to-the-arctic-interview

2

Alex: I kinda judge how good a gig is these days by how far I can slide on me knees. We played a show in Las Vegas on this tour, and the surface was just unbelievable. I mean I went, about, thirteen feet. Yeah. It were, like, a long way. Really good slide. I mean, I could’ve gone off the end of the bloody stage.

Matt: With a guitar in your hand.

Alex: What can I say? I’m fearless.

                    - Arctic Monkeys Interview on The Jo Whiley Show, 2011

5

The FICTIONAL interview with Alex for HUMBUG MAGAZINE – milex model AU.

This is not intended to be taken seriously! All quotes and everything else is 100% made up. I only threw this together for the sake of AU purposes. Think of this as a mini fanfic, but in magazine form. Nice.

(Please do not repost or anything of that sort!! I worked kinda hard to do this so. Yeah. Please.)

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Photo by Zackery Michael

The Last Shadow Puppets recently announced Everything You’ve Come to Expect, their follow-up to 2008’s debut The Age of the Understatement. (It’s out April 1 via Domino). Today, Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner and collaborator Miles Kane have announced that they’ll be taking the record on the road. Find a full itinerary below.

Read our interview with Arctic Monkeys

The Last Shadow Puppets:

03-26 Edinburgh, Scotland - Usher Hall
03-29 Paris, France - Olympia
04-01 London, England - Hackney Empire
04-02 Liverpool, England - Olympia
04-03 Sheffield, England - City Hall
04-07 Amsterdam, Netherlands - Paradiso
04-11 New York, NY - Webster Hall
04-15 Indio, CA - Coachella
04-17 San Francisco, CA - The Fillmore
04-20 Los Angeles, CA - The Theatre at Ace Hotel
04-22 Indio, CA - Coachella
06-03 Barcelona, Spain - Primavera Festival
07-03 Werchter, Belgium - Rock Werchter Festival

Watch the band’s clip for “Bad Habits:" 

Watch Arctic Monkeys on an episode of Pitchfork.tv’s "Over/Under”:

—  The Last Shadow Puppets Announce Tour http://ift.tt/1RJ6rUT
BBC 6 Music- Arctic Monkeys WPSIAM archive interviews

You’ve probably heard these but thought some people might be interested in this, since the first album is 10 years old on Saturday. Just a couple of interviews with Steve Lamacq on BBC 6 Music from 2005/early 2006. Skip to about 2 hours into the programme to hear them. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b06vp9pt

A Photographer Who Tracked Displacement, from Soviet Gulags to Ethiopia’s Civil War
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Unidentified photographer, “Ruth Gruber, Alaska” (1941–43) (all images courtesy International Center of Photography unless indicated otherwise)

Ruth Gruber was the youngest PhD graduate in the world, earning her degree at the age of 20 with a doctoral thesis on Virginia Woolf (the first academic work on the author), when she trudged out into the Arctic and became the first journalist to interview prisoners at a Soviet Gulag in 1935. Born in 1911 in Brooklyn to Russian Jewish immigrants, she was a long way from home, but it was just the beginning of an international journey that would take her from remote corners of pre-statehood Alaska to the harrowing postwar internment camps of Europe. Now 104 years old, she’s had one of the most intrepid photography careers of the 20th century, and that legacy is being celebrated in Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist at Brooklyn College Library.

The exhibition, installed humbly with small prints and cases of ephemera alongside computer stations at the Flatbush college, is a traveling show from the International Center of Photography (ICP), which honored her with the Cornell Capa Award at the 2011 ICP Infinity Awards. After it closes on February 15, Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist will open March 13 at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education in Portland. It’s a chronological retrospective of her career, curated by Maya Benton with material from Gruber’s personal archive, featuring previously unseen prints. These include color photographs from the Alaskan Territory, where she traveled from 1941 to 1943 as an official US Field Representative. She was tasked with documenting the resources of the territory, and its conditions of life, for material to show the US public when Alaska became the 49th state in 1959. She also trained her eye on the territory’s indigenous culture, particularly the daily lives of the women, such as a Yupik mother with delicate tattoos on her face and hands holding a baby on her shoulders, and two young girls waiting on a US Indian Service bus, their Western clothing contrasting sharply with their elder’s wardrobes.

