those night

The named victims so far:

Georgina Callander, 18

An 18-year-old college student from Lancashire, was the first victim to be identified following the Manchester attack.

Many of her friends have paid tribute to the teen, alongside Runshaw College where she was studying, and a number of celebrities.

“Georgina Callander was a former Bishop Rawstorne pupil studying with us on the second year of her Health and Social Care course.”

Saffie Rose Roussos, 8

She had been at the Ariana Grande concert with her mum Lisa Roussos and sister Ashlee Bromwich when the explosion shook the venue. Her mum and sister were rushed to hospital, but lost contact with Saffie. Saffie-Rose Roussos died from her injuries at the concert on Monday night.

Chris Upton, headteacher at Saffie’s school, said in a statement: “Saffie was simply a beautiful little girl in every aspect of the word. She was loved by everyone and her warmth and kindness will be remembered fondly. Saffie was quiet and unassuming with a creative flair.”

John Atkinson, 28

28-year-old John Atkinson from Bury was the third victim to be identified.

It’s understood that John had been leaving the concert when a lone man detonated a suicide bomb shortly after 10.30 on Monday evening.

Megan Hurley, schoolgirl

It is not known how old Megan was, but earlier this evening the chair of governors at Halewood Primary School said a girl who went to the school had died in the suicide bombing, according to Liverpool Echo.

He added that she had attended with her older brother who was seriously injured.

Olivia Campbell, 15

A heartbroken Mrs Campbell had broken down in tears on ITV’s Good Morning Britain earlier in the day, when her daughter was missing.

She spoke of how she had not spoken to her daughter Olivia since she set off for the event. "I can’t get through to her. I’ve called the hospitals, I’ve called all the places, the hotels where people say that children have been taken.”

"I’ve called the police. There’s no news, I’ve just got to wait. I’m waiting at home just in case she turns up here,” she told the morning program.

Alison Howe, 45 and Lisa Lees, 47

Two mums waiting to collect their teenage daughters after the concert were among the victims of the bomb attack. Their daughters, both aged 15, are understood to be safe.

Angelika, 40 and Marcin Klis, 42

Marcin and Angelika Klis, Polish parents of a student at the University of York, have been confirmed dead after the Manchester attack.

The pair posed for a selfie in the city centre just before going to the concert to pick their daughters up.

Their 20-year-old daughter had posted a plea for help on Facebook after they didn’t contact her following the attack.

The pair leave behind two daughters, Alex and Patricia.

Martyn Hett, 29

Martyn Hett, a Coronation Street superfan who had a tattoo of  Deirdre Barlow on his ankle and with his boyfriend won Come Dine With Me, has been named as one of the dead.

Kelly Brewster, 32

Kelly Brewster was at the concert with her sister Claire and niece Hollie Booth. She died shielding her niece from the blast and leaves behind a young daughter, Phoebe. Hollie has two broken legs but is safe.

Jane Tweddle-Taylor, 51

Jane Tweddle-Taylor had gone to the Arena with a friend to pick up the friend’s daughter. She was a mother of three: “One of the biggest challenges we’ve had is one of my daughters was away travelling in Australia, so we were trying to pick a time to notify her.”

Nell Jones, 14

Her family and friends had posted appeals on social media saying she was missing following the concert. A student at Holmes Chapel Comprehensive School.  She had been recently using crutches after suffering a ligament injury.

These are the 13 out of 22 named victims as of Wednesday, 24th of May at 2pm (GMT)

drew some scrappy and very very late to the game designs for those adventure boys

i keep trying to memorize every detail of the moments i live in. in the soreness of my legs from standing so long at a concert, the chill of the night, the patterns of a tablecloth, the oily texture in my mouth after eating fried bananas. i keep trying to memorize the feelings, the quiet contentedness, the laughter, the excitement. i keep trying to memorize the people, their smiles, the way they speak, what makes them laugh. i’m constantly on the cusp of the next part of my life and that’s just so.. strange. but it makes it so much easier to find happiness no matter what’s happening to me, in a way? because i’m already kind of looking at life with those rose-colored glasses of nostalgia, simply because i know these are times i’ll never be able to live again, and these are people i might not always have, and that makes it so much easier to appreciate everything i might miss later. 

