this was an awful lot of work

So we get asked about a lot of stuff.

But nothing.. I mean nothing… more than this.

You all missed skills… we know.  So did we.  You know what else we missed?  Perks.  You too? 

Well….   we have got news for you!  Shad0wshayd3 has been hard at work on a major project.  We’ve kept it close to the vest for now, but here it is, dressed up in a sexy new UI by master of the UI Neanka.

Skills?
Perks?
Aw yeah!

Oh, and since I know you’ll ask… and Shad0wshayd3 is planning to release a version of this for use in FO4 outside Cascadia, too!

(note: requires F4SE)

anonymous asked:

Hi! I love your work and use it a lot. Do you know if anyone has extended the short curly hair from Parenthood yet? I spent most of the day looking for it but can't find it!

Hello! Aw, I’m very happy to hear that! I have not been on tumblr as much recently, but I’m sure that many people have made some extended versions of the curly hair from Parenthood. I did see a post by @femmeonamissionsims where she compiled a list of some her favorite Parenthood CC hairs, which you can find here!

Hopefully people can comment with some of their favorites that didn’t make it on @femmeonamissionsims‘s list!

anonymous asked:

I really like the art style of the bio comics. It fits perfectly and really enhances the feel and the impact of them. I don't know enough art theory to really explain but it works very well. The panel layouts and pose/perspective choices are also great.

aw, thank you! i actually thought a while about what kind of style to pick for these comics, and since a lot of them are going to be pretty dark, i thought id balance it with a cuter, simpler art style so things dont look overwhelmingly awful.

Thanks for the tag @roguewrath. Sorry it took a while to respond. All of this is rebelcaptain btw. 

List all the things you’re currently working on in as much or as little detail as you’d like, then tag some friends to see what they’re working on: writing, art, gifsets, whatever.

  1. Expansion on my Foster Family au fic that’ll dive more into the Chirrut/Bodhi/Baze/Jyn fam and how Cassian joins it. 
  2. An awful fic that I absolutely hate myself for where Cassian and Jyn survive Scarif only to die later. 
  3. Angsty fight one-shot because I’m currently intrigued by that dynamic of their relationship. 
  4. A Bodhi and Jyn mission gone wrong with lots of Space Sibling feels. 
  5. Also possibly making a series of each member of the Rogue One crew with rebelcaptain baby, like this one that I did for Cassian, based off this post

This is shorter than I want it to be so maybe I’ll take prompts soon. 

Feel like I’m late to the game on this so tagging anyone who wants to do it. Of course if you want to officially be tagged just shoot me a message and I’ll add you. 

Room For Dessert 01

Originally posted by jeonify

Description: A boring company dinner gets a little bit spicy when you notice the tension between you and your table’s waiter.

Pairing: Jungkook x Reader

Genre: Smut (M)

Word Count: 8.1k

Index: 01, 02, 02.5

A/N: Filth. Straight filth. That’s what this is. Jungkook’s graduation photos pretty much ruined me, especially when I saw the one of him taking their order and just looking so good and UGH. This is the result. Sin. Filth. Porn put to words. Enjoy. Please try not to die. 

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Long Live Octopus Pie

Three cheers!

I check the webpage out of habit, but Meredith Gran’s comic work Octopus Pie is over.  I feel like this is how sports fans feel when a jersey is retired and lifted to the rafters, forever in its untouchable place, time divided between when it was active and whatever comes after.  

That might sound grandiose, but in my mind, nothing tops the ten year run of Octopus Pie.  And in the lifespan of what we call Webcomics, 2007-2017 is a granddaddy of a run, worthy of names like “pioneering,” “influential” and “groundbreaking” because in the space of those years, in this new medium, there was room to be those things without any hyperbole.  The comics landscape of the past decade needed filling out and Meredith carved her space out with precision, showing a polish and drive and a talent from the beginning that set a high standard.  

