tips on drawing

okay so I’ve seen a lot of artists,including myself, make this common mistake of coloring the palm of  a hand(and the sole of a foot) as the same color as the person’s skin tone.

but in fact ,palms and soles are a different color compare to our skin

this is due to the lack of Melanin on them

hope this helps!

10

I made a thing! I was thinking about this for a few days - because I realized that when I was young, I was also frustrated about being given the same advice over and over - without really knowing what it meant!!

Here’s 5 techniques which I have done before which have helped me grow as an artist, which are good for 5-minute warmups or just straight up challenges for your sketchbook! 

Obviously, these are not the ONLY techniques - they’re just the ones I find most fun! And maybe they’re not the most ‘correct’ ones out there, but it’s better than another comic about practicing more, right? 

Good luck to everyone on their drawings!

8

Quick Tip: Don’t know how to draw an expression on certain angle? Grab yourself a mirror and depending on how you place it you can get the same expression in two different angles! (I think this might work with two mirrors so you get three angles at the same time but I guess that would require an extra hand)

quick proportion tips

- eyeballs are an eyeball width apart
- ears align with the top of your brows to the bottom of your nose, and are the center-point of a profile view
- lip corners line up to the center of each eye
- hands are roughly the size of your face
- feet are the same size as your forearm
- elbows are aligned with your belly-button
- your hands reach down mid-length of your thighs
- both upper and lower legs (individually) are roughly the same size as your torso 
(this is all rough estimates for proportion! feel free to add more to help others)

anonymous asked:

Hi! I love your art. In particular your edges are really sharp, but still lineless (if that makes sense?). If it's not too much to ask, would you be willing to share some tips for achieving those edges on digital? Thank you, and have a nice day! :)

Here’s a few tips^

Also, not included in the pic: Make sure you’re not working on a small canvas.  For instance, 1000x1000 pixels will probably result in some unintentionally soft edges, because you won’t be able to zoom in to refine the painting.  I usually use 4000x4000, for reference.

Why you’re not improving your art

Have you ever felt like your art is on the same level for a long time? Have you ever felt like you can’t grow your skills. Have you ever felt like everyone around you grows in rapid speed and you are just like a snail at the end of the race?

I was thinking about that and trying to pinpoint the reasons why you might feel that way. I figured out some solutions that helped me and some other artists I know.

1. Not looking for critique/feedback

‘You can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems.’

This is number one problem I see and many professional artists will tell you about that. You can’t be too shy to show your work to people who can give you good critique. Look for professionals who are willing to help you and use that. Critiquing is mistaken to be something hurtful for young artists BUT in reality people giving feedback are trying to help you grow. I know how hard it is to hear that you are still not good enough, that your art is lacking something. Maybe you know that yourself but you can’t yourself pinpoint things you need to focus on because your eye still isn’t trained enough to pinpoint exact problems. The best person to go to would be professional with trained eyes who is able to say by flipping through your portfolio what it lacks and what you can do to make it look better. Don’t be afraid and seek that help. Don’t be too attached to your own art and accept that it isn’t perfect and you need a fresh pair of eyes to look at it.

2.  Not implementing the feedback

'Implementing is the key step in the process of growing.’

After you have done first step from my list and you finally found a professional willing to give you feedback try to implement feedback. Don’t just listen to it, nod few times pretending you understand what it being said. Don’t defend your art and don’t give excuses if the critique is genuine. Implementing is the key step in the process of growing. There is no use in feedback without you actually trying out the tips you were given. The whole point of that is to change your work. You are not being better artists by collecting thoughts about your art. Now it is time to do the work. It actually requires to put time and effort . Usually what people do,after receiving feedback, is  they pat themselves on back like it was 'job well done’ and being lazy. They are not willing to actually put in the work to implement feedback. It is time consuming and you need to put a lot of effort. Although without that there is not any point in seeking feedback.

3. Not trying/not failing enough

'Embrace failures as a valuable lessons.’

