three dimensional space

Somebody Else (3D Audio)
the 1975
Somebody Else (3D Audio)

somebody else (live in studio) - the 1975

to listen properly:

put on headphones

close your eyes

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

oh ms believer (3d audio)
twenty one pilots
oh ms believer (3d audio)

oh ms believer (3D audio) // twenty one pilots

to listen properly:

-put on headphones

-close your eyes

-enjoy

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. this frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

listen to the original (x)

anonymous asked:

Good morning. I noticed that Harry's album was recorded with split audio - different audio in the left and right. Sorry, I don't know the technical term for it. I know this was very common in the 60s & 70s, so not surprising he would use the technique, but it it used commonly now it is this unique for the time? Thank you for your insight. 💖

Hi!

I haven’t had the chance to listen carefully with headphones, so I can’t tell you what I hear on specific songs, but here’s a brief answer, and I will come back again once I’ve heard the songs on headphones.

So, in audiophile terms (at least from my limited knowledge), the reason for splitting the sound between right and left is to image the sound.

High fidelity equipment, with high fidelity audio playback equipment, needs to have the proper room diffusing/ insulation and the proper speaker placements. When one plays the music recorded in a live venue, and with split audio, one can hear the music as if it’s being played in a three-dimensional space. The physics take a bit of time to explain, but it has to do with the pure diffusion of sound from dipole speakers and the way sound waves propagate and cancel each other out in an insulated space. When you go to concert halls and see baffles hung from the ceiling or walls, they are diffusing the sound.

You can actually hear where each musician is standing in the room, like ghost images. Harry in front, guitarist to the right, drummer in back and so forth.

It’s actually eerie to hear music played back like that– like you are in the room with the musicians. It’s a sound hologram– almost as if you can touch them.

Pop is almost NEVER recorded like this. First, the voices are often recorded on a separate track, tuned and then mixed back with the instrumentals. Second, pop uses a lot of electronic effects that are not recorded acoustically but are produced digitally. EDM is almost all digital sound effects. Digitally recorded sound are not placeable, because it isn’t mic’d and doesn’t obey the physics of sound. Listen to any 1980’s Madonna recording and you’ll hear how flat it is.

Jazz is almost always recorded like this. Jazz is recorded as an acoustic ensemble with usually two or three microphones, and imaging can be amazing.

Imaging is best with music that uses little electronic processing– songs with acoustic guitars will image better than songs with electric guitars, for instance.

To get the best sound, you want the best recording medium.

Audiophiles argue, but it’s now agreed that SACDs (high memory capacity CDs) have the same ability to capture high fidelity sound as vinyl. But for decades, vinyl was the medium of choice because most CDs compressed sound (to fit data onto discs). There’s also something about vinyl sound that is warmer and rounder than digital sound, although I’ve done a few blinded hearing tests with high fidelity equipment that showed no difference to me.

If you have the luxury of a high fidelity system, play your vinyl record, and then find the sweet spot to sit and listen (usually in a room, there is only one sweet spot). Again, this is my limited experience.

One way you can do this is to bring your CD or vinyl to a store that sells hi fi equipment– find a store in a big city that has an insulated auditioning room with speakers that cost $10,000 per pair and up. That’s the kind of snobby, esoteric store you want. They will have a system that costs over $50k, and then you can ask to pop in your Pink Album (these stores sell $3k CD players and turntables with cartridges that cost more than $3k, so your CD or vinyl will be well cared for). These rooms sound as if you’re dead, because you literally cannot hear any echoes. The sales people are usually pretty nice. Ask to sit or stand in the sweet spot; they’ll know what you’re talking about. Then enjoy to your heart’s content. You might have the perfect listening experience, Harry and his band playing for you in a private performance, close enough to touch.

Addendum: I will add if I hear specific details about the songs. A friend told me that “From the Dining Table” has Harry singing from two different locations, right and left. I’ll have to listen for the artistic reason for this choice. Thanks.

ziggy9911  asked:

Just curious on how you approach composition and perspective. I feel as if sometimes I think too hard, not really about what to draw but how to draw it and make it look interesting. The comic panels you have been doing are amazing. Any tips/references on improving my knowledge of composition and perspective? What do you think about as you lay your pencil on the drawing paper? what goes through your mind?