I’m guessing that I started Hark a Vagrant about six months after Octopus Pie began, but Meredith’s was already a name to be reckoned with, due to the solid reputation of her previous comic Skirting Danger and because she was an honest to god trained animator in a sea of stickmen comics or two-dudes-on-a-couch comics (RIP forever *kisses fingers, holds them to the sky*). I was intimidated by her sheer capability.  But inspired too.  I did not need to be intimidated, she was one of the first people I met in comics, and easily one of the best.

Meredith and I briefly shared an apartment and a studio, and I can tell you, she can draw circles around everyone you know.  I later shared a studio with Mike Holmes, who could also draw circles around everyone, and now the two of them are married in some sort of talent supernova.  I am happy for them, even though I feel like I make grade three crayon pictures next to them.  But the other thing that being friends with Meredith for a long time has shown is the cutting wit, the care for stories done right, the love for a medium that will take you through highs and lows that come with comics, and lately through her job as a comics professor, the nurturing of upcoming talent.  I see all of this in Octopus Pie, a comic where character was paramount, where plots were expertly moved, a fine balance was found between the messiness of people and the fun you can have with stories, where subtle emotional movements where rendered with room to breathe, where I felt like I could reach deep into the hearts and minds of the characters on the page because they had been fleshed out so well over the years that they seemed as real people, people that I loved.

I don’t really like that phrase “comics will break your heart,” commonly attributed to Schultz, or Kirby, it doesn’t really matter.  You see it all the time, mostly when people are reckoning with the fact that they work in an unforgiving medium.  I don’t even know what it is about the saying that I don’t like.  Maybe it’s because we all know that comics are hard work, we all know that you might put your life and blood and heart into something and you might get nothing back.  There are no surprises to be found there - it’s not a bad day you had, it’s a life you’re well aware of living, if you do.  But we love the perserverers in comics.  The people who live the phrase are the ones who inspire us the most.

I’m saying all this, and pardon the segue, because I have seen Octopus Pie, some of the finest story work of my generation, passed for recognition time and again and it confuses the hell out of me, truly.  I don’t want to turn a tribute to a work I hold dear into sour grapes, that’s not the intention here, but lord above, if I can’t point this out now, then when can I?  We all know that there are no guarantees in this life (comics will break your heart) but I’ll say this once and then leave it: this is a comic of quality that was miles ahead of so many of its peers, and it deserved better, industry wise.  To wrap up the earlier point, maybe I don’t like CWBYH because it implies that you should shrug your shoulders and not ask for better every time, that a short end of some kind of stick is expected even.  That’s easy when it’s yourself, but speaking as a fan now, I say to heck with shrugging, I want to put Meredith on my shoulders and parade her around and dump her into a Scrooge McDuck thing full of awards.  

Actually that sounds pointy and bad and the Ignatz awards are bricks to begin with so maybe forget that analogy but you get the idea.

I hope you read Octopus Pie, I hope you buy the books.  I hope the legacy of it is long and full, because it always will be for me.  And I think readers will agree, because I know this devoted fan base pretty well.  I read the comments, I’ve sat next to Mer at comic shows, I’ve listened to some of the emails that touched her.  I know this is a comic that meant a lot, to a lot of us.  In this world of work we put our hearts and souls into to begin with, that is a wonderfully worthy thing.

I do not know what Meredith will do next, but whatever it is, I am here for it, seat pulled close to the stage.  The retired jersey is in the rafters, the game is still being played by the people who dreamed better because it was there.  Aw what can I say, I’m sentimental!

 Thanks, Meredith. <3

anonymous asked:

Any advice on how to write a heist story something like oceans Eleven?

Well, you can start by watching Ocean’s Eleven, and Ocean’s Eleven, and then Leverage, and then Burn Notice, and then The A-Team, and then Mission: Impossible, and then all the other heist stories like The Italian Job or Heat. Watch, read, uncover as many stories about criminals as you can from fiction to nonfiction to reading security analyst blogs. Read the spy memoirs, the thief memoirs, the fake ones and the real ones. Check out magicians, hypnotists, card tricks, and sleight of hand. Watch the making ofs and director’s commentaries looking for clues behind the thought process of these stories. The hows and the whys as you look into the research they did. Burn Notice, for example, is famous for using stunt props and technological rigs that work in real life. Like using cell phones to create cheap bugs on the go.

