tiber

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Bridge of Angels by Ines Perkovic

My favourite part of skyrim was where after you fight the dragon at the watchtower and the guards are all talking, the one guard says something about you being dragonborn like tiber septim and then the beautiful 

“I never heard of Tiber Septim killing dragons”

“That’s because there weren’t any then, idiot

that’s just like. a classic 3rd grade classroom smackdown

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The Vatican, the bridge of Angels and the seagull by Babis Kavvadias

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Gemini Altar (Altar of the twins)

Ostia, Italy

0.84 x 0.84 m ,  1.10 m high

First day of October, 124 CE


A container for offerings or a statue was fastened on top with lead (the altar is explicitly called “altar” in an inscription, but it may have been re-used as a statue-base). The four corners are decorated with ram’s heads and wreaths. The front has a depiction of Mars, Venus (with goose and Amor), and Hymenaeus (the god of marriage). On the back we see Romulus and Remus, suckled by the she-wolf. They are found by two shepherds, Faustulus and Faustinus. This story is situated near the Palatine (the Lupercal), and the personification of the hill can be seen in the upper left part. In the lower right part is the personification of the Tiber. Jupiter’s eagle is present as well. On the sides of the altar are amorini, hauling the weapons and chariot of Mars. The amorini are moving towards the front side of the altar.

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Sant'Angelo Bridge by Scott Sherrill-Mix

Ponte Sant'Angelo | (Where is this?)

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Chased gold presentation box - Peter Russell (box) and George Michael Moser (chased decoration), 1741.

The scene on the top of the box (second photo) depicts Gaius Mucius Scaevola standing before the Etruscan king Lars Porsena after his failed attempt to assassinate him, thrusting his hand into the fire to show Porsena the resolve of the Romans to resist the Etruscan siege. On the bottom of the box (third photo) Romulus and Remus suckle their wolf foster-mother beside a god representing the Tiber.

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Extremely Rare Coin of the Roman Emperor Galba

This bronze sestertius, has the emperor’s name, IMP SER GALBA  and the date, AVG TR P (June 68) around the oak-wreathed and draped bust of Galba. The reverse has the image of Victory alighting, holding a wreath in her right hand and a palm branch over her left shoulder with the letters S – C on either side of her. Extremely rare and among the finest sestertii of Galba in existence. A magnificent portrait of great strength in the finest style of the period. A wonderful untouched brown-Tiber tone and extremely fine. Sold at auction for 112,675 USD.

The portrait on this fine sestertius of Galba, who ruled for only 7 months between 68 and 69 AD, is of extraordinary quality by a master-engraver, depicting the elderly emperor as a stern aristocrat of raw virtue. His expression is set in grim determination, and the oak-wreath resting on his head is so carefully articulated that the whole appears remarkably life-like. Contrasting with the depth of realism seldom reached in Roman numismatics of the obverse, the figure of Victory on the reverse, with her soft, youthful contours, is one imbued with a hopeful spirit.

However noble the message of the reverse of this coin, Tacitus records that Galba was only worthy of the empire before becoming emperor. His shortcomings were his severity and stinginess. While the latter was perhaps a legitimate ‘vice’ considering Nero’s carefree spending on frivolous projects which had depleted the Roman treasury and which caused Galba to levy enormous taxes on those areas of the empire that had been slow to receive him, he also refused most requests for citizenship out-of-hand, however well deserved, and had a number of men sentenced to death without trial. Additionally, he soon came under the control of his co-consul, the praetorian prefect, and a freedman, which further eroded his popularity.

His death sentence, however, were his refusals to honor the reward promised on his behalf to the praetorians for their defection of Nero during his long march on Rome, and his spurning of the loyal Otho for Piso as his successor. Galba rightly felt that soldiers should not be bribed, but the rot that had begun when Claudius paid the guardsmen after his elevation had been long established by the late 60s, and the praetorians turned against their emperor, hailing Otho emperor on 15 January AD 69. Galba was executed and decapitated by praetorians near Lacus Curtius, the mysterious open chasm near the Roman Forum.