*STANDARD DISCLAIMER* I’m not handing down life lessons or trying to assert that there’s a ‘correct way’ to draw. I’m just trying to make perspective more approachable for thems that want to tackle it.

Okay. Let’s do this.

1. Understand what perspective is and what it’s for. Stay away from rulers while you get comfortable.

Everyone struggles with perspective because 1. it’s not well or widely taught and 2. artists tend to see linear perspective as a set of rules rather than a set of tools.

Linear perspective is a TOOL we use to create and depict SPACE. That’s it. That’s all it is. Your goal is not to draw in ‘accurate linear perspective.’ Stay away from the ruler and precision for as long as you can. Your goal is to create the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Perspective is just a tool to help you construct and correct that space.

2. Know in your bones that you can ONLY learn to draw in perspective through physical practice. There is no other way.

Grab some paper and draw with me. If you match me drawing for drawing you will be more fluent in linear perspective and spatial drawing by the end of this post. Unfortunately if you don’t, you won’t be.

3. Sketch around in rough perspective. NO RULERS.

So let’s make some simple space. let’s start with a two dimensional surface…

K. We have a flat, 2D surface. Let’s create some depth by putting a vanishing point in the middle, and having parallel lines converge towards it. Make a gridded plane inside that space.

Good. Let’s make that space meaningful by adding a dude and a road or something. (Again, parallel ‘depth lines’ will converge into the vanishing point along the horizon)

And now we have the rough illusion of some space. I didn’t use any rulers, and it’s not perfectly accurate, but we got our depth from that vanishing point right in the middle of the page. And since we have a little dude in there, we’ve got human scale, which allows us to gauge the size of the space we’ve created. Gives it meaning.

You need people or cars or some recognizable, human-scale THING in there as a frame of reference or your space won’t mean much to your viewer. Watch. We can make that same basic space a whole lot bigger like this:

Same vanishing point in the same place, completely different scale, and a totally different feeling of space. Cool, right?

3. Sketch around in rough perspective MORE. STAY LOOSE.

See what sort of spaces and feelings you can create with vanishing points and gridded planes on a post-it or something. Super small, super rough. Feel it out. Pick a vanishing point or lay out a grid in perspective, and MAKE SOME SPACE. Do it. Draw, I don’t know, a lady and her dog in a desert. I’ll do it, too.

Good job. LOOK AT YOU creating the illusion of space! This is how you’ll thumbnail and plan anything you want to draw in space. All of my drawings start this way. I think about how I want the viewer to feel and then play around with space and composition until I find something that works.

Once you have a sketch you like, and space that you feel, THEN you can take out the ruler and make it more accurate and convincing.

4. Draw environments from life.

I cannot stress this enough. Draw the world around you, try to draw the shapes and angles as you see them, and you will ‘get’ how and why perspective is used. Use something permanent so that you’ll move fast and commit. I usually use black prismacolor pencil.

You’ll learn or reinforce something with every drawing. I learned a lot about multiple vanishing points from this drawing:

Learned from the receding, winding space I tired to draw here:

Layered, interior spaces:

You get the idea.

Life drawing will also help you develop your own shorthand and language for depicting textures, materials, details, natural and architectural features, etc. Do it. Do it all the time. Go to pretty or interesting places just to draw them.

Take a second and just draw a quick sketch of whatever room you’re in.

5. Perspective in formal Illustration: apply what you’ve learned.

1. I always start with research. For this particular location I looked at Angkor Wat.

2. Once I had enough reference, I did a bunch of little thumbnail sketches with a very loose sense of space and picked the one I liked best.

3. Scanned the thumbnail and drew a little more clearly over it. Worked out the rough space before using formal perspective.

4. Reinforced the space with formal perspective. I dropped in pre-made vanishing points over my drawing. If I were drawing in real media here’s where I’d get out the ruler to sketch in some accurate space.

5. Drew the damn thing. Because I do my research, draw from life, and am comfortable drawing in perspective, I can wing it. I just sort of ‘build’ the ruins freehand in the space I’ve established, keeping it more or less accurate, experimenting and playing with details along the way. I erase a lot, too, both in PS and when drawing in pencil. Keeps it fun for me.

And that’s what I know about composition and perspective. If you want more formal instruction on perspective and it’s uses, you can use John Buscema’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way. Or If you want to get really intense about it, Andrew Loomis can help you.