The worlds of criminal fiction and spy fiction rely on being able to present (or convincingly fake) a world which feels real. A heist is all about exploitation. So, you need a world with security structures to exploit. You’ve got to know how things work before you can craft a way to break them. Social engineering, hacking, and every other criminal skill is about breaking the systems in place. So, you’ve got to get a baseline for how law enforcement and security analysts work. What security systems are set up to look like. The ways we go about discouraging thieves. Better yet how people behave. Real, honest to god human behavior.

So, you know, pick somewhere in order to start your research. Get an idea of what you want write about stealing, then learn everything about the object, the museum, the city, the country, and its customs as you can.

If you’re setting a heist in a futuristic or fantasy setting then luck you, you get to make all of it up.

Learning the plot structure and conventions of the heist genre is the first step. This means watching lots and lots of heist movies, shows, and reading books. Over time, as you become better at critical analysis, you’ll begin to see specific story structures and character archetypes emerge.

The Heist Story is a genre. Like every other genre, it comes with its own structure, cliches, archetypes, plots, and genre conventions which necessitate the narrative. The better grasp you have of those, the better you’ll be at writing a heist.

For example, a heist story like Ocean’s Eleven relies on a collection of thieves rather than a single individual. The character types are as follows:

The Pointman - Your planner, strategist, team leader, and the Jack of All Trades. Can also be called the Mastermind. They’re the one who can take the place of anyone on the team should they fall through. They’re not as good as a specialist, but they’re very flexible. Narratively, he plans the cons and subs in where he’s needed.

The Faceman - Your experienced Grifter, here for all your social engineering needs. These guys talk their way in.

The Infiltrator - Your cat burglar or break-in artist. Basically, the conventional genre thief. Your Parker, Catwoman, Sam Fisher, or Solid Snake. The stealth bastards, they’re all about silent in, out, and playing acrobatic games with the lasers.

The Hacker - The electronics and demolitions specialist. Usually this is the guy in the van overseeing stuff remotely. Your Eye in the Sky. Their skill set can be split up and swapped around as necessary.

The Muscle - The one who is good at fighting. They’re combat focused characters, usually with mercenary and special forces backgrounds. Though, that’s optional.

The Wheelman - The one who handles the getaway. They’re your often overlooked transport specialists. It’s not just that they can drive, they’re skilled at getting lots of people around, figuring out how to move your valuables, and exiting hostile cities or countries undetected. They get the team in and they get them out.

For an example of these archetypes, I’m going to use Leverage. Nathan Ford, The Pointman (technically, he’s written like a Faceman). Sophie Devereaux , The Faceman. Parker, the Infiltrator. Hardison, the Hacker. Eliot, the Muscle. They all take turns being the Wheelman.

Other examples like Burn Notice: Michael Westen, the Pointman. Sam Axe, the Faceman. Fiona, the Muscle. They all take turns with explosives, Michael will invariably take all the roles during the course of the show.

Ocean’s Eleven has multiple variants of these archetypes, all broken down and mixed up.

You can mix and match these qualities into different individuals or break them apart like in Ocean’s Eleven, and more than one character can fill more than one role, but that’s the basic breakdown. For example, your hacker doesn’t need to be a guy in a van overlooking the whole security grid. One guy or girl with a cell phone can sit in the lobby of a building with an unsecured wireless network and crack the security. Welcome to the 21st century. The skills don’t necessarily need to take the specific expected shape.

What you do need is the basic breakdown:  You need someone to plan the con, you need someone to be your face or grifter, you need someone to break in, you need someone to watch the security/electronics, you need muscle to back you up, and someone’s got to cover the getaway.