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Ruth Gruber, “Woman with tattooed face and hands, a form of body ornamentation among the Yupik peoples of St. Lawrence Island, Alaska Territory” (1941–43) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Installation view of ‘Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist’ at Brooklyn College Library, with a photograph of three women in a Sitka, Alaska, jail (1941–43) (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

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Ruth Gruber, “Students waiting on a US Indian Service school bus, Ward Cove, Alaska Territory” (1941–43) (© Ruth Gruber)

With the war in Europe, Gruber’s focus would shift to the plight of conflict refugees, spurred by her role in stewarding the Henry Gibbons ship on a covert 1944 mission to transport 1,000 Jewish refugees to the US from Europe. As she later stated, “[l]istening to their stories of survival, I had an epiphany. I realized that for the rest of my life I would use my tools — my words and images — to fight injustice.”

Postwar, she continued to photograph images others overlooked, such as the August 1947 voyage of the Runnymeade Park, one of the ships that Jewish refugees, most of them Holocaust survivors, were transferred into following the attempt of the SS Exodus to sail to British-controlled Palestine. There she took some of her most famous photographs of the overcrowding in the miserable heat, and the deplorable sanitary conditions. As she later wrote: “‘Take pictures!’ the people cry out. ‘Take pictures. Show our floating Auschwitz to the world.’ I take pictures blindly.” Soon the images were circulating through the New York Herald Tribune office.

In the decades seven decades since World War II, she kept traveling across continents, photographing migrants and refugees in Ethiopia, Yemen, Iraq, Romania, Morocco, Tunisia, and wherever people were displaced and ignored. In a 1947 image of a Cyprus Interment Camp, a father gently rests his baby in a cradle carefully made from scavenged rags and wood; in a 1985 image Ethiopian Jews quietly wait, rifles at the ready due to the threat of civil war attacks. Gruber was self-taught, but her photographs reveal a sensitive eye to the plight of marginalized people around the world, finding the humanity in even the most harrowing moments.

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Ruth Gruber, “A proud father putting his baby to sleep in a bassinet he constructed from gathered rags and pieces of wood, Cyprus Internment Camp” (1947) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Installation view of ‘Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist’ at Brooklyn College Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

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Installation view of ‘Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist’ at Brooklyn College Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

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Ruth Gruber, “Ethiopian Jews, seeking refuge in the synagogue, were given rifles to protect the village from guerrillas and bandits during the civil war, Ambober, Ethiopia” (1985) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Installation view of ‘Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist’ at Brooklyn College Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

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Ruth Gruber, “Eskimo boy standing next to fish drying on racks in the sunshine, Bethel, Alaska Territory” (1941–43) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Installation view of ‘Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist’ at Brooklyn College Library (photo by the author for Hyperallergic)

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Ruth Gruber, “Eklutna woman reading Life Magazine, Hooper Bay, Alaska” (1941–43) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Ruth Gruber, “Refugee families await forced deportation and transfer to prison ships, including Runnymede Park, Haifa Port, Palestine” (July 18, 1947) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Ruth Gruber, “Native Yakuts celebrating Aviation Day, a national holiday, in the Park of Culture and Rest, which is decorated with airplanes, parachutes, and pictures of famed aviators and leaders, Yakutsk, capital of Yakutia Republic” (1935–36) (© Ruth Gruber)

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Ruth Gruber, “Romanian families reunite in Haifa Port, Israel. Many had not seen each other since the beginning of World War II” (1951) (© Ruth Gruber)

Ruth Gruber, Photojournalist continues through February 15 at Brooklyn College Library (2900 Bedford Avenue, Flatbush, Brooklyn). It then shows at the Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (1953 NW Kearney Street, Portland, Oregon) from March 13 to June 13. 

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from Hyperallergic http://ift.tt/1NUoKPm
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An interview with Sheila Watt-Cloutier

In the summer of 2015, I got to read Sheila Watt-Cloutier’s memoir, The Right to Be Cold, and to speak with her at her book signing in Yellowknife. Here’s our conversation, published in Up Here magazine’s July 2015 issue:

Sheila Watt-Cloutier’s new memoir, The Right To Be Cold, reads as a guide for the North’s up-and-coming environmental activists. It details everything from the pain of residential school to the power of negotiating a groundbreaking United Nations treaty—in which signatory nations agreed to eliminate the use of certain toxic industrial chemicals—which led to a co-nomination for a Nobel Prize along with Al Gore. We ask the pensive pioneer what it means to be a Northern leader.

›› What is the biggest challenge for the North’s emerging environmental leaders? When we think about the CO2 levels that are already out there, and how countries are so slow to react effectively, including our own, this generation has their work cut out for them. I think they’re up to the task, because they’re not mired in, “We’ve got to protect our economy.” They’re not going to silo economy and environment. It’s going to be a holistic approach.

