thurston-high-school

School/University Shooter Voices
  • School/University Shooter Voices
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Audio recordings of various school or university shooters. Note: Elliot Rodger isn’t necessarily a school/university shooter, as his attack was only on the campus, and three of his victims were stabbed to death, not shot.  Still fits into the theme, in my opinion.

In chronological order: Kip Kinkel (1998) - Dylan Klebold (†1999) - Eric Harris (†1999) - Seung-hui Cho (†2007) - Pekka-Eric Auvinen (†2007) - TJ Lane (2012) - Adam Lanza (†2012) - Elliot Rodger (†2014) - Dylann Roof (2015)

Kip Kinkel about his parents
  • Kip Kinkel about his parents
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The interrogation of Kip Kinkel on May 21, 1998. I compiled the parts where he talks about his motive to murder his parents (William Kinkel and Faith Zuranski), his relationship to them and what he was feeling when he killed them. For a better understanding of this, he killed his father first, not in a fight, after the fight, when his father was in the kitchen drinking something. When his mother came home, he killed her too. The next day, he shot up his high school.

- Detective: Okay….So was your dad…Did he hit you or anything like that?
Kip Kinkel: No.
Detective: Okay…Was he yelling or out of control or?
Kip Kinkel: I couldn’t, I couldn’t, I had no other choice. God.

- Kip Kinkel: I loved my dad that’s why I had to
Detective: You love him, so that’s why you had to kill him?
Kip Kinkel: Yes.

- Kip Kinkel: Oh my God, my parents were good people, I’m just so fucked up in the head, I don’t know why.

- Detective: Do you say anything to her? 
Kip Kinkel: Yes, I told her I loved her.
Detective: And then you shot her. 
Kip Kinkel: Yes. God damn it, these voices inside my head.

- Kip Kinkel: She was still alive and I said that I loved her and I shot her…I shot her again, so she wouldn’t know that I killed her. I loved my mom.

- Detective: Now you shot your mom to save her the embarrassment and that sort of stuff, right?
Kip Kinkel: Yes.
Detective: Okay. Was that the right thing or the wrong thing to do?
Kip Kinkel: I couldn’t do anything else.

- Kip Kinkel: My dad kept saying how my mom…how embarrassed she was going to be and how horrible I was and I couldn’t let my mom feel like that. I couldn’t do anything else. There’s no other way.

Kip Kinkel’s Hallucinations and Delusions

Kip reported that he began hearing voices when he was in sixth grade. The first time he heard a voice it told him, ‘You need to kill everyone, everyone in the world.’ It also told him, ‘You are a stupid piece of shit. You are’t worth anything.’ Thus, from the onset of his psychosis, Kip heard voices that urged him toward both homicide and suicide.

When asked where the voices came from, Kip had a couple of ideas. One idea was that he was hearing the devil. Another, was that the government might have put a computer chip in his head, with satellites transmitting messages to the chip.

Kip went on the describe three different voices: A, B and C. The ‘A voice’ was loud and authoritarian and told him what to do. The ‘B voice’ made derogatory statements to him. The ‘C voice’ repeated what the other two said or commentated on them. Sometimes he heard the voices talking to each other about him. Kip tried a variety of things to make the voices stop, including exercise, watching television, and punching himself in the head. After he was arrested and was giving his confession, he cried out about the voices and began banging his head against the wall.

Less than a month before the attack, Kip yelled in class, ‘God damn this voice inside my head.’ He was cited for misbehaviour, and a disciplinary form that quoted his outburst was sent home and signed by his mother. When his teacher asked Kip if he was really hearing voices, Kip denied it. He was painfully aware that being ‘crazy’ would lead to ostracism at school and be a major disappointment to his parents. Thus, his fear of being labelled as crazy prevented him from getting the help he desperately needed.

Kip’s delusions included paranoia that China was going to invade the US. In preparation for this, Kip had built bombs and stockpiled guns. Kip said about China: ‘They are so huge. They have nuclear weapons. Seemed like I would end up fighting them. I had lots of fantasies about fighting the Chinese.’ Another of Kip’s obsessions was his fear that the world was about to experience a plague. He feared the end of the world and the falling apart of society. He wanted to build a bomb shelter and accumulate food and supplies. Kip also believed that Disney was taking over the world and would replace the American dollar with the Disney dollar, featuring a picture of Mickey Mouse. In talking about Disney, Kip told Dr Bolstad, ‘No one of average intelligence sees it with Disney. You have to be smarter.’