3

Story-time with Sora and Noctis takes a weird turn. Noct may have competition for the title of Crown Prince of Napping!

Bonus time-jump panel in which Noctis takes his rightful place as the Naptime King:

Night in the Woods!!

I just finished this beautiful video game called Night in the Woods that I am now absolutely in love with and here is why: 

  • Casual LGBT representation - the protagonist is canonically bisexual (maybe pan!) and is best friends with a gay couple that have very lifelike relationship problems (that have nothing to do with being gay), and the protagonist continually refers to God as “they.” I’m a fan of the ship Maebea, but it’s not openly canon.
  • Deep talks that are accurate to life - emotions, relationships, beliefs, abuse, mental health, it’s all there and it’s all important.
  • The CHARACTERS. They are so unbelievably loveable and iconic, and have such a range of emotions and specific reactions to the events in the game that make them all very real as well. They are also all cartoon animals (the protagonist is a cat, and her friends are alligators, bears, and foxes, and her neighborhood includes penguins and raccoons).  There’s a character that just tells you a weak poem every day and has no other real significance but to tell you this poem. 
  • The plot is simultaneously about a cult of ghosts and a dissociative disorder, but more on this later
  • Good comedy at no one’s expense 
  • Lots and lots of fantastic one-liners
  • Fantastic graphics, fantastic game mechanics (platforming!! It’s so much fun because there really are no limits. You can walk on the sidewalk or on top of cars or along a powerline, whatever you want) 
  • A+ art style - it utilizes color to set mood and determine setting (or state of consciousness, considering the playable dream sequences left up to interpretation) and even converts to sihlouettes in some places where it’s most chilling to do so. They use the eyes of the characters to show most of the emotions. The music that was chosen for this game is absolutely perfectly placed to get the most out of the storyline. 
  • A+ suspense - the writing is beautiful and compelling. The comic relief is timed perfectly, but I still teared up in multiple chapters of the game. The game starts out where our protagonist just dropped out of college to go back home, and is hanging out with her old friends, but takes a lot of sharp turns to get into a much deeper plot over the little subplots we started. Part of me wonders if the game would change very much if I chose different dialogue options so I may find some playthroughs later, but for now I’d just like to appreciate how smoothly the plot progresses despite how quickly it descends into very deep topics.
  • It is a long game with a lot of story, but that’s part of what I love. It’s just long enough to be satisfying and I’m still sad I finished it already. Despite complications in the plot as the story continues, it’s very easy to follow. Anything that doesn’t make sense is intentionally confusing to highlight the mindset of the character you’re playing as, and I think that’s the best way to do it. 
  • There is also a lot that they don’t explain, a lot to reveal through theorizing only. I could think about this forever and not come up with every theory to be pulled from this. 
  • One of the topics they keep coming back to is the assumed mental illnesses of the different characters, even the protagonist (I only say “assumed” because they never directly say that the characters have any mental health issues, but the way they talk about their fears and the way they view reality points toward very well-portrayed and lifelike mental illnesses, mainly dissociative and anxiety disorders.)
  • Nihilistic existential dread (part of what I love about it, but could trigger some dissociation in people who are more sensitive to that kind of thing. Subtly breaks the fourth wall once to talk about how video games are just shapes and will never exist) 
  • P A R A L L E L S
  • Solid “moral” to take from the story, not even eye-roll-corny
  • What a beautiful ending

The game is about $20 on steam, but if you can’t afford it or prefer to watch games rather than play them, jacksepticeye has flawless voices for all of the characters and some good theories going so that’s the one I recommend

Here we have the HD version of Tyler’s beautiful performance of Ride from SNL

If I Ever Go To The Night Court: I would make bargains left and right just to get those aesthetic, beautiful ass tattoos all over my body