concept: me, sitting in a café and revising my notes. on the table are my favourite stationery and drink, and I am thinking about the great things I have planned for later. I enjoy my studies a lot, and am able to manage my time so I can both study and relax doing what I love. I have a healthy sleeping-schedule and am refreshed and at peace with myself and my life.

7

It’s been a while since I’ve made a post, and I figured that these tips might be extra helpful with exam season approaching. As someone who struggles a lot with procrastination, I do everything I can to fight the urge to put assignments off until the last minute (even though I’m not always successful). 

As always, good luck! (ᵔᴥᵔ)

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this week from my bullet journal! november is already off to a good start :)

i just uploaded a video on “how i bullet journal” on my youtube channel + finished 3 essays + almost done with a pile of math homework, so i’m feeling good and productive and fantastic!!! ahhh it was a good weekend :’)

//partially taken from my studygram :-)

In honor of my 5th semester in a row of all A’s (hell yeah boiiiii) I’m going to make this post. I don’t know how I did it because I am honestly so lazy.

  1. Grades are reflective of your work ethic and your ability to strategize, not your intelligence.
  2. Be real with yourself. Are you sure you are ready to commit to perfect grades? Are you ready to work, day in and day out, when it sucks and classes are boring and hard? Are you ready to feel satisfied for all of the hard work you put in? If the answer is yes, congratulations. You are on your way to becoming a straight-A student.
  3. Prioritize classes. Not every class requires the same amount of work, and you should find out the hardest classes early on in the semester. These will take the most time, and you will have to spend extra time and effort to get a good grade. When choosing classes, make sure you will be able to handle them. Make sure you will be able to ace all of them, at the same time. That being said, don’t shy away from hard classes. You have to challenge yourself. Take a few AP’s. They are worth it.
  4. Make friends with teachers/professors, especially the ones that teach hard subjects. I am very close with my chemistry professor, and this has proved invaluable because I am able to get free tutoring, as well as a great recommendation letter for college apps.
  5. Have other goals. You need to do something that is not studying to keep you productive. I would highly recommend joining a sports team or club. I exercise (usually running and weightlifting) at least 2 hours a day, usually more. Playing 2 sports made me more healthy, social, and productive. Running calms me down, and weightlifting makes me feel strong. Do whatever makes you feel good, as long as it’s healthy.
  6. Learn to manage time well. How do I play 2 sports, get straight A’s, have a studyblr, and have time to spare? The answer is that I take care of myself well. I go to bed at 10:30 or 11 each night so I can get 7 ish hours of sleep. I do homework during lunch or in class so I don’t do it at home.
  7. Slack off. Yep. I said it. I complete assignments strategically, spending the most time on things worth the most points. Things that will only take a few minutes can occasionally be done in class right before the teacher is collecting homework. I have done this all too often. That being said, small assignments really do add up so make sure you do an acceptable job and turn them in on time.
  8. Turn something in. It is ok to sometimes slack off in quality, but if something is due, you better turn something in. Something is better than nothing. Getting extensions on assignments for no reason will make the teacher think you are lazy, or don’t care about their class. Every single essay and worksheet does not have to be your best work, but make sure you fill the basic assignment requirements, and it should be enough. 
  9. Extra. Credit. Some classes don’t offer this, but if they do, just freaking do it man. Knowing you can miss an assignment because you did extra credit earlier is the best feeling, especially when doing that assignment would have meant losing sleep. 
  10. Plan (sort of). I have a bullet journal where I write important assignments down. As I said, there are some assignments not worth your time that you can half-ass. The ones I write down are the ones I need to do well. If you write down every. last. assignment. you will burn out and stop planning altogether. 
  11. Sometimes, go above and beyond. You know that subject you really like? With an awesome teacher? Spend time on it. Make your project extra beautiful, and read ahead in the textbook. Watch video lectures online, and maybe even make a studyblr post about it. Your extra work might not be turned in for credit, but it will make you feel a whole lot more knowledgeable on the subject. Do this for classes you hate, too. Maybe it’s not as bad as you think it is. The extra effort might allow you to see the beauty in a subject you used to despise. 
  12. Be real with yourself (again). This past semester, I had a B+ for a few months in a subject I really love. I wasn’t mad, and I didn’t stress about it, because, honestly? It doesn’t really matter. Eventually I brought the grade up again, but it would be fine to me either way. 
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201016 | new member of the studyblr community here! 🌿✨ finally got around to photographing my 2017 hobonichi planner + the parts of my ebay stationery haul that have arrived, the lighting was terrible this week bc of the rain.