These shift depending on your plan, but this is the expected lineup for a heist narrative. The first step of a heist narrative is not the plan because we don’t have one yet. We’ve got an idea. Pick your target. Maybe it’s a famous painting. Maybe it’s a casino. Maybe it’s a rare artifact from a private investor’s collection loaned to a museum for a short period of time. Maybe it’s art stolen by the Nazis during WWII. Whatever it is, figure it out.

The next step is simple. If you want the thing, you’ve got to find a way to get it. This is a big job, your standard thief won’t be able to pull it off alone. So, you gotta go recruiting. Get your team together. Make sure to establish the goals of the different members for joining. Who they are. Their pedigree. One might be an old flame or an old enemy. This is where we lay out some character driven subplots.

When everyone’s together, we’ve got to lay out the plan. Before we have a plan though, we need to establish where the object is and the issues in getting it. Why this has never been done before. So, what are the challenges? Invariably, an object worth a great deal of money will have a lot of security protecting it. Figure out what that security is, who the item belongs to, what sort of retribution do the thieves face beyond what they might expect. Lasers, pressure plates, cameras, security, other career criminals, mob bosses, the rich and powerful, whatever.

After that: How do you get it? Then you’ve got to plan the con, while taking everything into account.

Then, We prep the Con. There will be steps to take before the con can be put into place, your characters taking their positions in plain sight. Stealing whatever pieces you need to make it work. Casing the joint. Etc.

Then: Run the Con. This is the part with the actual stealing. Better known as the first attempt. Things go well, there may be a few mistakes, but things are going well and then we…

Encounter Resistance. While running the con, something goes wrong, pieces fall apart, the thieves come close to success but the object gets moved and they suddenly need a new plan. New information may pop up, it may be one of your artists was running a con of their own separate from the rest. If there’s a double cross in the works then this may be when and where it lands.

We’re ready now, so it’s time hit up: Steal the Thing, Round Two. Your characters put their new plan into play and get about thieving the object of their desire.

Lastly: The Get Away. This is the part where your thieves make for the hills with their stolen treasure. This can be short or long depending on the kind of story you’re telling and other double crosses may occur here. It could be the end of the story or the beginning of a new heist.

Heist stories are like mystery novels. They’re all about sleight of hand and misdirection. You’ve got to keep just enough information on the table to keep your audience on the hook, and just enough information off the table to surprise them later on the twist. Yet, when they go back to re-read the novel again, they’ll find the answer was there all along. They just didn’t see it coming.

If anything, learning how to write a well-done heist or a mystery or any kind of novel in this genre will teach you a lot about how to manage your foreshadowing and create superb plot twists. Like any good con, you need to lay out all the conflicting pieces where people can see them, let them draw their own conclusions, withhold the critical context, and then hit them with the whammy.

Like lots of audiences, new writers (and even some old ones) can get distracted by the shock and awe. They see they’re impressed by the conclusion, not the lay-up. If you want to write any kind of fiction, you need to learn to see past the curtain and pay attention to the critical pieces leading into an important moment rather than the moment itself.

Good writing isn’t modular, you can’t just strip out pieces and run with them because you’ll end up missing the crucial, sometimes innocuous pieces that ensured the scene worked. Like the Victorian Hand Touch, every moment between the two leads and most of their scenes with secondary players are working for that singular instance of eventual, gleeful catharsis.

If you’ve got a plot twist coming in your novel, every sentence from the second you start writing is working towards it. You start laying out your pieces, funneling in your tricks, and playing with misdirection. You may have multiple twists, to cover yourself, divert your audience, congratulate them for successfully guessing your ploy, and reassure their initial suspicions before catching them again on the upswing.

The clever writer is as much a con artist as their characters. The only difference is the target of their con is their audience. The tricks in their bag are narrative ones, and they work with the understanding that it doesn’t matter if someone guesses the end so long as they’re entertained by the journey. A great story stays entertaining long after the audience has figured out all the twists.

So, don’t get caught up in Red Herrings and frightened about not being able to outsmart other people. Tell a good story with conviction and heart about a bunch of crooks out to steal their heart’s desire.