Kip had other delusions. He said that sex criminals had chips put in them. He seemed to think that the television show The X Files indicated that the government was experimenting with putting chips in people. He said the chips could produce voices, adding, ‘Maybe that’s the way they’re controlling me.’ After the attack, Kip continued to be paranoid. Dr William Sack, a psychiatrist who worked with Kip in prison, reported that Kip thought visitors might have cameras in their glasses. He was also afraid his medication might be poisoned.

Besides auditory hallucinations, Kip may have also experiences visual ones. He told strange stories about a man who allegedly lived nearby and drove a car with bullet holes in it. Kip was so afraid of him that he said he bought a stolen gun because he needed protection in case the man came after him. It is not clear if Kip was paranoid about a real man who lived nearby, or if he was having visual hallucinations.

Adapted from ‘Why Kids Kill’ by Peter Langman

KIP KINKEL’S THERAPY NOTES

January 20, 1997

Kip is a fourteen-year-old boy with brown hair and blue eyes. He was adequately groomed and casually dressed in a green sweatshirt, black corduroy pants and a black leather jacket. He was oriented as to person, place and time with no evidence of delusional thinking or other thought disorder symptoms. His attention and concentration were adequate for interview purposes. His speech was logical, coherent and goal-directed He was initially sullen but became more cooperative as the interview progressed. He became tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. He reported his mother views him as a “good kid with some bad habits” while his father sees him as “a bad kid with bad habits.” He feels his father expects the worst from him and was not supportive of counseling because of the expense and his belief that it will not be helpful. Kip reported he often feels angry but does not know why he feels this emotion. Kip reported he makes explosives from gasoline and other household items and detonates them at a nearby quarry to vent feelings of anger. He denies intent to harm people or property. If he has a “bad day” at school, he feels better after detonating an explosive. I cautioned Kip that gasoline is very dangerous and advised he not use it for such purposes. When asked with whom he can talk about personal issues he identified his friends and, to a lesser degree, his mother. He cannot discuss his feelings with his father for fear he will become angry with him. He feels he has little in common with his parents and finds talking to them difficult. He is receptive to ongoing therapy. Occasionally tearful when discussing his relationship with his father. Kip is very angry and vents this anger by antisocial acting-out and detonating explosives. He is at risk for accidentally harming himself or others with explosives. He is also high risk for continued antisocial behavior. He is angry toward his father whom he regards as very critical of him and has inadequate strategies for venting this anger. A See in one week with a focus on appropriate strategies for managing anger and improving communication between Kip and his parents.

January 27, 1997

Good week. Temper under good control. Bill making a strong effort to be more positive with Kip and they had a good talk yesterday. No further use of explosives or playing with weapons. Feels less angry and is pleased with his father’s efforts. Less angry and less depressed. See in three weeks.

February 26, 1997

Faith reports Kip is doing very well. Kip is feeling less angry and recently achieved a 104% in math class. He met with Dr. Crumbley this morning who assigned thirty-two hours of community service will require he write an apology letter to owner of car he hit with a rock and pay for damage to car ($50.00). No prosecution planned though, if he is arrested within six months, he will be prosecuted for this event and the rock throwing Faith feels Bill is making an effort to be more positive with Kip though he sometimes continues to add a negative comment after praising Kip. Kip predicts he will be able to stay out of trouble in the future. He is not practicing specific techniques for managing anger Suggested he consider riding his bike, running, shooting baskets or tearing old magazines(old phone books or newspapers) when angry.  Good effort by Kip to manage anger. He continues to feel depressed several days per week but denies suicidal ideation.

April 30, 1997

Kip and Faith in. Kip angry and upset about two suspensions in the past week. Last week he was suspended for two days for kicking a peer in the head after this boy has shoved him. Kip is angry that the other boy, who started the altercation, was not punished. Yesterday, Kip was suspended for three days for throwing a pencil at another boy. The teacher, Mr. Boom, saw this as an assault, therefore the three-day suspension. Both Kip and Faith have questions about how these incidents were handled by school personnel. Recommended parents consult with school officials, perhaps  Mr. Nelson, to inform them of how much progress Kip has made and show them the excellent grades and positive teacher comments from this past term. Kip may have overreacted but feels unfairly treated by school officials. It is important he feels supported by his parents and that school personnel acknowledge his improved behavior and performance.

June 02, 1997

Behavior under good control but his mother is concerned he seems too cynical and disinterested in participating in Summer camps. His father continues to make a strong effort to reach-out to Kip and to be positive with him. Discussion with Faith about possible use of antidepressants. She agrees Kip is having ongoing difficulty with depression symptoms and is receptive to considering a trial of an antidepressant. Kip reports, “Eating is like a chore.” He complains that food doesn’t taste good. He often feels bored and in irritable. He feels tired upon awakening most mornings. He reports there is nothing to which he is looking forward. He denies suicidal ideation, intent or plan of action.