Quick Time Management Tips

1. Be aware of any lurking deadlines.

2. Plan out your day.

3. Define and limit the time for each task.

4. Set reminders.

5. Plan to be early, not just on time.

6. Allow yourself some margin in your day.

7. Say “no” to distractions, including the distraction of friends.

8. Prioritize.

9. Ignore unimportant details.

10.Concentrate and focus while you’re working.

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I’m sure we all know how tricky time management and productivity can be, and also how crucial it is to be good at it, to succeed. So, I’d like to share a strategy of effectively managing all of those tasks you have at hand! 

Introducing Dwight Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States. He lived a super productive life, and during his presidency he implemented many transformational programs including NASA and the Atomic Energy act. Before then, he was a 5 star general in the US army, serving as the supreme commander, he was also the president of Columbia University… I could go on. 

My point is, he did all of this while still having time for personal interests and hobbies like painting and golfing. He was amazing at time management, and his most famous method of handling tasks, is called the Eisenhower Matrix

It’s a method of prioritising and sorting out your to-dos based on urgency and importance.  

It is super helpful is making us question what is important and actually necessary to do. I think that we often fill up our time with tasks that do not help us in reaching our core goals, and this method helps us narrow down our todos, saving us from wasting time, energy, and resources.

The 2nd and 3rd quadrant (not urgent important, urgent-not important) is what really minimises our productivity, if not properly managed and scheduled

I personally think its a fairly good way of understanding all that you have to do, what you should do first, and how you can deal with the rest. You don’t have to necessarily plan everything out this way, but its a good mindset to adopt when managing your workload. 

I’m so so awful at being concise (I’m so sorry for the long post!!) But I help this has helped you guys. Hopefully I’m going to post a printable of the matrix in the near future, so keep an eye out for that :)

What is important is seldom urgent and what is urgent is seldom important.
-Dwight Eisenhower

Try to get up early! I know a lot of people who like to sleep in, but I also know some who don’t feel productive if they don’t get up early. Getting up early (and not necessarily super early, maybe one or two hours later than you’d get up for school) on the weekend or on a day off gets you moving and ready to start your day. 

Do some sort of exercise early in the day. It doesn’t have to be intense or a lot, but get moving. It could be anything from an actual workout to just walking to a bookstore or coffeeshop to start your day.

Eat breakfast! If you don’t like getting up early, eating a really good breakfast can make your day. And if you do get up early, you’ll have enough time to actually make something.

Schedule your day. Don’t schedule it down to the last minute, but schedule the big things you need to get done. If you need an alert on your phone or computer to remind you, some good calendars I recommend are: Timepage, Google Calendar, Schoolhub Students(not necessarily a calendar but the best I’ve used for tracking assignments),  and Outlook Calendar(ok so Sunrise was THE BEST calendar app I have ever used but it was discontinued and kind of moved to Outlook).

Write down absolutely everything you need to accomplish. Do this first. It doesn’t matter how big or how small it is, just do it. It might be a pretty long list, and that’s ok. If you have bigger tasks, like writing a paper, break it down further into something like research, brainstorm, thesis, etc. You can further break those down too. The eventual goal is to break down the massive tasks into small, manageable things that you can handle so you don’t feel overwhelmed. 

Prioritize the things you need to do. What I generally tend to do is prioritize the assignments and tests that are coming up first, but if I have a bigger test after them, that can become an equal priority. So for example, if I have a worksheet due first period tomorrow, a quiz fourth period that same day, and a major test two days away, I would do the worksheet first, do about half my studying for the major test, study for the quiz, then finish my studying for the major test. 

