top tips

💪Shoplifting😫🛍 Protip 💵

Step 1: go to ur local Walmrt

Step 2: go to th sports + outdoors aisle

Step 3: locate the weights

Step 4: pick them all up one by one

Step 5: put them all back (one by one)

Step 6: leave the store

Step 7: never come back

💥CONFIGURATIONS‼️ u have SUCCessfully 💅 shop LIFTED💪💪💪 NEVER STOP THE GRIND BRO 🔥🥇

Okay so this sounds random as hell but seriously hear me out

After you and your s/o finish fucking. And you’re both laid cuddling, happy, content and chill. Put on a fallout 3/new Vegas playlist on Spotify in the background and just lay there together listening to it. Sounds random and stupid but it really is chill af even if you’re not a fallout fan

So the boys come into my apartment and I’m wearing a robe. I’m only wearing a robe. And I say “why don’t you come up to my boudoir and watch me to a monologue?” and they say “where’s the bed?” and I say “this is the bed right here” and they say “can we sit on the bed” and I say “sure but these are expensive Japanese linen” and they say “but they’re not even soft” and I say “sometimes… things that are expensive….. are worse”

How to get straight A’s in college. Seriously.

Yes, even if you’re taking the maximum credit load. Because if I can do it, you can do it too. Note: My credit load also included a handful of honors courses. 

Side-note: I’m going to be a junior (how??) and an RA (!!!) in the fall. Life moves fast. College moves faster. Anyways, 

Here are my top tips: 

1. LOOK AT THE SYLLABUS AND WRITE EVERYTHING DOWN. This is step number one, and it’s not up for debate. If you do this, there’ll be no surprises, and if there are: point it out to the professor (a simple, ??? this wasn’t on the syllabus ??, usually works). Also, you have to check and see what constitutes as an A in that class. Sometimes it’s a 90, sometimes it’s not. (a 96 was an A- in one of my classes last semester. I’m so serious.)

2. Get a calendar. Not a planner. One of those giant calendars with puppies or something on it and write down everything you have to do for the month. Put it above your desk. This helps A LOT because you can see everything you have coming up for the next few weeks, instead of jus playing it day-by-day. 

3. It is OK to use ratemyprofessor. Sometimes it can be really helpful, but pay attention to the more in depth reviews that talk about what the homework, tests, quizzes and projects are like (instead of “her lectures are boring :///) 

4. Sit in the front of your class. You’ll be more likely to pay attention and less likely to scroll through instagram. (by the way, mine is @parissdb :) It also grabs your professors attention, so even if you’re shy, they’ll at least know your face.

5. Do that extra credit. A lot of professors offer it in the beginning of the semester, and hardly anyone does it because no one’s thinking past tomorrow. It may be what saves you in the long run. 

6. Figure out your best method of note-taking. For me, it’s good ol pen and paper. It helps me remember everything. Some people prefer typing it out. This is beneficial bc it makes it easier for you to find exactly what you’re looking for. (Thank you, command + F)

7. Put your effort into the percentages. If an assignment is worth 1% of your grade, do it well, but don’t exhaust yourself. It’s 1%!!!! If it comes down to it, spend more time studying for that exam that’s worth 30% than the group project worth 20. 

8. Please. Stop studying what you already know. We’re all guilty of it. It makes you feel better knowing you have chapters 1-3 down, even if you don’t know 4-7. The key to studying is to learn what you don’t know. 

9. Learn how to study. (Yes, it’s actually a skill that has to be learned.) I’m the biggest procrastinator I know, especially when it comes to studying. But I’ve found that studying 2 days before an exam usually does the trick for me. I create a master study guide during day 1 and study it all on day 2. Depending on what time the exam is, I may review on the morning of day 3. 

10. SAVE SOME TIME FOR FUN ffs. Seriously. You don’t have to study 24/7, and I don’t know about y’all but my attention span was not built for that.

