thrush

On longer evenings,
Light, chill and yellow,
Bathes the serene
Foreheads of houses.
A thrush sings,
Laurel-surrounded
In the deep bare garden,
Its fresh-peeled voice
Astonishing the brickwork.
It will be spring soon –
And I, whose childhood
Is a forgotten boredom,
Feel like a child
Who comes on a scene
Of adult reconciling,
And can understand nothing
But the unusual laughter,
And starts to be happy.

Philip Larkin, “Coming”

February 25, 2017 - Black-breasted Thrush (Turdus dissimilis)

These thrushes are found in parts of South and Southeast Asia. They eat insects, mollusks, and berries, foraging mostly on the ground and sometimes in trees. During the breeding season, which varies in different parts of their range, they build sturdy cup nests from green moss and fibers, usually in trees or shrubs, but sometimes on the ground. They were once grouped with the Grey-backed Thrush as a single species and the two may form a superspecies along with the Tickell’s Thrush.

“An English Song Thrush.-A queer nesting place.” from Young Days: Plays and Ways of Little Ones at Home, with Instructive Stories. Fully Illustrated. Boston: D. Lothrop and Company, 1884.

March 10, 2017 - Green Cochoa (Cochoa viridis)

These thrushes are found in parts of the Himalayas, India, southern and eastern China, and northern Southeast Asia. Usually foraging in pairs or small groups, they eat berries, insects, and mollusks. They have been observed beating snails against rocks to break their shells. Their nests are shallow cups built in tree forks from twigs, roots, and moss.