Get started on something! Once you’ve got all your ducks in a row, get to work. If music helps you focus, listen to it, or if wearing a comfy sweater helps you destress, wear it. Find what works for you and use it to your advantage. 

Don’t forget to take breaks. Use something to help you time your breaks- I personally like to use forest, but one that I’ve tried and liked is flat tomato. Do something you like during your breaks- your brain needs time to process what you’ve been working on. 

Try to get all of your work done before evening- but if you don’t get it all done, it’s not the end of the world. Use this time for yourself, so watch a good movie, eat dinner, play an instrument, whatever makes you happy. This is your self-care time- you work hard and you deserve it!

-keaton

  1. Set your priorities straight. As you’ve entered school, you know that your academics are basically one of your priorities, aside from your personal health. You are a student, after all. You should know that you should be making time for all the school work you’re supposed to be dealing with. If you’re having trouble with this, I suggest you write your priorities down, and rank them according to which one weighs the most. This will make you feel much more headstrong and goal-oriented.
  2. Use schedulers and planners. You’re human and it’s okay to forget things. Get digital with apps and programs or get traditional with notebooks and planners. Involve your planning with a combination of both. This really helps especially if you’ve created a system for remembering things more efficiently, eg. color-coding, bullet journaling, weekly overviews, having legends, etc., which leads us to the next point:
  3. Schedule in advance. Complete the difficult tasks, the easy tasks, the medium tasks. Do what you can. Set deadlines for yourself. If you’re fully aware that three weeks from now, you’ll have 3 exams in a day, start studying as early as possible. If you have to attend to an event and have an exam the day after, bring any study material with you. Do homework the day they’re given to you, especially if they’re fairly easy. If they need some research or data collection, make it a point that you do it after class or on the nearest weekend. Break the habit of doing something because a classmate has already started doing his/hers. Instead, do it for the motivation that you’ve set for yourself.
  4. Prevent causes of distraction. There are only 24 hours in a day, and a fraction of which we use for fulfilling our basic necessities. Utilize the remaining time for productivity. Delete social media apps if you have to, or turn off your internet. Better yet, turn off your phone and exchange phones with your roommate or your friend. Keep it. Forget about it for a moment. You can always leave your feed but it will never leave you. You can always return to it after you’ve done your work.
  5. Multi-task! I can never stress the importance of learning multi-tasking enough. Whenever I’m in a long meeting, I usually bring my laptop to review notes or write a paper. Of course, it would seem rude to some so it’s better if you would give them a heads-up. If I’m in a class I find easy and if the professor allows us to study or drift off, I usually study for other classes that I need more attention in. While I take showers, I discuss the exam material from my memory out loud. If you have to wait in line for some errand, bring a book. Sometimes while doing my night care routine, I would listen to audio recordings of my professor. Some of these examples may come off as rude or off-putting, I know. But that’s just me. You can always find other safer situations where you could practice multi-tasking.
  6. Now, not tomorrow. If you happen to finish a scheduled task and got a little free time, it gives you all the reason to do some of the things you have scheduled for other days. If you can do it now without any constraint, why would you choose to do it later?
  7. Ask for help. If a friend’s not too busy, don’t be afraid to ask for a little help! You can ask them favors of proofreading your essay. You can ask them about the notes that you didn’t take down of. You can ask them about how this certain professor’s exam types. The possibilities are endless. Just know the right people and places. Don’t dwell too much on tiny details. If you have misunderstood a certain topic, ask your roommate, ask the person next door. Go to the nearest library. Check the internet for answers. You can consult your teacher or professor. Don’t be afraid to ask for a little assistance. No man is an island.
  8. You have all the time on your hands. If you believe that you can do it, and if you really want to do it, you will. Taking up other commitments and responsibilities is never a problem, as long as you know you can handle them without sacrificing another. You are always allowed to say no. If you have as many organizations as me, remember that work should never get in the way of your priorities. Just keep in mind that everyone has their certain limits, and you do too.
  9. If all else fails, CLUTCH IT!! I’m not joking, I’ve done this multiple times. I came out alive but I have to admit that not all of my crammed output had the best marks (although some of them did!). If you don’t want to be in this heart-racing situation, then be as diligent as possible with your work! Make it a habit.