Yes! There is lesson in failure! As hard as it is to understand. Once you collect experience you grow from it and become wiser. You know what path to choose to avoid next time failure. Successful people are the ones that can try something many times before they finally succeed. When they finally succeed it’s just a result of many attempts they have made before. No one is born ready for challenge. People are scared to lose because for our psyche it hurts more than a win feels good. People will try avoid at any cost losing so at some point they give up and stop trying. You can’t say for sure you will be successful artist after you did it for a year and don’t see result. You are not the one deciding how long it takes. It will be done some day. some day you will meet your artistic goals. But you will only meet them by trying and failing probably hundred times on a way. Just don’t be afraid. Those mistakes on a way are path that differentiate you and a professional. They already failed many times to get to where they are now. When you understand that you will embrace failures as a valuable lessons.

4. Doing things that are not  challenging you.

'Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching!’

Don’t settle in your comfort zone. You’ve heard that already many times right? That is why. You limit your skillset. Good things come out of comfort zone. If you feel like you have problems drawing something you are probably right. The reason is you don’t challenge yourself enough to draw things that are difficult for you. For example if you are only drawing a boy in front view standing with hands straight it doesn’t sound like the most exciting art right? But what if it’s the only thing you can draw and it looks somewhat decent? Well then, solution for that is easy - experiment with different angles, experiment with expressions, with composition, with different species. Be brave here and discover topics you don’t draw. You art will become more interesting and you will be more confident drawing. Personally I know that this is the hardest part for artists. It is hard to let go of what we know and discover unknown. We feel vulnerable and  like we can’t really draw. This feeling sucks. As much as this feeling sucks you know what else sucks? Sucks that your skills are stagnating. Feel uncomfortable and pick up this damn pencil and draw like no one else is watching! I guarantee that after some time you will be surprised with what you created and how your art have changed.

Good luck to everyone who is on path of improvement!

Tips for Illustrators (and other artists too!)

I’m an illustration major at MICA (please check out my blog here as a way to support me for making this post!), so this is catered towards what I learned in my illustration critiques and from professional illustrators. I think these tips can go for other artists too, though!

None of these are things that work all the time, but they’re general “rules” I’ve been taught. You can break them, just know why you’re doing so! These are just things I copied from my critique notes, so most are general tips I’ve heard and copied down.

General

  • Enjoy what you’re working on, but be okay with changing it.
  • Anatomy, and accurately trying to portray it, is really important.
  • Time and space can be portrayed through focus and distance.
  • When working digitally, make some of your own textures (traditionally) and scan them in. Adding them into a picture adds an element of your own hand and makes your work stand apart from other digital work.
  • Contrast is a great thing.
  • Saturation is a great thing, especially in watercolor (soak that brush with pigment!).
  • Your style should never draw an obscene amount of attention to itself; it should just work fluidly.
  • Consider what medium(s) work best for your idea.
  • Cover your paint palettes (particularly reusable ones) to make sure dust doesn’t get in the paints.
  • Spin the page when you’re working. The time is takes to do that will show some major improvement in your art!
  • Use dark watercolor and then a light colored pencil on top, never the other way around (it will look muddy and ruin clarity).
  • Make sure to sometime pin or place you piece far away and step away so you can see the whole composition (or zoom out a lot digitally).
  • Consider the genre and audience of what you’re working for (and if it’s yourself, then you’re your own audience!).
  • Illustration is a branch of fine art, don’t forget that.
  • Fantasy art usually needs a lot of high detail.

Coloring

  • Pick an overall color palette to work in, then add in other colors as needed.
  • Complementary colors (ones opposite on the color wheel), when placed next to each other, can pop an object forward or draw attention to it. (Think of a red ornament on a green Christmas tree).
  • Designate the shadows to be either warm or cool, and the highlights to be the opposite. Stay with this throughout the entire picture.
  • All colors have a warm and a cool hue (cool and warm blues, cool and warm oranges).
  • The more saturated a color is, the more it will pop forward in the picture plane.
  • Don’t use colors right out of the paint tube.
  • When making a shadow, tint the color with the complementary tone (it makes it a little more grey).
  • Colorizing backgrounds lines makes them recede in a colored image with line art.
  • Blue and pink tones are great for use in skin tones.
  • Flats need to be fairly differentiated colors.

