tomb of philip ii

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Ancient leaf wreaths

1. Ancient Macedonian golden leaf wreath

2/3. Blossoming myrtle wreath, 350-300 BCE, Greece

4. Golden wreath diadem from the tomb of a woman, possibly a wife of Phillip II of Macedon, excavated in Vergina, Imathia, central Macedonia

5. Laurel leaf diadem from Anatolia

6. Golden Oak Crown, 4th c. BCE, Archaeological Museum of Thessalonika

7. Crown from the tomb of Philip II of Macedon and the Scythian princess Meda in Aigai, Macedonia. Crown of Meda.

8. Headdress of Queen Puabi of Ur, Mesopotamia, 2550 BC

9. Golden wreath of a Thracian aristocrat (circa 4th century BC) from Golyamata Mogila (Bulgaria)

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Greek Gold ‘Pontic Aristocratic’ Diadem, Late 4th-Late 3rd Century BC

A gold diadem consisting of a twisted rope border with a series of heart shaped scrolls with applied acanthus leaves and flowers with gold wire detail and tear drop shaped settings with blue enamel, flowers recessed for red enamel inlay; central wire motif in the form of a Hercules knot with applied flowers and acanthus leaves with tear drop shaped setting with blue enamel; in the center an amethyst cameo with the bust of a woman wearing a diadem and robes held at the shoulder by a brooch; one small flower element present but detached.

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‘The Abduction of Persephone’ wall painting, in the royal Tomb of Persephone,  Vergina, Greece.

One of the most significantly surviving frescoes from the 4th century BC, found in one of the royal Verginian tombs of Philip II, The Tomb of Persephone. To consider its importance we can analyse its important contribution to the Greek myth, Greek art, and death of one of the most influential Greek rulers in history, whilst comparing its similarity to Ovid’s poem.

Lancea Longini #2

Summary: Modern-day AU where Steve is a college professor whose specialty is WWII. You work for Stark Industries and after leading an excavation of Hitler’s secret bunker, you find an object that was thought to be a legend.
Characters: Steve Rogers, Bucky Barnes, & Female Reader
Word Count: 1,333
Warnings: Suspense and language, I guess. 
Author’s Note: If a tag is crossed out, it’s only because Tumblr is dumb and won’t let me tag you. GIF credit [x] [x] [x]
Miss the beginning? 

Your voice was raspy from the burn of whiskey, “What do you know about the Holy Lance?”

With one eyebrow arched, Steve stared at you, scoffing when you asked the question again. “You’re serious.”

“As a damn heart attack, Professor.”

He scoffed again and pushed away from his desk. “Only one problem with that, Miss Y/L/N, the Holy Lance, or Spear of Destiny as most know it as, doesn’t exist. It’s pure mythology. Even the Catholic Church has not made a claim to the authenticity of the ones in Rome and Vienna.”

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RICHARD MILES ARCHAEOLOGIST - WINTER BREAK

Golden larnax from the Royal Tombs of Aigai (with the sixteen-rayed sun design, the Vergina Sun, depicted on its lid). It contained the cremated remains of an adult male. It was found in a tomb thought to have belonged to King Philip II of Macedonia (3rd century BC).

Vergina Museum, Vergina, Macedonia, Greece

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Museums of Greece / Ancient Macedonian Painting:

Preview: Despite the fact that painting was one of the most advanced arts in Ancient Greece, only a few, but important, examples survive today. The great majority of it has been found on funerary buildings, on grave stelai, cist graves and burial couches in the region of hellenic Macedonia, with an overwhelming amount concentrated at the necropolis of Aigai, in contemporary Vergina, Imathia.They give us a small but well articulated image of the colour palette, the conventions and capabilities of ancient greek painting.

Pictured above:

Wall paintings- encaustic on marble- from the necropolis of Aigai and the tombs of Philip II of Macedon and Meda, Nikesipolis, and Alexander IV. Photography: Socrates Mavrommates, from the book Aigai: The royal metropolis of the Macedonians, by Angeliki Kottaridi.