Always remember that these tips may or may not help anyone the same as it did with me, but I’m glad that I have this opportunity to get this out there. Find your rhythm. I know it takes time, but don’t stress yourself too much because all of your efforts will be successful. Some efforts may just be rewarded in ways that you didn’t plan to, while some just lead you nearer to your dreams. Just keep doing you, and you’ll get through this.

I believe in you.

Hi there!!!

So an anon requested a masterpost about a new semester, so I kinda made this… :D also, this is a collab with Chinmay from @studyruels, be sure to check his masterpost about maintaining a routine during the semester here!

ORGANIZATION

To start your semester or school year well, you need to make sure everything is neat and organized.

  1. Clean your room. Clean your desk, bookshelves, wardrobe, wipe the surfaces. Either donate or throw away things that you don’t need. Sort out your books, textbooks, papers, pens… throw away pens that don’t write anymore, put your papers and notes in folders, binders… 
  2. Organize your PC files! This is so important and everyone (and I’m no exception ahaha rIP) neglect this. If you work with your computer a lot (and I’m pretty sure most of you do), organize your files into appropriate folders so you can quickly find them. Believe me, it’s awful searching for a document you made a while ago and you forgot where you had saved it. Pro-tip - try to have less things on your desktop, as it slows down your computer ^^
  3. Buy a planner/ set up a bullet journal. Or you can try both of the systems :D I recommend this one because it really comes in handy to see everything you have to do written in front of you. Carry it with you and write down every event, exam date or due date, write your homework, plan out your days and study sessions… plus you can make it pretty too~~ :D you can find out more about setting up a bullet journal here.
  4. Buy your supplies as soon as possible. This one goes with the “clean your room” section - if you have your supplies beforehand, you can organize your room better, find the right place to keep them and so on. Moreover, you don’t have to rush after the semester starts with finding the texbooks, finding a place in your shelves, tidying up you room….

STUDYING

  1. Try to study everyday. Or like almost everyday (it’s good to have some break days in between so you relax). It’s important to revise your material after class, so you don’t have to stress before the exams too much.
  2. Take your own notes. Whether typed or handwritten, find out whatever works best for you, just take some notes please. I guarantee that you will regret it if you don’t.
  3. Read your textbooks and supplementary material the teacher gives you. You don’t have to read those before the class or so, but don’t procrastinate, don’t.. how do you say it.. neglect them, these are really important, too. (and it really comes in handy to take notes from these materials)
  4. Don’t hesitate to ask for help when you need it. Especially when you don’t understand what’s going on in the class. The teachers are there to HELP you to TEACH you, so take advantage of that and ask them when you don’t know ;)

More about studying and study methods here ^^

SOME OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS YOU SHOULDN’T FORGET

  1. Sleep. sleep sleep sleep don’t be like my classmates who just don’t sleep and make me worry about them just sleep at least six hours. Eight hours is ideal, but at least six pleas (of course, this varies from person to another, so just find what works for you). You don’t have to go to bet extremely early or wake up extremely early, just get some rest.
  2. Drink water. Stay hydrated!!!!
  3. Eat. Do not skip meals. Eat your breakfast. Try to make your own healthy lunch. Eat fruit! Eat cakes and chocolate and ice cream and rice and vegetable soups~ I mean like don’t diet too much, don’t overdo it ^^
  4. Remember that not everything is about studying. Relax, read, surf the internet, spend time with your family and friends. 

Best of luck during your new semester/school year/term!!!

I want to make a full masterpost for each of these that goes into more detail, but I don’t know which to do first, so let me know what you’d like to see! SORRY this is so long omg I got carried away

1. Time Management

  • it’s impossible to study 3 subjects at a single time
  • it’s not practical to do all your homework on Sunday night
  • make a to-do list!!!
  • make sure you have (and update) a planner!
  • I have lots more on time management so I’ll probably make a masterpost v soon if it would be helpful!!