I might add more to this later, or make another post because I could give these tips for ever and ever. But hopefully this helps someone out there. 

Be sure to check out my college tab here:(http://thesoontobenewyorker.tumblr.com/tagged/college) and follow me on instagram @parissdb (https://www.instagram.com/parissdb/) for more stuff. :) 

How to deal with losing interest in your language class:

As a student in a higher-level French and who is self-studying two other languages, I know for a fact that taking a foreign language can get stressful and overwhelming. To learn a ton of grammar, humongous amounts of vocab, and to know how a mind in another culture works, it can get super hard sometimes. All that stuff that goes into learning a foreign language can make it super easy to get burnt-out. And we’ve all done it. Trust me. But, it’s okay, my dude. We’ve all been there. It sucks, but you’ll get over it. Here are some tips how: 

i. take your time 

Listen, my dudes, it can be so difficult to learn a foreign language and you should already be proud of yourself for doing so!! Even in a fast-paced class, you should take it slow and make sure you don’t beat yourself over not getting it in perfect time. Language takes practice, and sometimes we don’t get it as fast as we want it. it’s okay. 

ii. ask questions/talk to the professor

Are you totally lost? Tell someone. It could be a classmate, a native speaker you’ve befriended, or your instructor. Either way, I highly recommend you talk to someone if you’re stuck on a specific concept or feel unmotivated. You sometimes need a boost from a study buddy in your target language. 

iii. remember why you’re studying

My go-to method for when I’m having a bad day in French or I’m just not getting something is simple. I simply ask myself: “Why am I doing this?” No reason is not good enough for choosing to learn a specific language. Learning languages has its benefits and even if you just like the sound of it is reason enough to learn it! Trust me, I have no incentive for learning my target language. But I love it, and I refuse to give it up when it gets difficult. 

iv. study on your own 

To be honest, this is super super important anyway. You absolutely NEED to practice a language on your own, whether you feel like it or not. Without some practice, you’re going to feel completely lost in class sometimes. You can have fun with this too: take this time to familiarize yourself with the culture more. Personally, it’s always helpful to watch movies in French or listen to music in Spanish. I learn to enjoy my target language more and to have fun with it!

v. take a break

We all get unmotivated sometimes. Yeah, language learning takes a lot of work, but sometimes it helps to take a step back and refresh a little. Focus on other schoolwork or maybe find something new to occupy your time. Being burnt out on learning a language sucks, I know, but sometimes it’s best to ride the wave a little bit. 

My Top Tips for Cold Reading ~

So, it’s a common scenario: you’re in an audition, either having been asked to prepare a monologue/song or having been told to prepare nothing - the casting director hands you a script and says “We’d like to see how you handle sight-reading this script, we’ll give you five minutes outside to look over it and then we’ll ask you to come back in and deliver the scene to us.” The panic, dread and downright terror that comes alongside the prospect of cold-reading a piece of text to an audition panel is a common sensation that most actors are all too familiar with. So, what is cold reading? It is when you’re handed a piece of script that you haven’t prepared (and so do not know off-by-heart) and most likely have never seen before. It can be a daunting prospect at the best of times, so I’ve come up with some of my top tips to help make the process easier for you:

🎭 READ IT AT LEAST TWICE. Yes, read the entire thing from beginning to end at least twice before you even start considering character and vocals/physicality etc. This will familiarise you with the text so it will come more naturally to you in a few minutes’ time when you have to perform it to the audition panel. This will also help you to resist the temptation to look down at the script the whole time, which can really inhibit your acting.

🎭It might help to read the text out loud once to get a sense of how the words feel as you say them

🎭if it’s a duologue or a bigger scene, I can’t stress enough how important it is to read the other characters’ parts too! DO NOT just read your character’s lines as this will stop you from getting an overall impression of the scene, not only in terms of cues, but also the dynamics you need to playing upon

🎭Don’t keep your face glued to the page when you’re back in the audition room. Even if this means you have to take the text at a slower pace, at least the panel will be able to see your face and it gives the impression of confidence. 