That’s all there is to it.

-Michi

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Sigil of Abundance and Prosperity

Money magic can be tricky. There are a number of things that can go awry if you cast specifically for money. For instance, maybe you get the amount you want, but it happens through something awful, like getting hit by a car and receiving a settlement. Even if the money you desire does come to you through some non-terrible means, you might end up losing it immediately to unforeseen expenses. I read somewhere once that money is best regarded as a sort of trickster god, and I tend to agree. 

As such, I find that it works out better to cast for the feelings and outcomes you want to get through that money, things like security, happiness, and having everything you need. That’s what this sigil is about. A lot of spring and summer energy poured itself into this one, and a goddess showed up completely of her own accord.

Here’s to abundance!

Let's be more than friends?
Shima
Let's be more than friends?

H-H-H-HERE IT IS…the song I wrote for Michael (or rather, that Michael wrote for Jeremy) in chapter two of 24-Hour Life Tickets!

The lyrics aren’t exact since I sorta messed up at one part but wHATEVER

Also please ignore the horrible quality I recorded this in my basement and with my phone so it’s nOT THE BEST
And yeah it’s all acapella since I can’t play an instrument to save my life there’s some clapping in there to give it a nice beat but thas about it frens

Please keep in mind that I am in no way a professional songwriter or anything remotely like that;; I just did this for fun? And I came up with this randomly I didn’t really plan it or anything lol

Now please excuse me while I go and scream into the void

Imagine Andrew as a teacher

(bear with me I gotta get this out of my head) 

-Okay so he doesn’t go continue to play exy 

-But becomes a criminology teacher at Palmetto (cos Nora said that was his major) 

-With glasses and all that shit. His students have a love/hate relation with him. To put it mildly, he’s a complete ass but I love him 

-also Professor Minyard

-And mostly after the first class itself the students realise this- You do not talk when he’s talking or giving a lecture unless you want a perfectly aimed chalk thrown at your head or a “Get the fuck out or shut the fuck up you choose Avery” shouted your way 

-And you do not dare to make fun of his height. He will fucking annihilate you. “You think I’m smol small Johnson, have you seen your dick?“ 

-And yes he remembers your name and grade that fucker with his eidetic memory 

-And his students are terrified of him but have a lot of respect for this teacher who doesn’t look like an exy fan but occasionally shows up in jerseys or sweatshirts with “Josten” written at the back 

-So. One day this student has some work and goes to Andrew’s tiny office Imagine his shock and awe when he sees Neil Josten, Olympic winner, exy champion in all his glory sitting on Andrew’s chair with his feet crossed on the table 

-“You’re not Andrew.”, Neil says. 

-“I had some questions for mid-” And Andrew enters. 

-He stops when he sees Neil “Feet off my table. Now.” the disrespect ffs Neil  And the student’s just like do?? you?? know?? who?? that?? is??

-And the student looks over at Neil who btw still has his feet on the table and the student thinks “Does he have a death wish?” Neil breaks the silence and says 

-“I thought I’d surprise you.”       

“Leave”, comes the reply 

-And for a moment they both only have eyes for each other, leaving the poor sophomore highly uncomfortable 

 -And then thankfully, before he/she becomes a murder witness, Neil takes his legs off the table and smiles. Neil Josten smiles. This was the man who ripped Riko Moriyama apart. Who fought tooth and nail to get to where he was. Who’s mouth has gotten him into trouble more times than he could count. He fucking smiles. 

-And Neil walks past Andrew, almost brushing his shoulder while leaving and Andrew grips his forearm

-And everything but the two of them melts away. Nothing else fucking matters as if it ever did in the first place 

-And for a second, a fucking fraction of a second, Andrew’s expression shifts 

-And the student is in shock cos obvs Andrew teaches like he does everything else. With stone cold apathy and a tiny bit of disgust but still fucking brilliant. 