2. Breaks Things into Smaller Tasks

  • how do you eat an elephant?
  • in smalll bites.
  • look at everything you do as progress
  • if you have 85 math problems and you’ve done 10, you’ve made progress.
  • knowing that you’re making progress towards a goal is going to help motivate you!!
  • don’t be afraid to use this on your to-do list
  • write “do ten math problems” ten times in your planner
  • not “do all math problems” once!!!

3. Highlighting and Rereading are Not Effective on Their Own

  • if it works for you that’s alright!!
  • I’m just sharing what I’ve learned
  • Why doesn’t this work for most people?
  • because it isn’t active learning

4. Become an Active Learner

  • “active learner” wow sounds scary
  • fear not!! with a little practice you’ll see what it’s all about!
  • rereading something won’t make you fully understand it
  • you might remember some definitions (which is good)! but
  • unless you can use the word in new context, it’s not really useful in your long term memory
  • here’s more on actually becoming an active learner
  • use the quizzes at the back of your textbook chapters
  • or find quizzes online (or make your own if you can’t find any)
  • don’t just answer the question, explain why your answer is right
  • do this in as much detail as you can
  • why? because this will force you to use your learned information in a new way
  • if you don’t know how to explain it, read your notes and book again until you can write out an answer

Keep reading

“Productivity is about making smart choices (continuously) with your energy, focus and time in order to maximise your potential and achieve beneficial results.” – Mohammed Faris


1. Find your energy hours.

Everyone has a specific time in the day where their energy levels are much higher than usual. Use that time to your advantage. Take that energy and get the majority of your work done and out of the way.

For me, the mornings are usually when I feel the most energised, so I get to work straight away. To find your energy hours, try working at different times during the day. See which time of the day allows you to work at your very best.


2. Establish routines.

Once you have found your energy hours, base your day around this. Create a routine for each day of the week.

When do you study? When do you go to school? Do you relax for an hour after coming back from school? Do you tidy your room on Sunday?

Establish a schedule and you’re less likely to get side-tracked and much more likely to maximise your productivity.


3. Ditch the to-do lists.

Yes, it’s good to write lists of things you need to do, but you’re never going to get around to doing them if you don’t plan time for it. So instead of relying on a to-do list, add the task to your routine. Will you be able to work on this task on a Saturday afternoon? Great! Put it into your schedule. This will ensure the task is completed.


4. Don’t multi-task.

You can’t do multiple things at once. It seems like you’re able to, but what you’re really doing is constantly switching your attention from one task to another. Don’t do that. Focus on one thing at a time. That way, you’re putting all of your attention on a task and are likely to get it completed faster and at a higher standard.


5. Complete similar tasks together.

If you’re studying, instead of switching from subject to subject throughout the day, try to stick to one subject. On Monday, create flashcards for a Biology topic, then revise the topic and then do a Biology past paper. This will ensure your mind is concentrated on one thing at a time and not constantly switching gears.

So get your chores done together. Study one subject at a time. Send your e-mails and messages at one time. Dedicate today to your English essay. Don’t interrupt tasks with an unrelated task.


6. Finish quick and easy tasks first.

If you need to make a dentist appointment, do it. Do you need to write a quick e-mail to your teacher? Get it out of the way.

Finishing the quick and easy tasks right away will leave you with ample time to tackle the more challenging ones you’ve got up ahead. It will also give you peace of mind that you’ve gotten something done today.


7. Take breaks.

You’re not a machine. Productivity is not working 24/7.

“Being productive is about knowing when to have fun and when to work hard; when to relax and when to be serious. It’s about making smart choices.”

Allow your mind and body to take a break every now and then and relax. Scheduling these breaks can be beneficial so that you’re not constantly taking a break when you don’t need to.


8. Prioritise.

Yes, that idea you had on the train was appealing, but is it really that beneficial? Is it important enough for you to spend your valuable time and energy on it? Will it get you where you want to go? Probably not.

