MAR'80

Gordon Lightfoot’s song “Alberta Bound” mentions that “a chinook wind is a-movin’ in”, and in “The Hat” it was probably doing just that, as VIA/CPR westbound #1 “The Canadian” pauses for refueling and station work behind an FP7, RS10, GP9 (1413-8475-8527.) The temperature must have been in the ‘50s (fahrenheit - you Canadians can figure out the celsius.) I had another chance to walk around and this time chose the head end. Like Don Marson says, that steam generator equipped RS10 from MLW would be more at home in eastern Canada than here. Power was changed at Calgary and I’m sure the outlander returned to more Alco-friendly shops, although at this time the folks at Ogden Shops in Calgary were familiar with the big six-axle MLW products that were - maybe - still hanging around (I think by this time the almighty SD40-2 pretty much ruled the CPR mountains.)

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CP 1406 with VIA’s westbound Canadian just west of Canmore, Alberta with the 3 sisters in the background in May 1982 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
A Roger Puta Photograph

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A Westbound Canadian, Kicking Horse Pass, 1982 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
Roger Puta took this interesting 4-photo sequence of CP 1406, VIA 1965, and VIA 1423 with a westbound Canadian in May 1982. Thanks go to Train Orders member cp1400 who wrote this caption for the sequence, “The Canadian is between Yoho and Cathedral on CP’s big hill from Kicking Horse Pass to Field. The train is entering the lower spiral tunnel and will loop to the right and come out underneath this track about where the pile of white rocks are that are seen to the left of the train. Sadly this view is no longer possible because the trees have grown to the point you can hardly see the track.”

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CN Super Continental 1970 , near Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Photo 6 of 6 by CLIFF BANCROFT
Via Flickr:
Almost at the end of our 3-day train trip from Montreal to Vancouver, our train makes the sharp 90-degree turn to head across the CN’s Fraser River swing-bridge adjacent to the Pattullo road bridge in the Vancouver suburb of New Westminster. As viewed from the dome observation car. Photo 6 of 6 of this journey. (see also 2011 photo adjacent in my photostream) Epson V500 scan of 35mm Kodachrome 25 slide.

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Super Continental approaches Jasper by Tim Repp
Via Flickr:
CN’s westbound Super Continental approaches Jasper on a stormy Aug 21, 1975.

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Candy Stripes in the Rockies by Joe McMillan
Via Flickr:
Canadian Pacific streamliner No. 2, the eastbound CANADIAN exits the tunnel at Mile 133.1 and passes over the west switch at Cathedral siding on June 15, 1975. Cathedral is located on CP’s Laggan Subdivision three and a half miles east of Field, British Columbia. The train is about to pass under the Trans Canada Highway as it proceeds toward the Lower Spiral Tunnel en route to Calgary and points east.

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228-23 Super Cont Kamloops Turntable by Tim Repp
Via Flickr:
The westbound CN Super Continental arrives at Kamloops Junction, August 3, 1975.

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CP 1406 with VIA’s Waterton Park on the westbound Canadian just west of Canmore, Alberta in May 1982 by Marty Bernard
Via Flickr:
A Roger Puta Photograph

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278-12 Super Cont Louis Ck by Tim Repp
Via Flickr:
CN’s eastbound Super Continental winds around the North Thompson River near Louis Creek, BC, July 5, 1975.

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VIA Rail Canadian at Lake Louise, Alberta - 1979 by Steve Brown
Via Flickr:
My mother and I took a vacation to the Canadian Rockies in July, 1979. We traveled from Toronto to Lake Louise, Alberta on the VIA Rail Canada “Canadian” transcontinental streamliner. After our nine wonderful days in the mountains, we boarded the train in Field, BC and took the train east to Winnipeg, where we continued home by air. I took this photo in Lake Louise on July 4 (not a holiday in Canada, lol) as the train continued west to Vancouver after we detrained. The vista-dome observation lounge was a stylish punctuation mark at the end of the train, and is still in use on the Canadian today. View my collections on flickr here: Collections Press “L” for a larger image on black.

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CN Super Continental service to Vancouver by Robert Taylor
Via Flickr:
CN Flagship Train “Super Continental” ran in two sections in summer between Toronto and Vancouver and Montréal and Vancouver. During the off season the trains would be combined/separated at Capreol, Ontario. Although it promised dome service Toronto to Vancouver, in actuality the former Milwaukee Road full length domes only operated between Jasper, Alberta and Vancouver. The Super Continental took a northerly route across Ontario to Winnipeg and thence to Saskatoon, Edmonton and Vancouver.
August 1970