Drawing

  • The reference should never be an excuse for a misleading or awkward pose. You have the artistic license to alter an awkward pose and not just draw from a photo.
  • With scratchy or textured line art, find some places of solid black too, to allow the eye to rest (or where you want something to pop out).
  • How you render all the elements of the picture is what makes your own individual style.
  • When something is illuminated, it should be the brightest part of the composition.
  • Anything with a straight angle (like the corner of a room) has one wall/side being lighter in value than the other. There is a crisp distinction.
  • Sometimes adding more lessens the strength of the image.
  • Fabric folds are crisp, if they’re too soft they’ll look like clay.
  • Line heaviness and weight can determine depth.

Anatomy/Characters

  • Anatomical consistency is very important.
  • Inside of the mouth is usually dark.
  • Show character motivations with actions and poses.
  • You can crop a face or figure to set a mood.
  • In any and every picture, pay special and close attention to the hands, feet, and face.
  • Learning musculature, even if you use reference, will help you create the body you want for your character. Understand the human form…it’s easier to alter if you understand it in the first place.
  • To pop a figure forward, add a little bit of rim lighting (great with backlighting).

Composition

  • Avoid spots where a line or shape comes really close, but doesn’t cross, the edge of the paper. This is called a tangent and tangents are bad (they suck the eye into just that one spot and stop the composition).
  • Nothing in the picture is accidentally there, it is all drawn by you, so make sure everything has a conscious placement.
  • Don’t crop anything that shows essential character expression (including essential parts of the pose).
  • Never crop a figure at a joint (it makes the limb look amputated unintentionally).
  • Consider how you show detail with smaller characters…what are the essential characteristics?
  • Shapes of color or tone can make great framing devices.
  • For the most part, render the foreground with more clarity than the background…you want atmospheric perspective to be used to make it look like it’s receding.
  • Line heaviness/weight can combat (in a good way) any very dark areas.
  • When the character breaks a border (shape, line, panel etc), it shows dominance.
  • Make the shape of your negative space visually interesting.
  • “Cornerstops” are great. They are a compositional element that visually blocks your eye from running off the corner of a page.
  • Shadows can be a great compositional element.

Narrative Illustration (Portraying the narrative)

  • It is a successful illustration if the story is told.
  • Use every element of the image to tell the story.
  • Sometimes you have to take out elements you love for the sake of storytelling.
  • Think of images as being fast/slow, quiet/loud. What techniques portray these senses for you, and why are you using such techniques? What areas of the picture are slower and faster, why those areas?
  • Indicate how lavish or simple a place is by the details you choose to include in the background.
  • Don’t make it obvious that you “curated” the picture; it should look natural.
  • Cover illustrations don’t always need big and bold text, as long as there’s a strong narrative being portrayed.
  • Something mid action carries the narrative better than pre or post action.
  • You should be able to tell a story without relying on text.

Sequential Art (Comics, etc)

  • Color between panels can draw the eye around the page.
  • Big jumps in narrative can add humor and excitement, just make sure to think of why you are having the jump there.
  • When starting a sequence, make it obvious where you start (establishing shot; biggest to smallest, etc).
  • Make sure panels can read as separate images even if you took the gutter away.
  • Smaller panels are frequently used for faster/quicker actions.
  • Removing the background in certain panels allows the scene to be read faster; you only need one background per page (unless the scene in the background is changing).
  • Style, readability, and timing are key things to keep in mind.
  • Does the punch line/climax happen at the right time on the page?
  • Before planning a page, ask yourself: “How much time is elapsing between the first and last panel?”
  • Consider panel shape and size.
  • The composition, and where the eye flows inside every panel, informs where the eye travels to next…compositionally lead the eye from panel to panel.
  • The more panels you have, generally the more time goes on.
  • Don’t rely on speed/action lines to make things dramatic.
  • Give word bubbles a little breathing room.
  • When doing a graphic novel, you’ll usually have to redraw the first few pages since the characters will come more naturally to you by the end pages.
  • There is a design element to sound effects.