So prioritise projects and tasks. Ensure important tasks are completed first and well before any upcoming deadlines. Make sure that your time is better spent doing things that will actually benefit you and bring you closer to your goals.


9. Become accountable to someone.

It’s super easy to make promises to yourself, saying that you will do this and do that. Likewise, it’s also extremely easy to break those promises.

However, this is different when you have someone you are accountable to. Perhaps, at the end of every week, you can report to a parent or a trusted friend on your progress so far. It’s extremely difficult to tell someone that you haven’t accomplished your goals for the week. This will make it far more likely for you to get your work done.


10. Review your progress.

At the end of each day, you should evaluate your progress. What did you accomplish today? What did you do well? What did you not complete today? Why? How could you improve? When will you complete it?

Asking yourself these questions and being honest will help you see where you’re going right and where you’re not doing so well.


I hope this is useful to some of you and that you put your time and energy into good use. 😊

This year my little sister is starting high school (year 7 in Australia). To help her out I decided to write a quick post with the advice I wish I’d been given when I was her age. I hope that it will make her transition easier, and hope that it will do the same for other students starting year 7. I don’t feel like writing a rambly intro today, so let’s get right into it:

Advice On School Supplies

There are some items on an average school-issued supplies list that will probably never be used, and other items not on the list that can be useful to have. These are some items I’ve found to be useful (and not so useful) over my four years at high school.

Useful (PURCHASE):

  • Good gel or fine liner pens: Most school lists tell you to get the most basic supermarket ballpoint pens available. In my experience, these just don’t cut it for the amount of writing you need to do in high school. My suggestion? A gel pen or fine liner with small nib and heavy ink flow. A grip can add extra comfort, but personally, I don’t find one necessary. Brand wise, I love Muji 0.35/0.5 gels, Staedtler Triplus fine liners, and Arline 400 fine liners.
  • Plastic document folders: These are so, so useful! Last year I had one of these for each subject (a different colour for each!) and used them to store a notebook and any handouts that I needed for the class. They protected my papers from damage and also helped me stay organised by keeping everything from the subject in one spot and letting me just grab one folder before class rather than multiple items.
  • White out tape: So much better than the liquid stuff. For one it doesn’t require drying time, and it also doesn’t run the risk of bursting and ruining your pencil case/school bag/notebook/uniform/etc.

Not Useful (GO WITHOUT):

  • Binders: These are so clunky! If you have one per subject then they take up too much space in your bag, and if you have one for everything then you have to carry all your materials to every class. Unless you just keep loose leaf paper in a slim binder (rather than notebooks), then I suggest using plastic folders instead.
  • Binder books: Just get normal notebooks. As mentioned above, binders are clunky and unnecessary. I find it better to use non-punched books, as they don’t have holes that get in the way of your writing. Or alternatively, just fill a slim binder with loose leaf and use that instead of multiple notebooks.

Advice On Class Schedules

One of the things I struggled with most when starting high school was remembering what class I had when and what room I needed to be in. The best way to stay on top of your schedule is to write it down. However I suggest using a digital program rather than pen and paper - your schedule is likely enough to change that you want to be able to make adjustments easily. You can write it in a word processing program, but I find it most useful to use an app. With a program such as iStudiez or My Study Life on your phone/tablet, you can easily schedule your classes and also add in homework due dates. Download one of these (or a similar program), and you won’t have any problems managing your timetable.

Advice On Staying Organised

The single most useful organisational tool I’ve found in four years of searching is a program called Trello. Available as both a desktop site and a mobile app, Trello has been a saviour when it comes to staying on top of tasks. The best thing about it, and what stands it apart from other organisational tools, is its great user interface. Trello, like many other programs, allows you to set lists of tasks to be completed. Like other programs, it allows you to categorise tasks and add sub-tasks. What makes it different from other programs is the way it allows you to organise and prioritise tasks. It has a simple drag and drop interface which lets you move tasks between lists with ease, and you can do the same to re-order tasks within a single list. This is super useful when it comes to sorting tasks by priority or setting up a running-order of tasks for the day. If you want to know exactly how I use Trello, just shoot me and ask and we can set up a screenshare to explain.

Advice On Taking Notes

The best advice I can give you on taking notes is just to make sure you keep them detailed and up-to-date. A good, complete set of notes is so useful when it comes to studying for tests, and you really don’t want to leave note-taking to right before one. At year 7-9 level I found taking notes in class and from class slideshows to be adequate, but in year 10 it became important to take notes from textbooks too. This will vary school-to-school, but you can use these year levels as loose guidelines.

Advice On Studying  

Spread. It. Out. I’m serious. You’re tempted to procrastinate? You’re tempted to study in one big block the weekend before the test? Don’t. Please. Trust me when I say it’s not nice to spend six hours in a day studying for the one test. Instead, study in short bursts, but study regularly. For a 7th-10th grader, I think it’s enough if your regular study regime is to simply summarise your notes at the end of each week, make flashcards, and give them a once-over study. When it comes near test time, you’ll only need a short study session to prepare. In this session I suggest you do the following:

  • Chuck the flashcards you know you’ve already memorised. Study the rest until they stick (<30 minutes).
  • Do a practice test or some practice exercises (I suggest Khan Academy for maths practice), focusing on the skills/question types you have the most trouble with (~1 hour).
  • Get together with some friends and use Kahoot to have a competitive, time-restricted quiz on the test content. You can find a pre-made quiz, or create your own for more focused study. For me, this is a really fun way to study and also the best way to make information stick long-term (~30 minutes).

Spread these activities out over the week before the test, and you are way less likely to feel overloaded than if you leave everything to the last minute.    

Advice On Homework

Repeat after me: Do it before you have to. As much as it’s tempting to procrastinate, you’ll feel much less stressed if you don’t leave work to the last minute. Rather than completing only what you have to on any given day, I suggest you work until one of the following occurs:

  1. You run out of set work to do.
  2. It becomes too late to study (please stop studying at least an hour before bed and spend some time giving yourself a little TLC instead).
  3. You become too tired out and feel you can’t work productively anymore (if you don’t have anything left due tomorrow then leave the work to another day, but if you still need to complete things then take a break or nap before getting back to it).   

Advice On Time Management

In lower high school, you’ll probably find that it is unnecessary to strictly manage your time, as long as you don’t waste it. By this I mean you will rarely feel you don’t have time to complete required work, as long as you don’t waste your time on pseudo-productive tasks like creating ultra-pretty presentations or copying your notes out. Just stick to the tasks that are actually required of you.

Advice On Making Friends

JOIN CLUBS! Clubs are a great way to have fun, get involved, and also meet people with the same interests as you. They provide a semi-structured environment in which to initiate conversation, rather than you having to randomly approach new people (which, if you are like me, is SCARY!), and also keep you meeting with your new pals on a regular basis. Once you getting chatting with someone you like, just invite them to sit with you at lunch and you’re off to a great start.

5 Tips for Staying Motivated

1. Reward as you go. You should be proud of everything you accomplish along the way, not just the destination itself. So be happy when you complete one assignment or find sources for an essay, don’t just focus on the overall grade at the end of the year.

2. Set goals. Early in the semester, you need to establish what you want to accomplish this school year. Whether that be study more or go out less, you need to make and write down a plan right off the bat. 

3. Don’t get discouraged. We all mess up. We all get behind in school work or break one of the rules we set for ourselves. That’s just a part of life. DO NOT use this as an excuse to give up though. Just start doing it again the next day. It won’t be the end of the world unless you give up complete. 

4. Do things sooner rather than later. Try to get your work done as soon as possible. When you get home from school, take a short break, and I mean SHORT, and then get your assignments done for the day. That way, you can just relax and chill until you go to bed, rather than pulling an all nighter if something ends up taking longer than expected. 

5. Procrastinate with other work. Let’s say you don’t want to read a chapter of a book for a class. Well, before doing that, go ahead and clean your room and practice your violin. If you’re going to procrastinate, do it with something worthwhile, rather than spending hours on tumblr. At least that’s a few less things you have to do later on.