🎭 Don’t let the fact that it is an unseen text stop you from using your physicality during the audition. It’s impossible for you to have fully developed a character in the five minutes of prep time, but the panel will appreciate an evident effort to think about how the character might move (the same goes for vocal quality/tone). It is still an acting audition after all.

🎭 Following on from the last point, focus on the acting as opposed to getting all of the words 100% correct, especially if you struggle with reading. The panel are much more interested and receptive to seeing someone get some of the text wrong but who really brings the character to life as opposed to someone who reads completely fluently and accurately but with no vocal or physical personality

***POTENTIAL, NOT PERFECTION***

Cold reading may seem daunting but, at the end of the day, it’s just text on some paper and it’s not a crafty trap laid down by the audition panel to catch you out and humiliate you - it’s merely another method of assessing your suitability for the part. I hope these tips helped and put your mind at ease! x

Back to School: How to Get an A*/8 or 9 in an English Lit Essay!

Happy September, everyone!

As we all get our gears in motion to start a new year, I thought I would share my top tips for scoring the highest marks in English Literature essays. 

(P.S. Lots of these tips are applicable to other subjects too)


1. Don’t write about the character as if they are real

Unfortunately, this is a common error in English Lit essays. It is absolutely imperative to remember that a character is not a person, but is a construct of the writer in order to present an idea or theme. No matter the question, you should be linking your answer back to the writer’s ideas and theme of the text, even if it doesn’t seem obvious what the theme is on the first inspection of the question. Using the author’s name frequently in your essay will demonstrate that you recognise the character is not a real person - ‘Shakespeare portrays Macbeth as a tragic hero, as defined by Aristotle as…’

2. Don’t analyse the plot

Avoid analysing the plot or when things happen in the text. Don’t write ‘When X happens it makes us think Y’. Instead:

  • Analyse the writer’s use of language, structure and form to create meaning
  • Do a close language analysis of specific words/phrases, including a sound analysis (plosives, assonance, etc.)
  • Do a structural analysis of what happens when and why that’s important (Freytag’s pyramid)
  • Do an analysis of form (stage directions, dramatic monologue, etc.)

3. Keep your answer relevant throughout

You need to be explicitly answering the question - not going off on a tangent nor trying to change the question to suit an answer that you want to write. One way of avoiding this is by starting each paragraph with a topic sentence, summarising what that paragraph is going to be about and how it answers the question. Another method is simply by rewording the question into your answer at the start and end of every paragraph. At least. For greater impact, include synonyms of the word, which can also help with the readability of your answer.

4. Avoid PEE/PEEL/etc. where you can

Thousands of students are taught the same, basic Point-Evidence-Explain (or variant) analytical paragraph structure. If you want to stand out, show academic strength, and achieve the highest marks then you must break free from the chains of PEE! (This also applies for your introduction format. ‘In this essay, I will argue…’ gets pretty dull after reading it 100 times)

For my students, I will be teaching them to write What-How-Why paragraphs:

WHAT has the writer done?

HOW have they done it?

WHY have they done it/is it effective?

This way, your focus is always on why the writer has chosen to use that specific language/structure/form, but it allows you to be creative in crafting your response. Being able to discuss the ‘why’ of literature is the key to unlocking the highest grades. Reading through examiners’ reports this summer has made one thing clear - it is not enough to merely spot linguistic devices or structural features. You must explain why the writer has chosen them and why that is an effective choice (or not).

5. Avoid sweeping statements about context

The main advice here is to only include comments about the context of the text if it adds to the analytical point that you are making. They should not be a bolt-on sentence, but they should enhance your answer.

Further, sweeping claims like ‘All Jacobean women were oppressed by society’ is far too vague. On the other hand, a comment like ‘Lady Macbeth is a disturbing example of womanhood because she denies her gender at a time where the role of a woman was clear-cut, even patriarchal, in Jacobean society’ suggests that you have a greater understanding of how context can influence the writer’s choices.