June 18, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Dr. Geisler started him on Prozac 20 mg. A.M. twelve days ago. He is sleeping better and there have been no temper outbursts. Kip is taking the Prozac as prescribed and reports no side-effects. His father is making a good effort to spend time with him and Kip is pleased with this change. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed though it is certainly too early to assess the usefulness of the Prozac. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 09, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Faith in with Kip. He missed two days of Prozac while camping with friends but is generally taking it as prescribed. She reports he is less irritable and generally in a better mood with no temper outbursts. His energy remains low but he is sleeping well and his appetite is normal. He is getting long well with his parents and his father continues to make efforts to spend time with him. ASSESSMENT: Kip appears less depressed and is generally doing well. PLAN: See in three weeks.

July 30, 1997

PROBLEM: Depression. DATA: Kip continues to do well. He is taking Prozac 20 mg. A.M. daily with no sideeffects. He does not appear depressed and denies depression symptoms. His mother reports his moods have generally been quite good. He recently returned from a family reunion in San Diego and was very well behaved and seemed to have a good time.

This photo physically hurts me. It was taken by Detective Al Warthen after the shooting at Thurston high school. You can see the pain in his eyes and all the hate he has for himself. He taped this bullet to his chest to reload his gun then kill himself, you can also see the level of regret he has for not doing this. I still find it so hard to believe that Kip was found sane.

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Prior to his arrest for the murder of 4 and attempted murder of more than 20, Kip Kinkel had run into trouble with the school and the law several times before.

  • In seventh grade, Kip and some of his friends mail ordered bomb making books, such as The Anarchist Cookbook, over the school computers. They were caught.
  • In eighth grade, Kip and his friends were caught stealing CDs from Target.
  • On 7 January, 1997, Kip went on a snowboarding trip with a friend. The two threw rocks from a highway overpass, and one rock hit a passing car. When Kip was arrested, he started crying and asked if anyone was hurt. Because of this incident, he was sent to a psychologist.
  • In April 1997, Kip was suspended twice. Once for kicking another student, with whom he had gotten into a fight, in the head, applying his karate skills, and once for throwing a pencil at a student.

Over the summer of 1997, Kip was on Prozac. His psychologist noted that he slept better and his anger outbursts had lessened. His parents thought that this improvement meant that he should be taken off the medication.

  • In May 1998, Kip and some of his friends “tp”ed a house, using more than 400 rolls of toilet paper, and therefore reaching their goal of breaking the school record. However, they were caught and Kip was grounded.
  • On 20 May, 1998, his friend Korey sold Kip a stolen pistol from another friend’s father. The father called the police, reported that his gun must have been stolen and gave the police a list of names of his son’s friends who could have done it. Kip and Korey were arrested a few hours later.

That same day, Kip Kinkel killed his parents.

The Thurston High School shooting took place on May 21, 1998. Expelled student Kip Kinkel first murdered his parents before engaging in a school shooting at Thurston High School  in Springfield,Oregon that left two students dead and 25 others wounded.Though he was 15, Kinkel was certified to be tried as an adult. He’d initiated an insanity defense, but dropped it and pled guilty to four counts of first-degree murder and twenty-five counts of attempted murder. He is serving a 111-year sentence without the possibility of parole.

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On May 21, 1998 15-year-old Kip Kinkel first murdered his parents before opening fire at Thurston High School, killing 4 and injuring 25. However, long before the shooting, Kinkel had been obsessed with guns and the idea of violence. The future killer frequently bragged about building explosives, and even lectured his literature class on how to make a pipe bomb. Kinkel also boasted about how he would torture animals, claiming that he would stick firecrackers in cats’ mouths and skin squirrels alive. Once, Kinkel also said that he had blown up a cow. The boy’s parents took him to anger management classes, hoping their son’s behavior would improve. At one point, Kip asked for a gun, and his father bought him a .22 caliber rifle, hoping that if he took him to a shooting range and let him use it there, it would help control his obsessions. Kip’s father later boasted to a tennis partner that he was “pleased with Kip’s progress.” When Kip became suspended and faced expulsion for having a stolen .32 caliber pistol in his school locker, his father still stayed hopeful, and was “surprisingly upbeat” about trying to work out the situation with his son. Little did he know that just hours later, he would be dead at the hands of Kip.