Third row: Decorative motifs with ribbons and flowers from a cist grave found in Sedes. The grave today is housed in the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki. (photography mine)

(4th-3rd century B.C)

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Attic Greek Gold Leaf Diadem, C. 450 BC

This extremely rare and elegant Dionysian diadem is probably a royal tomb find. This Diadem portrays at least ten figures, including two men on horseback, plus numerous animals. This is a Hunting Scene, very much like the one found in association with the Tomb of Philip II of Macedon, involving his son, Alexander the Great.

The central figure on the diadem is the cross-legged god, Pan, with horns and goat-like hairy legs, sitting on a throne, playing the pipes. On either side of him is a standing god holding a scepter. Flanking the gods, on each side, is the hunting scene, each involving winged cupids and satyrs, one on horseback, plus three gazelles. There is a dog and a game bird on the right side and a boar on the left side. The upper third of the diadem features two dolphins and several  fish swimming over rolling waves. In the upper center of the diadem is a trio of hanging game animals.

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Hellenistic Gold Oak Wreath, c. 4th-3rd Century BC

A Greek Hellenistic diadem wreath comprising numerous projecting sprays of sheet-gold oak leaves in two sizes with serrated edges and veins, a large central rosette with two smaller similar roundels flanking, laurel leaves to the rear with gold Heracles knot, the four intersections covered by miniature gold masks modeled in the round with varying expressions, and four more to the bands of the knot; each element affixed to a custom-designed display stand.

The most famous of such wreaths is the example from Vergina, (MacedoniaGreece) in the tomb of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. Similar wreaths have been found all over the Hellenistic world in funerary contexts, as far apart as Asia Minor, the Black Sea coasts and Magna Graecia. The Greek writer Demosthenes (384-322 BC) noted that gold wreaths were worn for religious ceremonies, and the inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries record that they were left as dedications by local men and women, foreign visitors, officials approaching the end of their career, as well as foreign powers seeking a favorable relationship. The oak leaves may symbolize the power of Zeus, who was often represented by the oak tree. This is a finely detailed example of the type executed with great skill.

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Ancient Worlds - BBC Two 

Episode 4 “Return of the King”

The Royal Tombs of Aigai, the ancient first capital of the Kingdom of Macedonia, near Vergina.

Tomb II, “Tomb of Philip“ the tomb thought to have belonged to King Philip II of Macedonia contained a wealth of exquisite valuables and weapons including a gold wreath and a gold gorytos (quiver-and-bow-case) The relief decoration is a narrative of warriors fighting, as a female figure runs away in fright. The specific battle is the capture of a city.

Fourteen ivory portrait heads were also found in the main chamber; one of them was identified as Philip II.

PART II

Vergina, Macedonia, Greece

Hellenistic Greek Gold Oak Wreath, 4th-3rd Century BC

A diadem wreath comprising projecting sprays of sheet-gold oak leaves with serrated edges and veins, a large central rosette to the center

The most famous of such wreaths is the example from Vergina in the tomb of Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great. Similar wreaths have been found all over the Hellenistic world in funerary contexts, as far apart as Asia Minor, the Black Sea coasts and Magna Graecia. The Greek writer Demosthenes (384-322 BC) noted that gold wreaths were worn for religious ceremonies, and the inventories of Greek temples and sanctuaries record that they were left as dedications by local men and women, foreign visitors, officials approaching the end of their career, as well as foreign powers seeking a favorable relationship. The oak leaves may symbolize the power of Zeus, who was often represented by the oak tree. This is a finely detailed example of the type executed with great skill.

Another similar example

The Many Triumphs of Simonides

Anthologia Palatina 6.213 (attributed to Simonides, but probably late Hellenistic in date)

 Fifty-six bulls and tripods you won,
Simonides, before you set up this plaque.
Fifty-six times, too, you trained your own chorus-
A lovely chorus of men – and mounted
The splendid chariot of well-famed Nike.

 Ἓξ ἐπὶ πεντήκοντα, Σιμωνίδη, ἤραο ταύρους
    καὶ τρίποδας, πρὶν τόνδ’ ἀνθέμεναι πίνακα.
τοσσάκι δ’ ἱμερόεντα διδαξάμενος χορὸν ἀνδρῶν
    εὐδόξου Νίκας ἀγλαὸν ἅρμ’ ἐπέβης.

Fresco of a war-chariot from a Macedonian royal tomb at Vergina, possibly that of Philip II.