tip east

ORGANISATION TIPS FOR FRESHERS: THE BARE MINIMUM SO YOU CAN STRESS LESS p1/4

WHAT TO HAVE:

1. A SAFE PLACE – keep all irreplaceable/important documents like your birth certificate, a level certificates, UCAS letters in here. Ideally a concertina folder, or a folder with different sections. Mine is organised by bank stuff, ID, student finance, qualifications, tenancy, and my part time job. Keep this folder in your room and ideally keep a list of what is inside taped to the front.

2. NOTEBOOK – for lecture notes, shopping lists, any notes. At lectures, write the week number, date, module title, etc at the top. If anything requires action (e.g. you have to email someone, read something for next week) circle it, highlight it, underline it, make it clear. When you go home you can make a list of what needs to be done and when. Keep this with you at uni, and when you get home always leave it in the same place in your bag/on your desk. 

3. BINDER – with plastic wallets, dividers if you want. I keep two sections: ‘to do’ and ‘to return’. When a teacher hands me homework or a bit of paper I immediately put it in ‘to do’. When I get home I check ‘to do’ and make a list, decide when to do it. When I’ve done it I immediately put it in ‘to return’. Keep this with you at uni and when you get home always leave it in the same place

4. SEMESTER PLANNER – week numbers going down, mon/tues/wed/thurs/fri/sat/sun going across. Write down deadlines, birthdays, holidays so you can see everything in one place. You might notice two deadlines in the same week. Keep on your wall.

5. WEEKLY PLANNER – print off one for each week, hours of the day going down, days of the week going across. Fill in your classes, society events, etc. Write your goal for that week (e.g. a deadline, or to begin an essay). Keep this in your notebook/binder so if you need to organise a tutorial or to meet a friend, you can quickly check when you are free.

6. FORGET PLACE – this is where I put things I can forget about. Put in stuff you look at occasionally like recipes, or old photos, or internship info you don’t want to think about right now. When I write down a list of all my assessments, I stuff it in the forget place and stop worrying. Keep this stuff in a plastic wallet/folder in your room.

the-east-hunter  asked:

do you have advice for writing a story? Like how to break it down to make it easier to write or anything?

I’ve never really wrote a novel, but I’ve wrote a bunch of short stories and stuck them together. I can share a few of my writing habits though :)

1. Write the scene you want to right now. 

If you write the scene you really want to write, you can decide whether you want to write the rest of the story or not. Sometimes I’ll get a cool idea for an AU, but it’s really one scene in particular I’ll want to write. Once I write it, I either lose interest or realize I want to keep going. 

That’s how the Supernatural AU started. I wrote part 4, 5, and 6 before anything else, because those were the stories I really wanted to tell (and it’s the ones you can tell I put the most love into). After I finished part 6, I realized I wanted to keep going, so I wrote the first 3 parts before it and continued. 

It’s also a really good way to foreshadow events. If you go back and reread the story, you might catch some Easter eggs :)

2. Pick a time to write and stick with it.

If you set a certain time up to write, your brain will automatically go “Oh hey, it’s time to word right now.” I mean, it’s okay to write when you feel like it, but make sure you always open that word document every day at the same time, even if you don’t want to write at that point. 

This time is different for everyone. I write my best in the morning right after I wake up. It’s easier for me to think, and I’m not tired from the day. Meanwhile, my sister can only write at night, because that’s when she’s most awake. 

If you can turn writing into a habit, your body won’t fight writer’s block as hard.

3. Make a checklist of things you want to happen.

Once you’ve decided to move forward, write out a bunch of events you want to happen in your story. They can be little reminders and goals to help you complete your story. 

When I write, it’s empowering to know I can check another item off my checklist. It makes me feel like I’m making progress, and it helps distract me from the finished product, which is a problem when I create. I’m so focused on the finished product I forget about the journey. 

4. Edgy cliffhangers are nice, but make sure you give your reader a spot to rest.

Really, cliffhangers should be used in balance. Yes, it’s amazing to have your reader at the edge of their seat through your whole story, but beware of the cliffhanger trap. If a story keeps having too many life or death cliffhangers, I usually give up on it, because I’m afraid the author will quit and leave me wondering what happened for years. Plus it can leave the reader frustrated that they were promised a good story but constantly leave it unresolved.