Keep reading

The Last Shadow Puppets Announce Tour

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Photo by Zackery Michael

The Last Shadow Puppets recently announced Everything You’ve Come to Expect, their follow-up to 2008’s debut The Age of the Understatement. (It’s out April 1 via Domino). Today, Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner and collaborator Miles Kane have announced that they’ll be taking the record on the road. Find a full itinerary below.

Read our interview with Arctic Monkeys

The Last Shadow Puppets:

03-26 Edinburgh, Scotland - Usher Hall
03-29 Paris, France - Olympia
04-01 London, England - Hackney Empire
04-02 Liverpool, England - Olympia
04-03 Sheffield, England - City Hall
04-07 Amsterdam, Netherlands - Paradiso
04-11 New York, NY - Webster Hall
04-15 Indio, CA - Coachella
04-17 San Francisco, CA - The Fillmore
04-20 Los Angeles, CA - The Theatre at Ace Hotel
04-22 Indio, CA - Coachella
06-03 Barcelona, Spain - Primavera Festival
07-03 Werchter, Belgium - Rock Werchter Festival

Watch the band’s clip for “Bad Habits:" 

Watch Arctic Monkeys on an episode of Pitchfork.tv’s "Over/Under”:



from Latest News - Pitchfork http://ift.tt/1RJ6rUT
The Last Shadow Puppets Announce Tour

External image

Photo by Zackery Michael

The Last Shadow Puppets recently announced Everything You’ve Come to Expect, their follow-up to 2008’s debut The Age of the Understatement. (It’s out April 1 via Domino). Today, Arctic Monkeys frontman Alex Turner and collaborator Miles Kane have announced that they’ll be taking the record on the road. Find a full itinerary below.

Read our interview with Arctic Monkeys

The Last Shadow Puppets:

03-26 Edinburgh, Scotland - Usher Hall
03-29 Paris, France - Olympia
04-01 London, England - Hackney Empire
04-02 Liverpool, England - Olympia
04-03 Sheffield, England - City Hall
04-07 Amsterdam, Netherlands - Paradiso
04-11 New York, NY - Webster Hall
04-15 Indio, CA - Coachella
04-17 San Francisco, CA - The Fillmore
04-20 Los Angeles, CA - The Theatre at Ace Hotel
04-22 Indio, CA - Coachella
06-03 Barcelona, Spain - Primavera Festival
07-03 Werchter, Belgium - Rock Werchter Festival

Watch the band’s clip for “Bad Habits:" 

Watch Arctic Monkeys on an episode of Pitchfork.tv’s "Over/Under”:

The Last Shadow Puppets Announce New Album Everything You've Come to Expect

External image

Photo by Zackery Michael

The Last Shadow Puppets have announced a new album, Everything You’ve Come to Expect, the follow-up to their 2008 debut The Age of the Understatement. Arctic Monkeys singer Alex Turner and Miles Kane, who perform together as the band, have reunited with their regular producer, James Ford, and string arranger Owen Pallett. Mini Mansions’ Zachary Dawes joins them on bass. Check out the album art and tracklist below.

The album was recorded at Shangri La Studio in Malibu.

In early January, the band shared the video for “Bad Habits.” Revisit that below.

Read our interview with Arctic Monkeys from last year. 

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Everything You’ve Come to Expect:

1 Aviation
2 Miracle Aligner
3 Dracula Teeth
4 Everything  You’ve Come To Expect
5 The Element Of Surprise
6 Bad Habits
7 Sweet Dreams, TN
8 Used To Be My Girl
9 She Does The Woods
10 Pattern
11 The Dream Synopsis

Watch Arctic Monkeys on an episode of Pitchfork.tv’s “Over/Under”:



from Latest News - Pitchfork http://ift.tt/1Pjxbel
The Last Shadow Puppets Announce New Album Everything You've Come to Expect

External image

Photo by Zackery Michael

The Last Shadow Puppets have announced a new album, Everything You’ve Come to Expect, the follow-up to their 2008 debut The Age of the Understatement. Arctic Monkeys singer Alex Turner and Miles Kane, who perform together as the band, have reunited with their regular producer, James Ford, and string arranger Owen Pallett. Mini Mansions’ Zachary Dawes joins them on bass. Check out the album art below.

The album was recorded at Shangri La Studio in Malibu.

In early January, the band shared the video for “Bad Habits.” Revisit that below.

Read our interview with Arctic Monkeys from last year. 

External image

Watch Arctic Monkeys on an episode of Pitchfork.tv’s “Over/Under”: