tide line

2

March 27th, 2007: Happy 10th Anniversary to the Mortal                             Instruments by @cassandraclare​!

First Dialogues:

City of Bones:  “You’ve got to be kidding me,”

City of Ashes:  “Are you still mad?”

City of Glass:  “Score, I’m kicking butt at Mario Kart”

City of Fallen Angels:  “Just coffee, please.”

City of Lost Souls: “Mom, its me!”

City of Heavenly Fire:  “Picture something calming. The beach in Los Angeles—white sand, crashing blue water, you’re strolling along the tide line …” Jace cracked an eye open. “This sounds very romantic.”

City of Heavenly Fire (last line): “Freely we serve, because we freely love, as in our will, to love or not; in this we stand or fall”

Humans and Terraforming

If there is one thing that can be said, humans are very good at changing their environment. Now regardless of your views on climate change or greenhouse gases, it cannot be denied that humans have left a big and very literally mark on our planet.

We’ve been doing it ever since our primeval ancestors figured out that fire can be used to clear forest, and that the grasslands created by such burning attracts grazing animals and gives us a clear line of sight for our throwing spears and nets. We have been doing it ever since the ancient humans figured out they could damn creeks to make ponds that lured in waterfowl. That if you repeatedly burned a clearing, the berry bushes would keep coming back ever year. That if you created stone walls along the low tide line, you could create sandy terraces that are perfect for clams. We managed our resources, only fishing at certain times, only hunting certain types of animals, or only cutting certain types of trees.

Then we invented agriculture and we wrought even more changes on the planet. We cleared forests to make room for our fields, pastures and cities. We terraced entire hillsides to allow us to grow crops. We drained swamps and cut the landscape with irrigation canals to provide our crops with water. Often we changed the very course of rivers and altered the soil we relied on, sometimes for better and sometimes for worse. Forests disappeared as our cities and emerging states needed timber for construction, ship-building, and fuel to make pottery, smelt metals, cook our food, and keep us warm.

But we didn’t just change the landscape, we also changed the plants we grew so that they suited our needs. We changed the animals we relied on. We turned wolves into dogs, auroch into cows, ibex into goats, jungle fowl into chickens, and wild boars into pigs. We called this process domestication, and soon quickly forgot that we had ever been without these domesticates.

We made artificial hills for our rituals, built mountains out of cut stone to mark the tombs of revered rulers, carved symbols into the landscape. Sliced into mountains to carve roads, mine metal ores, and quarry stone. We made monuments so astounding that people thousands of years later thought they must have been made by the gods, and buildings of the modern age that dwarf them.

We’ve also traveled. We’ve crossed all our oceans, bringing with us the animals and plants of our homelands, and returning home with the animals and plants of other lands. Some is intentional. New crops that offer new advantages. Animals from far away to awe visitors or remind us of home. Some is unintentional. Plant seeds lodged in the tread of our boots. Insect larva in the bilge of our ships. Rats that scurry and stay out of sight, and hitch a ride on our sailing ships and outrigger canoes. Some we regret bringing, intentionally or not, others have settled in and carved their own place in their new home.

And now we look to the stars and wonder if we could do the same to other planets. To bring our life and our world to the stars. To turn a red planet green and blue.

And what if we succeeded? What if a red planet turned green, and flushed with our success, we turned to other balls of rock orbiting distant stars.

And what if we encountered other life. Life that was like us, but also very different. What if they had never seen life like ours before, that spread to the stars turning red, grey, and brown planets blue and green.

What if some are fearful. What if they seen our domesticated animals, our sculpted landscapes, and our diverse nations and fear that we will assimilate and change them and their world like we did to our ancient animal enemies and our distant home planet.

But what is some our awed, and look at us and see a species that can not only adapt itself to new and challenges and environments, but that also changes the challenge and environment itself. Often changing and adapting to the changes they themselves wrought. For better and worse, humanity sailed the stars on the crest of a wave of change that they themselves have been creating since their distant ancestors set fire to the underbrush and realized they could use this.

People like us  
are born with stardust in our bones,  
with sunsets on our lips,  
with supernovas in our chests  
     ready to explode

People like us  
are born with glittering white slates,  
with hands clean as the first snowfall,  
with smiles bright as sunlit mornings  
     just so we can stain them red

People like us  
are born with no time on our clocks   
with no gravesite marked with our names,  
with no afterlife waiting our arrival  
     timeless, deathless, endless

—  people like us: the sinners, the fallen, the ghosts, the heroes ( j.p. )
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TESTUDINE TUESDAY

-Classification-

Common Name: Green Sea Turtle

Aliases: Green Turtle, Black Sea Turtle, Pacific Green Turtle

Scientific Name: Chelonia mydas


                                                   Kingdom: Animalia

                                                    Phylum: Chordata

                                                       Class: Reptilia

                                                     Order: Testudines

                                                  Suborder: Cryptodira

                                                  Clade: Americhelydia

                                                   Family: Cheloniidae

                                                      Genus: Chelonia

                                                     Species: C.mydas


-General Info-

Size: Adults can reach up to 5 feet long (1.5 meters).