-Jake Wyatt

The Beach (3D Audio)
The Neighbourhood
The Beach (3D Audio)

the beach (live) - the neighbourhood

to listen properly:

put on headphones

close your eyes

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

ghost (3d audio)
halsey
ghost (3d audio)

ghost (3D audio+empty arena) // halsey

to listen properly:

-put on headphones

-close your eyes

-enjoy

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. this frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

listen to the original (x)

diseonfire  asked:

If you had a stranded alien stuck on Earth in First Contact l scenario, who is sick or appears unwell (e.g. trauma injuries, unsteadiness, lethargy), would you think it better to try your chances with a doctor or the local vet? As a modern vet, if you were presented with an alien patient you up until that moment couldn't fathom existing, what would be the first steps you would take in trying to treat them quickly and with reasonable secrecy?

There are a few things to consider when choosing either a vet clinic or the doctor’s office for your extra-terrestrial visitor.

A vet clinic might:

  • Be set up for smaller than human or larger than human sized patients
  • May have facilities for ‘exotic’ patients, i.e. non-mammals
  • Usually has a surgical suite, Xray, blood/urine analyzers and sometimes ultrasound on-site
  • Has medications on site, and a wide variety
  • Usually a non-specialist, generalist type clinic for their type of species.
  • Is set up to admit and hospitalize their patients.
  • May have a portable ‘home-visit kit’ already packed with lots of stuff
  • Is usually not staffed 24 hours.
  • Staff are used to dealing with uncommunicative and uncooperative patients

A doctor’s office:

  • Has almost zero medications on site, mostly vaccines
  • Only basic equipment
  • Is set up for only one species
  • Is not set up to hospitalize patients
  • Often refer elsewhere for imaging, blood tests, etc.

A human hospital:

  • has very nice surgical suites for human-sized patients
  • An extensive pharmacy
  • lots of entries and exits
  • Lots of people/witnesses
  • staffed 24 hours
  • security cameras
  • Long distances between different facilities, eg Xray, blood analyzers, treatment rooms.

So if you want to be secretive and have as few people know about your alien as possible, choose the vet clinic. If your alien is not really human shaped, chose a vet clinic. If you want as much stuff in one place as possible, use a vet clinic.

Couldn’t fathom existing? My friend I think you underestimate just how many of us are sci-fi nerds. Does it exist in three dimensional space and is it made of matter? If yes, let’s give this a go!

For how I, or most vets, would approach a species of which we have no prior knowledge and no published knowledge is available, the thought process would look a lot like this post: First Principles.

As for ‘treating in secrecy’, depends on how sick or injured they are. If they’re not too bad, then bringing equipment to them might be the more prudent thing to do. If they are severely unwell, bringing them to the clinic at night (on on a public holiday) might be more effective, but you then need to move the cars so the general public doesn’t think anyone is there. I have frequently been stuck at the clinic when it is closed, feeding boarding cats or treating a patient, when somebody knocks on the door looking for pet food, just on the off chance we were open.

Clinics with security cameras may be an issue. More and more clinics these days have an alarm, but not every camera system will be monitored all the time.

Treating in the clinic is risky if more than one person has keys, but unless they see horses the Xray machine wont be portable, and who knows which car that might have been left in. Some ultrasound machines are portable with power. You may be able to bring some fluids back for analysis, though it’s anybody’s guess how useful that may be.

You can take a whole load of stuff to set up a makeshift hospital in someone’s house, providing you have a relatively cooperative patient. There’s less risk of an accidental observer on private property, but you are more limited in what you can do. The anesthetic machine and gas bottles are not portable, and expensive equipment will be quickly missed on days the clinic is open.

Some clinics, particularly mixed animal practices with branch clinics or a home visit component, will equip their vets with work vehicles which contain a huge variety of basic stuff for any potential call out, just not huge amounts of anything, nothing that needs refrigeration and no controlled drugs.

It’s worth mentioning that any clued in veterinarian treating an alien species is going to have two particular concerns sooner or later:

  • What diseases can I catch from this alien?
  • Is this the start of a world wide epidemic?

The thought will occur that maybe they should be recording or reporting this alien. At the least they will record what treatments have been used, what worked and what didn’t. This is part of medical record keeping and you need to know what you’ve already used to figure things out. It may be recorded as “Treatment for Squiddy the dog” instead of “Treatment for alien”. The knowledge may be useful at some point in the future, and at the very least helps prevent repeating mistakes.