Soft cliffhangers are also nice. What I mean when I say “soft cliffhangers” is put just enough in for your reader to want to continue, but don’t make them kill to go to the next part. Put in a mystery about a character, promise a new partnership forming on the horizon, have a character convincing themselves to be strong after a tragedy. 

My favorite soft cliffhanger from the Supernatural AU was part 7, where Jack accepts Anti is a part of him now. However, the last line promises Anti will be back to help later. It’s nothing dramatic, but it makes the reader question just what Anti has up his sleeve for later.

5. Write first, edit later.

Pour your heart and soul out into a page without fear of ramifications. That’s what first drafts are for. Save the editing bit for after you finish the chapter.

What I’ll do to stop me from editing the chapter before times up is: I’ll write a short summary of what happened in the last 5 paragraphs. It gives me enough momentum to keep going without having to reread what I just wrote.

I mean, sure, something could happen twice or not feel right after you write it, but that’s easily edited once the chapter is over :)

-

I hope that at least helps you a little bit. Happy writing!

-Cat

Pay that bill (get me what I need) money spell

REPOSTING FOR NEW BLOG. For those wondering, yes this is my spell. I just restarted my blog to get rid of other nonsense and get back to teh witchness…


This requires just 4 things, for the truly broke, like me. All these are easy to obtain and equally as easy to perform. The candle can be made optional if you cannot use them in your situation. You can also use those fake plastic ones if that’s what floats your boat…. You can also feel free to modify this if need be.

NOTE: This spell is only to get you what you NEED. Don’t go expecting to win the lottery here, mkay?

You need:

  • 3 coins of the currency you regularly use, all of different value
  • A bill that needs to be paid / or the amount you need written on a piece of paper
  • FOCUS (Yes, this is a thing you need)
  • Tea light Candle (optional based on circumstances)

Keep reading

ORGANISATION TIPS FOR FRESHERS: THE BARE MINIMUM SO YOU CAN STRESS LESS p4/4

NOTE-TAKING AND REVISION TIPS

  • use bullet points
  • highlight stuff - doesn’t even matter what you highlight! it breaks down information for your eyes
  • record yourself explaining a topic onto your laptop/phone. when you put yourself on the spot you may uncover gaps in your knowledge.
  • play it back to yourself and feel proud! you know loads
  • when you write stuff down, write stuff in really big letters if you want to. write in all caps if you want. write exclusively in gold sharpie. if you don’t want to revise a boring topic, but you have to, you can write swear words in your gosh-darn notes. no-one will ever know.
  • if you have loads of revision stuff on scrap paper, highlight the edges of the paper/do a border so these are clearly revision. you can colour code it and sort a pile of messy papers quickly.
  • oral exams scare the living crap out of me, so i found a picture of my examiner on the uni website and practiced in front of it (told my classmates and they laughed in my face, but hey i got a 1st and i’m no longer scared)
  • do past papers - there will be some on your uni website
  • flashcards. everyone says this to me and i never do it
  • relax!! you’ll be fine, remember to pick a reward for after all this
  • take 3 minutes and type up all you know about a topic. then prioritise what you missed out instead of focusing on what you already know
  • when you reeeeeeaaaaallllly don’t want to revise (but have no valid excuse) get everything you need like pens and paper, set a timer for 10 minutes, and tell yourself you can stop when the timer beeps. sometimes the hard part is starting
  • even if you feel fine, take a break to STAND UP. i never realise how much i need to pee until i stand up. 
  • keep water at your workspace at all times 
  • make sure the temperature is okay in the room
  • its easier to work in a clean tidy room. so, maybe go to the library

i hope you enjoyed these revision and organisation tips. i spent 5 years in secondary, 2 in sixth form, 1 in a foundation year, and 2 at university. i’ve been trying to work out the bare minimum. so i can stress less.

5

I was surprised how many people liked the sword I had at PAX East because it’s not actually the black knight sword (and for all you complainers out there, that’s why it’s too short XD)! It’s a cheap plastic sword I modified in a couple hours, when I realized I didn’t have time to make a sword from scratch. I intend to make some of the black knight weapons from the game for a future convention.

