tomsell!wilson

3

(There are no Ultron spoilers in this piece).

Joss Whedon doesn’t understand Steve Rogers. That’s not news. Lots of people think Steve Rogers — and as an extension of Steve Rogers, Captain America  — is boring. That’s also not news, though it continues to boggle me. Captain America is not self-righteous nor a goody-goody nor incapable of fun nor does he take himself too seriously, though it’s easy (and lazy) to interpret him that way. I get it. I do. I just don’t agree.

Captain America is important to me. Not just Steve (though I love him) or Bucky (whose face I might tattoo on my own face at some point, if they can ever get his character design consistent) or Sam (who is an inspired choice for the mantle, frankly). It’s not just America Chavez or Eli Bradley, though I adore them both. Captain America as a legacy, as a concept, as an aspiration is important to me. And so Joss Whedon’s total lack of understanding, and the fandom’s occasional dismissal of him, cuts me to the quick.

The thing about taking a man who “died” in WWII and putting him on a modern screen is that it’s hard to parse exactly what kind of trauma he’s been through, especially in a rotating and ever-increasing cast of characters. Something will always be lacking. That’s understandable, and in most cases it is what it is. But I think the most egregious thing lacking from Joss Whedon’s portrayal of Steve Rogers is that trauma, that vital and horrible thing that turned Steve from a kid who threw himself at a war to a man who doesn’t know how to do anything else.

The story of Captain America (any Captain America, not just Steve), more than any other superhero legacy mantle, is the story of a person who has taken a trauma and decided how it will define them. There is no argument in the lives of various Captains America that trauma is something that can be shucked off like a husk; instead, they’re about control. This is what happened to me. This is what I am doing with it. That’s the magic. That’s the sparkle. That is the thing I needed to read as a teenager muddling at being an adult in college, coping with the trauma of abuse and the remnants an eating disorder and one monster of an anxiety disorder. I needed reminding that trauma does not unmake a hero; rather, trauma is and can be the thing that creates one.

I think a lot about Bucky Barnes when I think about this. I think about how Bucky is beloved by women in particular, especially since Captain America: The Winter Soldier. I wonder if it has to do with feeling silenced; with feeling a lack of agency, even if and as we fight; with feeling puppeted around by what we should or must be in order to be the version of ourselves someone else is insisting on.

There are sometimes arguments about whether Bucky’s a hero or a villain, whether he’s a victim or so far from himself that the only thing left of him is a weapon. These arguments really only happen around the MCU Bucky, tbh. And they’re halfhearted at best, because no one truly believes that Bucky Barnes deserves any fate other than redemption, though he’s committed atrocities that would infuriate and horrify us if we were to list them.

I read the arc where Bucky becomes Captain America in the comics with my heart thumping heavily in places it didn’t normally thump — the joint of my thumb, the base of my spine, the inner parts of my wrists. Because Bucky could only have become Captain America through the facts of his trauma: what they made of him, and what he made of them.

Anyone can be him. Rather, anyone who is willing to be the best version of themselves – or to try, even if they fail – can be Captain America. It’s not the best version of yourself that makes you worthy of the mantle, because the best version of yourself is always temporary. It’s the trying.

I like to remember that, while I am trying.

khaleesi

‘M SO FUCKING TIRED OF YALL TREATING SAM WILSON LIKE HE IS THE AVENGERS’ HOUSE NEGRO WHO SOLVES ALL OF THEIR PROBLEMS AND DOES THEIR SHIT FOR THEM!!!!! 

i’m so tired oF Y’ALL TREATING NICK FURY LIKE HE’S JUST AN ANGRY BLACK MAN WHO SAYS ANY VARIATION OF “FUCK” EVERY TWO SECONDS AND BABYSITS THE AVENGERS!!!!

 I’M SO TIRED OF Y’ALL JUMPING ON JOSS WHEDON FOR NOT TREATING YOUR WHITE FAVES RIGHT BUT THEN TURNING AROUND AND TURNING THE CHARACTERS OF COLOR INTO SOME WATERED-DOWN PUNCHLINE!!!!

 I’M SICK OF IT!!!!

LIKE FUCK Y’ALL, Y’ALL ARE ALL TWO-FACED AS FUCK AND NASTY

constellationveins asked:

hey alex, i keep feeling like a shitty artist everytime i look at good art like yours or alicexz or marydoodles or laialopez and so i stop doing art but then everytime i see your guys' art i'm motivated to do art but it just never comes out right. any advice?

Hi There!

I am flattered to hear you hold my work in such high regard and I’m sorry to hear you are feeling like this. I think I can safely say non of the fantastic artists you have listed would ever want anyone to feel down about their own work after looking at the posts we make, personally I always hopped my sketch pages make people want to draw more rather than less.

What you are feeling is totally normal, this feeling of things just not coming out ‘right’ is actually something I struggle with daily in various different forms. Unfortunately it comes with the territory when creating things for a living, hobby or for any other reason, especially if you actually care about what you are doing.

As far as advice goes, unfortunately it is the sort of thing you have to find your own coping mechanism for. For example, the big reason I fill so many sketch book pages and spend way too much time re-drafting all of my work before attempting to paint is mainly out of insecurity and the fear that if I stop pushing forward and working becoming a better Illustrator even for a second I will never be as good as those that inspire me. 

My thinking is if I sketch 100 crappy drawings, maybe 1 will be worth using, rather than trying to nail an image in one take. It’s not a perfect solution, but once I get going I tend to stop worrying about whether or not I’m good enough and start focusing on the work it’s self.

It’s difficult to shake once you get this idea of others work being superior in your head, but the truth is you don’t need to worry about a specific level of quality that others have and you don’t think you posses. It is an illusion. All you need to do is accept inspiration wherever your brain finds it, and keep on working on your own goals. Stick at it and every few months look back at your own work and you will see improvement.

Sorry, that was a bit of a rant. This is a subject that is quite close to my heart. The short answer to your question is that everything you are feeling, every artist goes through at some point. The only solution that I know of is to keep drawing and you will get through it!

I really hope that helps! I know you can do it!

All the best,

-Alex 


p.s Hey guys, I get a lot of questions of this sort so every once in a while I like to do a public reply to see if I can be of some help to anyone else going through the same thing.

If anyone knows how to tag:  alicexz, marydoodles and laialopez into this, please do just in case they want to drop the OP a line in regards to her issue.

Sorry for the long text post, more art next week! Hope everyone has had a great weekend!

Okay but imagine Sam and Steve agreeing to let Pietro jog with them.

Sam: *Just jogging at his normal pace*

Steve: *Being polite and keeping pace with Sam*

Pietro: *Laps them* On *Laps them* Your *Laps them* Left!

Steve: *SIIIGH* Did you have to tell him to say that?

Sam: Yep!  How’s it feel, Cap?

Steve: Kinda like this!  *Speeds up*

Sam: *Lapped by Pietro then by Steve*  Oh, Come on!