Digital Art (Mostly Photoshop based, but some are general tips)

  • Before printing, you usually want to switch your file to CMYK (though save a file in RGB too). Print at 300 dpi.
  • Before printing, you can up the brightness, saturation and contrast until it just starts to look awkward. You’ll learn the best settings for the printer you print at.
  • Don’t place digital textures anywhere. Consciously arrange them.
  • Don’t overrender. Digital art tends to be the most successful when it feels less digital than someone would expect.
  • If your color scheme doesn’t look cohesive, you can use a fill layer of one specific color to unify everything (Layer->fill layer). Lower the opacity to around 15-30%.

this got like 4 times longer than I anticipated, I’m really sorry orz It’s basic beginning stuff I guess, stuff that you must have seen everywhere already but I can’t begin to tell you how important it is, at least to me, to know what the hell that mass you’re drawing is. Even if I’m not the best at it (and even if I could use some anatomy studying lately coughcough), it’s something I’m PASSIONATE about and something I consider you have to do, to learn and absorb in order to draw people and be happy with it. Because in my case, once I kinda sorta got the hang of drawing bodies, I felt my hand free, relaxed. I felt happy as hell with what I started being able to draw and I enjoyed drawing bodies 210%

anonymous asked:

Sorry, if you've answered this before, but do you have any tips on drawing mouths and lips?

Hello anon! :D I’m not the best at making tutorials and giving tips but I’ll do my best to answer your question! ^^

I sure do love drawing lips! It might be in fact my favourite part of the face to draw. 

Let’s see what makes them so irresistible ;)

tip 1: let them shine! that tiny shiny spot does wonders for the lips - it makes them fuller, softer and more three dimensional. It also makes the lips look slightly wet. Sexy!

tip 2: Build the depth with some darker spots. Quirking corners are great for that, and if you make the darkest spot in the middle of the mouth it seems like it’s about to part. And maybe whisper something seductive ;)

tip 3: The very middle of upper lip is my favourite area, it gives the mouth its distinct character. It’s also a great spot to play with shadows, one lighter stroke, one darker stroke and you have a very dramatic shading going on! 

tip 4: When drawing lineart it’s good to keep the line varying in width and pressure. Equally thin, flat line might look good in anime, but even there it’s rarely the case. Making the line thicker in the shadowy part of the mouth adds depth to your drawing. 

General remarks:

I almost never outline the upper lip, it tends to look weird. Just a thin “U” shape in the middle is usually enough.

Upper lip is usually in the shadow, at least half of it. Lower lip tends to catch the light, especially with pouty plump lips. The more shadow you add under it, the fuller the lips look. 

When drawing male characters I usually play around with skin tones instead of pink and red (see the third row of examples). But it’s not a rule. Some boys rock them rosy lips. ;)

Never paint the teeth white, never. Gray, yellowish and pinkish tones are great. 

And the final tip: use reference! Look for pictures of people with beautiful lips, with thin lips and full lips, try to see which line goes where and how it changes the shape and expression. I hardly ever draw without a reference.

Good luck!  👄

2

LA summertime. Sketchbook doodles that i colored for fun plus a background photo i took at some point.

This is the girl from my next book, which I’m still working on, but I’m quiet on it because it’s taking me forever and it’s embarrassing to talk about. Anyway the first pic is more in character and the second pic is just like a fashion type drawing. Also, her head in the second pic was scribbled on a post-it with a different pen because i messed it up originally. But you don’t really notice the sketchiness when there’s color on it. pro tip