A veterinarian may also decide to report this to the government. This is complicated and personal, and will depend on your character but it will boil down to “Obligation to the protection of Earth” versus “Obligation to your patient.“ How they resolve this conflict is up to you as the author. 

We Don't Believe What's On TV (3D Audio)
twenty one pilots
We Don't Believe What's On TV (3D Audio)

we don’t believe what’s on tv (acoustic) - twenty one pilots

to listen properly:

put on headphones

close your eyes

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

anonymous asked:

Hi, huge fan of your works! Do you have animation tips for noobs/beginners interested in going for animation?

Hi!!

So I’m no expert myself in animation, but I can definitely give you some tips I learned in school, as well as some of my drawing techniques.

Also keep in mind I’m speaking from a strictly 2D perspective, since I don’t have any experience with 3D animation.

Keep reading

Antichrist
The 1975
Antichrist

The Antichrist by The 1975 with audio echo and 3d sound!!!

WHAT IS 3D AUDIO?

It is a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by headphones/speakers. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

TO LISTEN:

- close your eyes

- wear headphones!

Heathens (3D Audio)
twenty one pilots
Heathens (3D Audio)

heathens (3d audio) - twenty one pilots

to listen properly:

put on headphones

close your eyes

what is 3D audio?

3D audio effects are a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by stereo speakers, surround-sound speakers, speaker-arrays, or headphones. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener.

dreamhopewonder  asked:

When coloring a figure/face/object, how do you know what to shade darker and what to shade lighter (shadows and such)? How do you know what to leave lighter and what to leave darker when it comes to shading with light sources?

To be able to shade something, you first need to understand how light behaves, and you also need to think of the thing you are drawing as being a 3D object.

First, lets talk about how light works. Here we have a light-bulb,

Light spreads out from this light-bulb in lots of little rays that travel in straight lines. They start out with lots of energy and brightness, and then the further they travel, the weaker they get until it gets dark again.

So closer to the light source, the stronger the light will be. Now, if we stick something solid in the way of these light rays,

then the light cannot pass, and you get a shadow.

-

Now lets talk about the object itself. When something is facing a light source straight on, it’ll be fully lit

But then as it begins to turn away from the light source, the intensity of the light will diminish.

and the further it turns, the harder it will be for the light to reach it

Until eventually it’ll face away from the light source completely and it will not be lit at all!

-

Now lets move into a three dimensional space instead of a flat diagram. We’ll start out with a cube,

If we put in a light source, the light rays will travel in a straight line and be able to reach some faces of the cube, and not others.

if I add in those rays, can you see how parts of the cube will be lit, but not others?

You can then move the light source around, and different parts of the cube will be lit

The different sides are like that flat plane from before, when the face of the cube is facing the light source, it is fully lit. Then, as the faces angle away from the light, it gets harder for the light to reach it, until it becomes fully shadowed.

It’s a good idea to draw a little x on your page so that you know where the light is coming from!

-

Now, if we take something like a sphere, it becomes a little trickier because there are no clear sides, right?

Well, I’d suggest thinking of them like a football:

Lots of little flat sides slotted together to make one round shape, kinda like a low-poly 3D model!

And then you can think of things as little planes again, all facing the light source to different degrees

Then you can smoothen them away to make it round

You can break anything down into planes, including the face. In fact, you can buy a model that does exactly this!:

but it’s awfully expensive, so thankfully there are plenty of photos of them online for you to look at

(https://warosu.org/data/ic/img/0016/87/1395670599047.jpg)

(http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2010/210/b/4/Face_planes_reference_by_artofpros.jpg)

Happy Little Pill (3d Audio)
Troye Sivan
Happy Little Pill (3d Audio)

Happy Little Pill (3d Audio) by Troye Sivan

WHAT IS 3D AUDIO?

~ It is a group of sound effects that manipulate the sound produced by headphones/speakers. This frequently involves the virtual placement of sound sources anywhere in three-dimensional space, including behind, above or below the listener. BASICALLY, I layered the track and started one milliseconds before the other then made it slightly louder. BOOM.

TO LISTEN:

~ Wear headphones and close your eyes!

℗ 2014 EMI Recorded Music Australia Pty Ltd a division of Universal Music Australia Pty Ltd

Tutorial #7: Character Turnaround Sheet

A turnaround model sheet of your character can be a very useful tool. Animators and comic artists use turnaround model sheets to help them stay on-model as they draw characters from different angles and in varying poses. You can also use your turnaround sheet as a reference to create a maquette of your character.