Anyway, here’s a general overview of the steps I took:

1) I used black worbla to change the overall shape of the sword, for example extending the cross guard to look more like the black knight sword. Worbla doesn’t stick to hard plastic very well, so I used a bit of hot glue for extra security (E6000 is probably better, but I was short on time and the next step secures everything in place anyway). Card board or foam would also work for this step.

2) Apoxie sculpt, apoxie sculpt, and more apoxie sculpt. And just in case that wasn’t enough, a bit more apoxie sculpt. This stuff adheres very well to hard plastic so you can use it to fill seams between the worbla and the base sword, add details, and enhance existing details. Detail spam away for more impressive results. (Random tip - if you want to sculpt both sides at the same time, suspend the sword between two tall containers, like i did in the picture. Then you can just rotate it to access both sides.)

3) Prime and paint your sword like you would any other prop. I found auto body primer adheres well to the hard plastic. Then I used the same paint scheme as the armor - metallic black spray paint with hand painted silver accents.

  • After first dance my first year: k that was cool...idk what was with that american pie song tho......
  • Post fourth year third dance: *MUFFLED SOBBING* THEY WERE SINGING *SNIFFLE* BYE BYE MISS AMERICAN PIE DROVE MY CHEVY TO THE LEVY BUT *CHOKES* THE LEVY WAS DRY THEM GOOD OLD BOYS WERE SINGIN THIS'LL BE THE DAY THAT I DIE, THIS'LL BE THE DAY THAT I DIE*COLLAPSES*

tips for writing your (east) asian-american muse

i’m specifying east asian because these points are based on my experience as an east asian girl who grew up in north america 

  • your character doesn’t have to speak their mother tongue, especially if they are 2nd generation and plus asian americans. it’s very sad, but a lot of 2nd gen + asian americans do not speak their mother tongue.
  • for chinese characters; mandarin isn’t the only chinese dialect even though it is the one that is the most spoken. cantonese, teochew ( chiuchow), hokkien are also very commonly spoken chinese dialects in north america.
  • corporal punishment: if the parents are first-generation immigrants, they are most likely to use physical punishment to discipline their children since it is considered normal ( and legal ) in their home country. feather duster ( aah, the famous duster, esp, the one w/ the wooden handle ), a hanger and the belt are asian parents favourite. 
  • asian american children who grew up with abusive parents will most likely think that this is the norm, and that getting beat when you make a mistake/misbehave is normal.
  • communication with the parents can be difficult, especially in the case where the parents don’t speak english well, and the children do not speak the mother tongue well
  • week-end school. speaking from experience, chinese parents tend to send their children to ‘ chinese school’ on sundays so they can learn mandarin. doesn’t mean the children end up speaking mandarin later on ( like me lmao )
  • anti-blackness/colourism is very, very common in asia and it is the same way in overseas asian communities, so just because your character is asian, it doesn’t mean they can’t be racist/ say racist & colourist things ( even if they don’t mean to be racist
  • the same goes with ableism, and there’s the stigma against mental illnesses
  • fat shaming is very common as well
  • for asian parents, eastern medicine is the answer to everything
  • plastic covers on tv remote and plastic covers on couches at your parent’s house
  • you’re not a real south east/east asian if you don’t like durian ( i’m sorry, i don’t make the rules )
  • if your character is a second generation asian american, they’re most likely to still be living with their parents. asian parents take care of their children until they are financially dependent/stable, or until they are married. even then, they’ll probably be living with them. ( some families have up to 5 generations living under the same roof )
  • asian americans can speak languages other than english and their mother tongue ( shoooocking, i KNOW ) 
youtube

Kicks (2016)

When his hard-earned kicks get snatched by a local hood, fifteen-year old Brandon and his two best friends go on an ill-advised mission across the Bay Area to retrieve the stolen sneakers. Featuring a soundtrack packed with hip-hop classics, Justin Tipping’s debut feature is an urban coming-of-age tale told with grit, humor – and surprising lyricism.

Directed by:   Justin Tipping

Starring:   Jahking Guillory, Mahershala Ali, Kofi Siriboe, Christopher Meyer, Christopher Jordan Wallace

Release date:   September 9, 2016

Anyway guys I am moved into Washington….so far so good? Only sorta feels real, except that they punched a hole in my NJ driver’s license today so that’s legit. I have it in front of me rn to like try to take it in. I assume actually starting work tomorrow will help though