tool wallet

anonymous asked:

I've been professionally diagnosed inattentive. But I find I don't get distracted as much as sort of give up on things? I know I can do them, they're just not interesting enough. And I realized that when I procrastinate it's not really because I'm actively avoiding the thing. Like I'm not on tumblr because I like it so much better than work, it's just that I don't feel a strong incentive either way (unless there's a deadline). Is this ADHD or could it be something else?

This is executive functioning, which is pretty much what ADHD is. The types of problems you’re having are actually hallmarks of Inattentive ADHD!

In fact, if you look at the diagnostic criteria, you need five or six of these symptoms in order to be diagnosed with Inattentive ADHD:

  • Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or with other activities.
  • Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.
  • Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
  • Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked).
  • Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.
  • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
  • Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g. school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
  • Is often easily distracted
  • Is often forgetful in daily activities.

Notice that only two of these nine symptoms have to do specifically with attention and distraction.

(And this is why I say that Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is a really bad name for it.)

-J

Tony Stark ADHD Part 1

After seeing this post I decided to do a post about the DSM V diagnostic criteria for ADHD as it applies to Tony Stark. Since Tony is over the age of 17 he needs 5/9 criteria. (Under the age of 17 requires 6/9)

Part 1 will focus on inattentiveness  part 2 (Link Here) will focus on Hyperactivity

1. Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in  schoolwork, work, or during other activities (e.g. overlooks or misses details, work is inaccurate).

This seems as if it doesn’t apply at first glance, Tony generally makes incredibly detailed and accurate products with a few exceptions, but the thing to consider here is that making things isn’t his only job, and he failed to give close attention to detail on the business side of SI during Iron Man 1. 

2.Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities (e.g., has  difficulty remaining focused during lectures, conversations, or lengthy reading).

When Pepper was talking seriously with him Tony was thoroughly distracted, and this seems to be a general trend, he frequently admits to having forgotten conversations with people like Yinsen, or Killian, who he agreed to meet with while distracted. 

3.Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly (e.g., mind seems elsewhere, even in the absence of any obvious distraction).

Tony does seem to frequently drift from conversations, and he tends to play it off as a joke. It even happens during the senate hearing in Iron Man 2. 

4.Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish school work, chores, or duties in the work place (e.g., starts tasks but quickly loses focus and is easily  sidetracked).

Tony is known for doing his own thing, and not listening directly to orders. It’s a constant nuisance to whoever is trying to tell him what to do. This can however lead to some pretty innovative thinking.

5.Often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities (e.g., difficulty managing sequential tasks; difficulty keeping materials and belongings in order; messy, disorganized work; has poor time management; fails to meet deadlines).

I think Pepper and Rhodey would be the first people to tell you that Tony is awful at time management, and his lab is a mess.

6.Often avoids or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (e.g. schoolwork or homework; for older adolescents and adults, preparing reports,  completing forms, reviewing lengthy papers).

This one again doesn’t really apply, Tony loves his lengthy projects like JARVIS, but what about paper work for Pepper? He’s not so keen on it. 

7.Often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).

This one doesn’t really fit, but that seems to be partially due to Tony doing nearly everything electronically. You can’t lose a pen if your pen is a hologram. 

8. Is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli (e.g., for older adolescents and adults may include unrelated thoughts).

We see him attempting to make an omelette, and being so distracted by how to talk to Pepper about the Palladium poisoning that the omelette comes out… wrong. 

9. Is often forgetful in daily activities (e.g., doing chores, running errands; for older adolescents and adults, returning calls, paying bills, keeping appointments).

Well Tony certainly seems to meet the diagnostic criteria for ADHD and it explains a lot more than I expected it to actually. 

imreallyawkwardirl  asked:

Hi! For a long time I've been wondering if I have inattentive ADHD. If you could you give me some more symptoms other than the basic ones like being forgetful/having trouble focusing/not being able to read for a long time etc. that would be great!

The Inattentive Criteria for ADHD in the DSM-5, as per the CDC:

  • Often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, at work, or with other activities.
  • Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.
  • Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.
  • Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked).
  • Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.
  • Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).
  • Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g. school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).
  • Is often easily distracted
  • Is often forgetful in daily activities.

Basically you’re looking at carelessness, inattention (including on preferred activities), lack of follow-through, disorganization, difficulty with sustained mental effort, difficulty keeping track of possessions, distractability, and forgetfulness. If you need some more real-world type examples of these criteria, let us know and we’ll see what we can do! (Note that you need at least six of these criteria if you’re 16 or under, and at least 5 if you’re 17 or older.)

-J

I’d like to follow more knitting/crochet blogs now that i’ve officially started this hobby!

Like or reblog this or whatever you want to do if you post knitting or crochet or crafts etc. and i’ll check out your blog!

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submitted by Andre Philip

The usual edc with a serrated folder and a miniscule fixed blade

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Bike Patch and Tool by Rethink Canada

The Patch

Got a flat tire? Wish you were closer to your friendly neighbourhood bike shop? Well, if that shop is Broke Bike Alley and you’ve got their business card, then what you’ve got there is a handy dandy tire patch.

The Tool

Broke Bike Alley’s business cards help you help your bike. The follow-up to their tire patch business card, this card cum tool fits in your wallet and lets you adjust your bolts and spokes. And open your beer.

Illustrator in Rome, Italy

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Environmental Consultant in Florida

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  • Seiko SNK809 “Seiko 5” Automatic wristwatch with NATO strap: Simple, well made and inexpensive. With the NATO strap I don’t even notice it on my wrist.
  • Leatherman Wave multi tool: Well designed and rugged. I use it almost daily.
  • Herschel Supply Charlie Wallet: Basic, thin wallet. Since I carry my cash in my front pocket, this wallet is perfect for a few credit cards and a driver’s license.
  • Fisher Space Pen: This pen has been in my pocket daily for over 10 years. Small, reliable and writes on almost anything.

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submitted by Johnny Brown

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submitted by Johnny Brown

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