Materials

  • pencil
  • paper
  • ruler
  • tracing paper (optional)
  • scanner/printer (optional)
  • Photoshop (optional)


Step 1

Once you’ve chosen a character you want to use, draw them in a front, three-quarter and side/profile view. You should choose a pose that conveys your character’s personality. For example, if your character is shy, you could draw them slightly hunched over, with their knees bent and pigeon-toed, as if they’re trying to hide themselves from the outside world.

I prefer to use relatively simple poses that will allow me to see the character’s body from all angles. You’re free to draw them in as dynamic a pose as you want. Just remember that you’ll be drawing this pose from various angles!

I started by loosely drawing the front, three-quarter and side/profile view free hand.

Tom Bancroft, author of Creating Characters With Personality, suggests you draw these three poses free hand, without restricting them to fit within a certain height. You can make adjustments later, to make your lineup cohesive. Avoiding restrictions at this point will allow you to experiment freely to find the strongest poses to use.

However, for the sake of cohesion, I suggest you try to keep the proportions relatively close to each other. For example, try to keep the eyes, nose, and mouth at around the same height within the face in each pose, the hands and clothes at about the same length, the hair within the same size, etc.  


Step 2

Tighten your sketches a little bit more, taking into consideration the structure of your character and their geometric build up. This will help you maintain the shapes cohesive as they turn in space. (i.e. oval head, cylindrical legs and arms, cone torso, etc.)

I focused on strengthening the structure of the character and tried to keep it cohesive throughout by basing my second round of sketches on geometric structures (you can omit the character’s arm in profile view to allow a better view of the torso).

I used tracing paper over my original sketches to define the geometric buildup. I then tightened my sketches basing the form on the geometric structures I defined. Note that at this point I added more detail to the outline and structure of the face in particular.

It’s important to keep human anatomy in mind when you begin to define your character’s silhouette in three-quarter and profile view. You might want to look up references as you work, use a mirror or ask a friend to pose for you.

Keep in mind that foreheads, noses and chins often protrude noticeably, as well as the back of the head. These are key in creating an appealing and believable head shape. Eyes rest within eye sockets, which will make them much less visible in profile view. Try to visualize your character’s form in three dimensional space as you draw. Think of the volume of the shapes and how they would look from a particular angle.

Flat shapes are boring and do little to create the illusion of volume in a drawing. Take care to create variation within your character’s silhouette. Even if your character is skinny, their body will have mass and volume. Use this opportunity to really try to understand the way your design would work in three dimensional space.


Step 3

To create the back and back three-quarter views, take your front and three-quarter views and flip them horizontally to use as a reference. I scanned mine and flipped them in Photoshop. If you don’t have access to these, you could use tracing paper or a light box or draw them free hand.

  • Tracing paper: trace your sketches, then turn the sheet upside down for the flipped version.
  • Light box: place your sketch upside down on the light box to get the flipped version.

Place tracing paper over your flipped sketches and draw the back view of each pose.

I flipped the sketches on the left and referenced them, using tracing paper, to create the back and three-quarter back views to the right.

The purpose of the flipped sketch is to provide a silhouette you can base yourself on, but don’t get stuck on trying to keep the silhouette perfect. Make adjustments as you see fit to accurately portray the pose from the angle you’re looking at it. Use geometric structures to help you visualize the shapes as you would see them from behind.

When you see the face in your flipped sketch, imagine what the back of the head would look like. Is the character wearing a hat? What kind of hairstyle do they have?

When you see the torso, picture what the back of it would look like. Is the character standing up straight or hunched over? Would the torso be pointing toward the viewer or away from him? (in my case it’s pointing away).

When you see the feet and hands, picture how much of the toes and fingers you would see from behind. Would you see them at all?


Step 4

Tighten your lineup and make necessary adjustments to make the figures align properly. Photoshop can be very useful in this instance, since it allows you to select specific areas and realign, stretch and rotate them however you want.

If you don’t have access to Photoshop, you can use a ruler to create guides for yourself.

I put all my sketches together in Photoshop, added guides, and made all necessary adjustments to the sketch before finalizing the turnaround sheet.

More Examples

Turnaround model sheets for my characters Luther and Sloan.