Weight: Adults can weigh up to 150 - 419 pounds (68 - 190 kilograms).

Carapace Length (Shell): Adults on average have a shell length between 31 - 44 inches (78 - 112 centimeters).

Gender Differences: Males have a slightly longer tail and are overall larger than females in size. Males also have longer claws on their front flippers. However, both do have paddle-like flippers which aid in their swimming. 

Lifespan (Wild): Green Sea Turtles that reach maturity can live for roughly 80 years.

Diet: Juvenile Green Sea Turtles are initially carnivorous (diet consists mainly or exclusively of meat) eating things like mollusks (snails and clams), sponges, algae, and even fish eggs. As they’re maturing, they’ll incorporate plants into their diet and are considered omnivorous (diet consists of both meats and plants). Once they’re fully-grown adults, most of them are herbivores and have cut out meat in their diets due to their serrated jaw (saw-like) which helps them chew plant life like various sea grasses and algae.

Group: A group of Sea Turtles is called a bale.

                                          

-Habitat and Lifestyle-

Life Cycle: Almost everyone knows that Sea Turtles hatch from eggs that are laid on beaches in Southeast Asia, India, western Pacific islands, and Central America. One of the most dangerous events in a Sea Turtle’s life happens as soon as they hatch. As they attempt to flee into the ocean they may be attacked by predators like birds and crabs; a big percentage of hatchlings won’t make it to the water. Juveniles who did make it to the water spend anywhere from 3 - 5 years in the deep ocean. After their years of exploration, the juveniles will find shallow watered areas to call home for the rest of their days. Sadly, estimations say that only about 1% of Sea turtle hatchlings will make it to sexual maturity which occurs after about 20 - 50 years. Finally, once mating occurs the female will breach the ocean’s surface past the high tide line of the beach to lay her eggs. She then returns back to the sea. 

Breeding: Mating occurs every 2 - 4 years.

Gender Deciding Factors: Nests in areas above 30 degrees Celsius tend to favor female hatchlings whereas areas below 30 degrees Celsius tend to favor male hatchlings. Egg positioning also plays a role in whether a hatchling may be male or female. If the egg is more towards the center of the nest then it has a higher chance of resulting in a female hatchling due to the center being warmer.

Number of Eggs per Nest: Each nest will contain about 110 eggs.

Number of Nests per Season: On average, a female Sea Turtle can create 2 - 8 nests in a single season.

Habitats: Generally, Green Sea Turtles stay near island and continental coastlines. Depending on their stage in life, Green Sea Turtles can be found in many different types of environments. Younger juveniles can be found in the open ocean as they spend years swimming around before they settle down. Older juveniles and mature adults will find permanent residence in areas that are more shallow like coral reefs, seagrass beds near shore, and salt marshes. These areas are generally good spots for protecting the turtles. Globally, you can find Sea Turtles in warm tropical waters to subtropical waters. 

                  

-Role in the Ecosystem and Endangerment-

Ecosystem Roles: In the varying areas Sea Turtles can be found, they have a strikingly powerful role to play in each. For instance, on the beaches where their eggs lay cracked and empty, key nutrients are given to the ecosystem through the eggshells. For the turtles located in the seagrass beds, they feed on the seagrass and in doing so they improve the health and development of the seagrass; this in turn results in a suitable habitat and place for feeding for various species of fish and crustaceans (crabs, shrimp, barnacles, crayfish, etc). 

Conservation Status: Green Sea Turtles are listed as Endangered whereas some subpopulations in the Mediterranean are listed as Critically Endangered. Some human-caused threats include being hunted, poached, and having their eggs collected. Whereas accidental threats like boats, pollution, habitat destruction, and fishing nets are reducing the population as well. 

Illusions

Author: @the-porcelain-doll-xo as part of The Cartel: Boogie Nights And Colombian White 

Creative Content Contributors: @baebae-goodnight (always coming in clutch with amazing moodboards).

Word Count: 5,106

Warnings: language, sexually explicit content, drug use

A/N: Beginning of this one shot starts where Kyungsoo’s ends. The reader is the same as at the end of that particular one shot.

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foreignnprincess  asked:

Hello! Maybe this has been asked before. But any tips on figuring out your foundation color? I can never seem to get it right.

