8

I put everything I had into it - all my feelings and everything I’d learned in 46 years of living, about family life and fathers and children. And my feelings about racial justice and inequality and opportunity. [Gregory Peck on his Oscar-winning role in To Kill a Mockingbird]

To Kill A Mockingbird (1962) Dir. Robert Mulligan

I have to know this

Does every bookworm’s addiction to books just magically disappear at some point?

And I mean hardcore bookworms, the ones who read so much that they’re sitting and downloading more PDFs to read even on the day before their Math exam even though they know they’ll probably fail, they’ve perfected the art of maneuvering through crowds without looking up from their book, the only way they know of to make friends is by finding other people who read what they read, the first thing people find out about them even before they know their name is the fact that they’re a bookworm, they read a 600 page novel in a day or two max no matter what else is going on in their life and then live and breathe it’s universe and characters before they move on to another novel, they often mispronounce words because most of their vocabulary is built through reading and not by talking, they’ve been called out by a teacher at least once in their life for reading a book under the desk (and they keep doing it except they become more careful and eventually become experts), they read so much that their entire personality is shaped more from the lessons they were taught by the characters in their favorite books than by actual people they’ve met in their life. 

Most of my friends and I were this exact kind of bookworm, and we suddenly aren’t anymore. 

We’re reading fanfiction (Ao3 is open on my computer right this minute), watching movies and relating like hell to quotes like “I just feel like there are so many things that I could be doing and probably want to be doing that I’m just not”, seeing amazing art and wanting to do more art of our own, watching movies that describe our whole lives on screen and wanting to make one or at least write a script of our own, reading a beautiful fanfiction and wanting to do at least something like that, wanting to cook, wanting to take photographs, reading books like To Kill A Mockingbird or Harry Potter and day-dreaming about starting a book of our own and create more characters like Scout and places like Hogwarts, reading comics and wanting to create comics, but we’re just not. We have book lists a mile long and we’re unable to read even the books we have, and the most ironic fact is that everyone who knows us believes we’re readers.

8

Happy 101st Birthday Eldred Gregory Peck!
April 5th, 1916 - June 12th, 2003

You have to dream, you have to have a vision, and you have to set a goal for yourself that might even scare you a little because sometimes that seems far beyond your reach. Then I think you have to develop a kind of resistance to rejection, and to the disappointments that are sure to come your way.

10

film meme {½} decades ☰ 1960s

Hundreds of full-length films were produced in the 1960s. Historical drama films continued to include epics. Psychological horror films extended beyond the typical monster horror into more twisted films. Comedy films became more elaborate, setting in more comedy-dramas and welcomed a new form of satire because of the success of Kubrick’s 1964 film Dr. Stangelove. Spy films welcomed more tech. And fantasy and sci-fi films were made with a more wider range of special effects.  Beginning in the middle of the decade due to the start of the cultural revolution and the abolition of the Hays Code, films became increasingly experimental and daring and were taking shape of what was to define the 1970s.

  • you: What the fuck why is this in court, he obviously didn't do shit and the white bitch a hoe with a crazy bitch ass father, y'all are just racist af, let the man go #BlackLivesMtter
  • Atticus, an intellectual: To begin with, this case should never have come to trial. The state has not produced one iota of medical evidence that the crime Tom Robinson is charged with ever took place... It has relied instead upon the testimony of two witnesses, whose evidence has not only been called into serious question on cross-examination, but has been flatly contradicted by the defendant. Now, there is circumstantial evidence to indicate that Mayella Ewel was beaten - savagely, by someone who led exclusively with his left. And Tom Robinson now sits before you having taken the oath with the only good hand he possesses... his RIGHT. I have nothing but pity in my heart for the chief witness for the State. She is the victim of cruel poverty and ignorance. But my pity does not extend so far as to her putting a man's life at stake, which she has done in an effort to get rid of her own guilt. Now I say "guilt," gentlemen, because it was guilt that motivated her. She's committed no crime - she has merely broken a rigid and time-honored code of our society, a code so severe that whoever breaks it is hounded from our midst as unfit to live with. She must destroy the evidence of her offense. But what was the evidence of her offense? Tom Robinson, a human being. She must put Tom Robinson away from her. Tom Robinson was to her a daily reminder of what she did. Now, what did she do? She tempted a Negro. She was white, and she tempted a Negro. She did something that, in our society, is unspeakable. She kissed a black man. Not an old uncle, but a strong, young Negro man. No code mattered to her before she broke it, but it came crashing down on her afterwards. The witnesses for the State, with the exception of the sheriff of Maycomb County have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to this court in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted, confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption... the evil assumption that all Negroes lie, all Negroes are basically immoral beings, all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women. An assumption that one associates with minds of their caliber, and which is, in itself, gentlemen, a lie, which I do not need to point out to you. And so, a quiet, humble, respectable Negro, who has had the unmitigated TEMERITY to feel sorry for a white woman, has had to put his word against TWO white people's! The defendant is not guilty - but somebody in this courtroom is. Now, gentlemen, in this country, our courts are the great levelers. In our courts, all men are created equal. I'm no idealist to believe firmly in the integrity of our courts and of our jury system - that's no ideal to me. That is a living, working reality! Now I am confident that you gentlemen will review, without passion, the evidence that you have heard, come to a decision and restore this man to his family. In the name of GOD, do your duty. In the name of God, believe... Tom Robinson.