titanium

instagram

It took me almost exactly a year to finish the city sticker set, I’m excited and bummed to see them go. I’ve got some brand spanking new folders designs in mind for the future; I’m not trying to look back, it’s time to move on to new challenges. I won’t make any more of this exact design, but I do like tantos, so who knows what’s in store. #endofanera #foldingknife #framelock #tanto #flipper #knifeporn #knife #knives #knifemaker #knifemaking #titanium #anodized #anodizing #metalarts #dailygrind #framelockfriday

Made with Instagram
instagram

Rutilated quartz sphere, polished

Supercaliomnilisticexpialiphobic

In the March issue of Materials World, we write about nanotube-covered titanium that could be used as blood-repellent medical implants. This can be used as clot-resistant surgical implants, described by Dr Arun Kota as ‘the Holy Grail of the medical device industry.’

I’m reminded of a previous demonstration of tuneable superomniphobic surfaces from Kota back in 2014. Again working with titanium, the coating is able to trap certain low surface tension liquids on a variable scale. Also, it looks kinda cool.

5 things you didn’t know about... space fabric

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech. A prototype of the 3D-printed space fabric.

1. NASA plans to use additive manufacturing to create woven metal fabrics for use in space.

2. Three prototypes have been made so far, in stainless steel, titanium and metal-coated nylon reinforced with carbon fibre.

3. Raul Polit-Casillas, Systems Engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, USA, and his colleagues have designed these space fabrics to be reflective, foldable and to have tensile strength and passive heat management, with one side of the fabric absorbing light and the other reflecting it.

4. The use of additive manufacturing reduces the costs of traditional manufacturing. The print time varies between a few hours and a couple of days depending on the material and printer used, according to Polit-Casillas.

5. In the distant future, the JPL team also wants to be able to manufacture fabrics in space and potentially recycle old materials, due to the limited availability
of resources. 

To find out more see page 3 of the upcoming June issue of Materials World.  

Newest dabber!!! ✨✨✨
Hanging river pearl with a turquoise bead because turquoise just looks so clean with gold.
Gold wire all around accented with spirals.
Definitely one of my favorites, super classy and the pearl dangled so nicely as well as the turquoise being the perfect place to put your thumb.
Let me know what you guys think!
-goon ♥️
@magicmanda
@daberellaaa
@gabyfaace
@stoner-ette
@weed-breath
@aliensdab