Ahhh, the good old annoying foundation dilemma. It’s either too dark, too light, too yellow, too pink, not pink enough, doesn’t give enough coverage or looks cakey. Finding a foundation that matches your skintone perfectly sometimes seems impossible. If you’ve been applying foundation on to the back of your hand to see whether or not it matches your skintone; you’ve been doing it wrong.

First of all, I recommend when colour matching that you wear no makeup, have your hair tied back and wear an outfit where your chest/decolletage is visible, this will help you match the colour accurately.

Makeup Counters

Sometimes (although not always) a makeup artist/consultant in a makeup store or at a makeup counter will be able to match your skin tone to foundation, whenever I’m looking for a foundation I usually ask for a sample of the foundation in the shade I’ve been matched to and also a shade that is similar, but slightly lighter or darker, this is because: A. Under store lighting foundation may appear to match you perfectly, but look orange the moment you step outside into natural lighting and; B. because certain foundations (especially those of the oil controlling variety) can oxidize and change to a darker colour or different undertone so you may actually need a lighter shade. Once you know your foundation match in one brand or product, it is much easier to find other matches.

Online apps

Which brings me to my next point; once you know your foundation shade in a couple of brands you can start taking out some of the guesswork and get to know your skin better.  Websites like http://findation.com help you find foundations that will match your skin-tone based on the current shades of foundation you use and are especially helpful when buying a drugstore foundation or ordering a product online. Temptalia also has a great reader generated tool called the “Foundation Matrix

Display Testers

Display testers aren’t the best or most hygienic option when it comes to testing makeup, but sometimes they can be the most convenient. I’m not an advocate for using testers on your skin/face/eyes/lips, but this is one exception. Having a play with the testers in store can help you get a better idea of what texture and tones you like in your foundation.

The Test

When testing foundation I recommend that you take three shades that you think are close to your skin-tone and “swatch” them on your decolletage. Blend them in slightly and whichever shade blends in is your ideal shade. As a general rule your foundation should match your body but also not look obvious on your face or neck (or you will get the dreaded tide line) If you haven’t found your perfect match with the first three swatches, try some other shades and also consider looking at other brands. Not every brand and every product is suitable for everyone.

I also recommend taking a compact mirror, heading outside and checking that the shade matches in natural light before committing to purchase. If the foundation matches in natural light it should look seamless in every light.

Also check out the following resources:

How to Apply Foundation

How to Prep Your Skin For Foundation

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I hope I helped you and if you need anything else feel free to ask.

If any product you use causes you irritation discontinue use immediately.

*Please view my disclosure policy regarding information and products mentioned on this blog.

Another adorable little Pachygrapsus crassipes at Barview Jetty in Garibaldi OR, 30 August 2017. I saw tons of these guys down there, but (understandably) they’d scramble for shelter and wedge themselves into crevices the moment I blundered across them.

If you were in search of life, you needn’t look beyond the backyard of our house in California, where the ocean and sand swallowed each other and created hundreds of tide pools lining the rocks. When I was younger, I would spend hours walking along the beach and looking at the tide pools, at the octopi teeming along the sides, at zebra mussels stuck to the spines of stones. The other kids would stick their grubby hands inside the pools in an attempt to grasp a snail or hermit crab to keep as a treasure, as a prize. I never understood why. Here where the snow routinely gulps up the earth, life is still. It isn’t in need of capturing. I like it better.
—  an excerpt from a book i’ll never write #330
beach fossil collection rules

Not official rules but almost rituals that I’ve developed for beach days:

Take what is offered and in plain view to sharp eyes, don’t get greedy and search mechanically. I often find more just by walking and paying attention to the tide line and what each wave reveals than by trying to dig and sift. Think of them as gifts and not things of monetary value to be mined. 

Listen to your intuition. Often it tells me when it’s time to move on from a spot if I am stationary too long, or leads me in a certain direction where something is waiting for me to find it.

When tired, sit. Many times I’ll take a break and sit in the sand, only to reveal some fossils that I’m almost sitting on when I get comfortable. 

Go for it. Triangular rocks and wet pieces of wood are tricksters, but sometimes the effort of bending down to see if they are anything will reveal a fossil next to it that you didn’t see while standing. 

Payment. Pick up trash to dispose of, especially anything dangerous. Fishing line or sharp pieces of glass are easy to tuck in a backpack pocket to carry back. Nature is giving you gifts, give something back by putting things to rights. Usually at the end of the day I pick up larger trash as I’m leaving. 

Imagine having a family with Pope that Smurf and the guys don’t know about

“I swear these kids are gonna be the death of me,” you said flopping down on the beach blanket beside Andrew. He was watching them intently, so you felt you could take a small break and relax in the shade.

“That’s my girls,” Pope mumbled with a chuckle.

You glanced at the girls trying to figure out what he was talking about. Seeing them wrestling right on the tide line sent you into a slight panic.

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