6. A plan is your best friend

Always, always make time to plan your answer. A method I recommend is, first, circling the key words in the question (character/theme, what you are asked to do, where in the text you are asked to look, etc.). Secondly, write all of your ideas down onto the page, highlighting parts from the extract if you have that in front of you. Finally, select a judicious number of points that you are going to talk about (quality not quantity here) and number the order in which you are going to make them.

If you are writing a comparative essay, each paragraph must start and end with a comparative point about whatever it is you are comparing (characters/themes/etc.) I suggest the following format:

X is presented in both text A and text B. However, in A the author uses device 1 and 2 to demonstrate X. On the other hand, in B, the author demonstrates X via use of device 2 and 3.’ Then write one paragraph for each text. Repeat this again for another similarity. And again for a third - if you think that is appropriate.


Click HERE if you want more top tips/resources/essay advice/study motivation!!

Click HERE if you want more top tips/resources/essay advice/study motivation!!


Photo credit @eintsein 🌻

idk if yall remember but i asked if yall want me to start this lil series a long time ago but i’ve finally gotten onto it!! u’d be surprised to find out how many of this can save u lots of $$ too and i still have a lot of posts to come so look out for them ٩◔‿◔۶

  • get urself a water bottle
    • i was shocked to find out sm people don’t have bottles of their own??
    • reduces waste   
    • save $$ by never buying plastic bottles bc u can just refill it
  • also get urself a tumbler
    • so u can use ur own at cafes and starbucks
    • such a good investment u buy a $10 cup && save 10₵ everytime
    • if u drink 4 coffees a week that’s $20 saved a year
  • take the public transport / bike / walk
    • esp if u have time after school and when ur not in a rush
    • extremely therapeutic and is a great stress relief
    • u can rent bikes now which is rly cool
  • draw ur curtains
    • apparently 10% of energy can be saved on heating when u let sunlight in
    • saving money too how cool
  • turn ur thermostat down by 1°C
    • or up if u use air conditioning
    • apparently u can save up to $60 a year
    • or just turn it down by 5 degrees and hibernate in ur hoodie + a thick ass blanket bc it’s rly comfy and u should try it
  • shop w reusable shopping bags
    • or just bring a huge bag u can dump stuff into
    • some places deduct a few cents if u don’t use plastic bags isn’t that gr10
  • reuse plastic bags
    • don’t throw them out bros
    • u can line ur bins w them
    • if u need a change of clothes throw them in a plastic bag before u throw it in ur bag
    • after u gym or smt throw ur sweaty clothes in a plastic bag so it doesn’t stench up ur bag
    • and check if the plastic bags are recyclable before u recycle them!!
  • buy refills instead of new pens
    • let’s be real ur gonna buy the same pen
    • so just get refills instead it’s sm cheaper + u get 10 in a box
    • just google “(pen name) refill” it’s rly easy
    • some shops sell refills at the counter u can go ask
    • (@ sg and msia fam,, popular bookshop does)
  • STOP BUYING NEW PENCILS
    • literally just get ONE mechanical pencil
    • and get urself some pencil lead
    • idk why every back to school haul has like 5 pencils
    • yo pencil lead refill is a thing my brothers
    • and a box costs less than a pencil and lasts for more than a year
    • is this not a thing??
  • eat meatless some days
    • did u kno giving up beef will reduce ur carbon footprint more than if u give up ur car
    • but lol still gotta live that cheeseburger and kbbq life from time to time
    • so just cut out the meat like 1 or 2 days a week
    • and no mutton and beef and pork and turkey if u can help it
  • save and recycle paper pls !!11!1
    • use both sides!
    • recycle don’t trash!
    • buy recycled paper and notebooks!

that is all kiddos if u have more ways to save the earth pls inbox me here!! and check out my other study tips too:

on types of learners // my top tips // on exam prep // on sleep // on e-devices // on chinese resources // on notes