top100movies

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Arthur Penn
Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

Producer: Tatira Hiller, Warner Bros, Warren Beaty
Screenplay: David Newman, Robert Benton
Cinematography: Burnett Guffey

“They’re young, they’re in love and they kill people.” was the effective publicity line of this most stylish and uncompromising of gangster pictures based on a true story. In this film, the bank robbers are portrayed as heroic and romantic-star-crosses-lovers caught up in a whirl of violence and passion, meticulously evoked by posed photographes in sepia. The black comedy moves inevitably toward the much imitated ending in slow motion-the pair die in a hail of bullets.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Joel & Ethan Coen
Fargo (1996)

Director: Joel Coen
Producer: Ethan Coen
Screenplay: Joel & Ethan Coen
Cinematography: Roger Deakins
Music: Carter Burwell

“ Brothers Joel and Ethan Coen hit the big time with their sixth film, Fargo. A cleverly plotted thriller set effectively in snowy Minnesota. ‘the abstract landscape of our childhood–a bleak,windswept tundra, resembling Siberia except fot its Ford dealerships, and Hardee’s restaurants. Superbly photographed against a snowy background, the film moves seamlessly between black humor, violent crime drama, and genial comedy, while weaving a good yarn. The semi-stylized dialogue, so important to the Coens’ films, is given another dimension by the 'yah-yah’ rhythm of the local Minnesotan dialect.” - Ronald Bergan, The Film Book, 2011.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Stanley Donen & Gene Kelly
Singin’ In The Rain (1952)

Director: Stanley Donen, Gene Kelly
Producer: Arthur Freed
Screenplay: Betty Comden, Adolph Green
Cinematography: Harold Rosson
Music: Arthur Freed, Nacio Herb Brown, Betty Comden, Johnny Green, Roger Edens

“Singin’ in the rain is a delightful mixture of nostalgia and affectionate satire on the turmoil and triumphs that beset the transition from silent films to the talkies. The famous "Singin’ in the rain” song showed off the balletic and hoofing skills of Gene Kelly as Don Lockwood to memorable effect. Kelly’s talent were also seen in the Broadway ballet sequence, while Donald O'Connor's electrifying comedy-dance routine, Make ‘Em Laugh, was the peak of his career.“ - Ronald Bergan, The Film Book, 2011.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Martin Scorsese
Taxi Driver (1976)

Director: Martin Scorsese
Screenplay: Paul Schrader
Cinematography: Michael Chapman
Music: Bernard Herrmann.

“This deeply disturbing drama, which examines alienation in urban society by combining elements of film noir, the Western, and horror movies. established Martin Scorsese as a major figure in world film and made Robert De Niro a star. De Biro immerses himself in the complex character. Scorsese presents an apocalyptic view of the city, with steam hissing out of the streets, incessant traffic noise, and wailing sirens. This is contrasted with the haunting score by Bernard Herrmann (his last).”- Ronald Bergan, The Film Book, 2011.

Take a look at Dan Perri’s title design, the best quote , and the comparison with Drive (2011)

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Alfred Hitchcock
VERTIGO (1958)

Producer: Alfred Hitchcock
Screenplay: Alec Coppel, Samuel Taylor
Cinematography: Robert Burks
Music: Bernard Herrmann
Title Design: Saul Bass

“Vertigo is an absorbing study of sexual obsession, which makes the twists in the plot almost irrelevant. With its central tragic love story, it is one of the few Hitchcock films to move audiences emotionally. It also has been acclaimed for its innovative use of camera techniques, such as forward zoom and reverse tracking shots, to intensify the atmosphere of suspense.” - Ronald Bergan, The Film Book, 2011.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Ang Lee
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000)

Producer: Li-Kong Hsu, William King, Ang Lee
Screenplay: Hui-Ling Wang, James Schamus, Kuo Jung Tsai
Cinematography: Peter Pau

The Chinese tradition of wuxia storytelling combines swordplay, martial arts, and Tao Buddhist philosophy. The movies’ greatest exponent of the form was Hong Kong director King Hu, to whom Ang Lee pays tribute in this sweeping, romantic action film. The first Chinese-language movie to become a worldwide hit, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon made more than $100 million in North America alone. The movie made a splash at the Academy Awards by capturing 4 of the 10 Oscars for which it was nominated. It had the unique honor of being nominated both for best picture and for best foreign-language picture. This was an extraordinary feat for a film in a genre (martial arts) that is often dismissed by critics and in a language (Mandarin) other than English, with subtitles, which is too often dismissed by the moviegoing masses.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by John Lasseter
Toy Story (1995)

Producer: Bonnie Arnold, Ed Catmull, Ralph Guggenheim, Steve Jobs
Screenplay: Joss Whedon, Joel Cohen, Andrew Stanton, Alec Sokolow

The first feature-length blockbuster by Pixar, a pioneer of computer-animated films in the 1980s, Toy Story was also its first feature to be released in movie theaters. Lasseter’s CGI has a synthetic texture that suits the film, but also displays a fluidity and dynamism that the old animation style cannot match. However, Pixar’s strengths go back to the drawing board: a rich story sense, fresh perspectives, and unforgettable characters created imaginatively, and with originality. Pixar developed a corporate culture that nourished creativity and was rewarded with one hit film after another.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Wim Wenders
Paris, Texas (1984)

Producer: Don Guest, Anatole Dauman
Screenplay: Sam Shepard
Cinematography: Robby Müller
Music: Ry Cooder

The title of the film suggests a meeting between the new and the old world, and Paris, Texas expertly reworks elements of both classical Hollywood and European art cinema in this successful collaboration between the German director Wim Wenders and the American writer Sam Shepard. 

Wenders saw his chance to explore the vast American landscape — both urban and rural — in Paris, Texas and used it as the setting for the story of Travis, his lonely and lost protagonist. Brilliantly portrayed by the melancholy character actor Harry Dean Stanton, Travis does not speak for the opening 20 minutes, and is first seen walking alone in the Texan desert. Neither he nor the audience knows where he comes from or where he is going. Gradually we learn that he wishes to see Hunter (Hunter Carson), the son he left some years ago in the care of his brother Walt (Dean Stockwell), and is trying to find his estranged French wife Jane (Nastassja Kinski), hoping, in vain, to put the pieces of his life back together again. He does find his wife and son, only to lose them once again. Wenders, with the help of Ry Cooder’s haunting score and Robby Müller’s stunning camerawork, evokes a poignant world in which communication between people has become complex but not impossible.

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[TOP 100 MOVIES]

A film by Giuseppe Ternatore
Cinema Paradiso (1988)

Producer: Franco Cristaldi, Giovanna Romagnoli
Screenplay: Giuseppe Ternatore
Cinematography: Blasco Giurato

This heartwarming, nostalgic film looks at the lure of cinema and the death of the picture palace through the eyes of a child. Understandably, Cinema Paradiso has become one of the most popular Italian films of the last few decades, both outside and inside Italy.

The story, told in flashbacks, of Salvatore (Salvatore Cascio), a little boy who lives with his harassed widowed mother in the grimness of a small, war-torn Sicilianvillage, and finds refuge from the daily misery of life by sneaking into Nuovo Cinema Paradiso, the local cinema hall. The projectionist, Alfredo (Philippe Noiret), soon becomes his friend and teacher. A poignant reminder, helped by Ennio Morricone’s haunting musical score, of how personal the cinema experience can be, Cinema Paradiso. is a film that stirs memories of childhood.