to-catch-a-thief

For me, this was the perfect part after the intensity of The Country Girl and the discomforts of Green Fire, and how could I turn down the chance for another Hitchcock picture? I was flattered he wanted me. It was a comedy, but it was also romantic - and rather daring for its time, too, but always with the sophisticated Hitchcock touch. Francie is eager to be a thief - she’s out for kicks and thrills, and she thinks it’s exciting to join up with a man she believed to be an outlaw. She was all set to climb out over the rooftops with him!
—  Grace Kelly on her role in To Catch a Thief (High Society: The Life of Grace Kelly by Donald Spoto)
9

This chilly ensemble immediately removes all trace of inner warmth from Frances and then the rest of the film is spent gradually restoring it while infusing her character with a dry and quite naughty sense of humor.

During their first meeting, dashing Robie cuts through this glacier easily enough, even receiving an unexpected goodnight kiss. Yet Frances, and by proxy Grace Kelly, has now been established as the principal object of fascination for characters and audience. Prioritizing her as so central to the narrative (directly involving her with Robie), even hints that Frances could possibly be ‘The Cat’, an idea that is subtly reinforced by several costume choices further into the film. (x)

5

What is your favorite love scene?

“It was Cary Grant and Grace Kelly in To Catch a Theif. It’s the most beautiful shot of a woman I’ve ever seen in a movie. It’s when Cary and Grace come along to her room, she’s going in. And you don’t know whether she’s going to invite him in or,- you know. She doesn’t. But I’ve never seen any woman look so beautiful on screen as she did in like that one minute scene.”

“It was an incredible love scene because it was unrequited love. She kissed him and then went inside and shut the door. And he stood there looking confused as only Cary Grant can do.”

-Michael Caine