-And then Andrew says, “I’ll see you at home.” And then the student notices the “Minyard” on Neil’s sweater (Renee gave it to Andrew as a birthday present when she learned to knit and Neil wears it all the damn time) and understanding seeps into place. Neil leaves after a bit more staring. 

-And Andrew looks at his student and quirks an eyebrow.  

-By the next day the whole school knows that their criminology teacher is dating Neil Josten. 

-After that my poor baby Andrew has to keep repeating in the first class of every freshman year “If you want to be killed in your sleep or want to fail this class, try asking for an autograph. Oh and get used to death threats, you are going to major in fucking criminology after all.

Why yes, we should ring up every item.

I used to be a front end manager for a large hardware chain in the Midwest. It was early in the day (around 9 am or so) and my head cashier had called in sick so I was already behind in a lot of ways. Luckily I had a girl scheduled who was a former head cashier who had left the company and came back as a full time cashier. We’ll call her Jenny. Jenny was smart and worked hard, she was always professional and was quick with a joke. I liked when she was scheduled to work with me.

Jenny was around 7 months pregnant (and had the most awful things said to her because she didn’t have a ring on her left hand, but that’s another story) and I had given her the phone while I was trying to accomplish various tasks to set up my day.

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Tips for Making Life Work

1. Focus on doing one thing at a time. Tackling multiple activities may seem more efficient, but giving one task your complete attention is actually more productive in the end. It also cuts down on your levels of stress.

2. Slow down and enjoy the journey. Whatever you’re doing is important right now. Don’t wish that it was over – and try and make it fun.

3. Stop being such a perfectionist. If you’re a pilot or a surgeon then standards have their place … but for the rest of life “don’t be so hard on yourself”. Don’t stress out over details and impressing everyone.

4. Learn to delegate to others: take the pressure off yourself. Perhaps other people won’t do the job as well. But that’s how people grow – so why not give them that chance – and spend your own time doing things that you’d prefer to do.

5. Don’t always be waiting for the other shoe to drop. Lots of people spend their lives terrified of what might happen – and most of the time things work out to be just fine. Thus, they’re worrying for nothing when they could be having fun!

6. Focus on what you have, not what you wish you had. All of us have things we can be grateful for. Not everything is awful –and life’s not always bad. And if you change your focus to what you’re thankful for, you’ll find you feel much happier, and worry a lot less.

7. If things go wrong, just shrug your shoulders and smile. Remind yourself that life goes on - so don’t wreak your life wishing things were different or regretting what you’ve done. Also, things might work out next time. Tomorrow’s a new day.

3

Our teacher suggested us to practice different styles for our portfolio soo… I tried Jin Kim’s style and failed miserably. BUT I tried.

I had a lot of fun and I actually was dying to work on George Blagden’s expressions since I watched this scene. Concept artist problems.
Anyway! I’ll keep practicing this style.

Ruin my chances at my dream job, will you? Please, let me return the favor.
(long story. tl;dr at the end)

I am a nurse. When I was in nursing school, I loved my rotation through ICU and wanted nothing more than to be an ICU nurse, because I eventually wanted to become a nurse anesthetist (ICU experience is required for anesthesia school). My first job after graduation was not in ICU, but after 10 months as a nurse, I was offered a position in a Multi-system ICU. It was a training program for new nurses and I was told I would get 16 weeks of training. Fantastic! I was so excited! Then right before I started, I was told, oops, no, you actually only get 6 weeks of training. Um, okay, kind of concerned that that’s not enough time, but I’m going to try my best. I was somewhat apprehensive, but still excited. Until I met my preceptor.

This girl was undoubtedly intelligent and knew her job, but she was so mean to me that I was regularly having near-panic attacks in the few weeks I worked there. She would send huge emails to the educator about how much I sucked, and would ream me out in front of other staff and patients (one time one of the other nurses had to intervene). The other girl who started the program at the same time as me even said how awful my preceptor was being to me. She was also arrogant as fuck, and always bragged about shit, like how her fiancé (who was a practicing nurse anesthetist and made a lot of money) paid all this money for her engagement ring, and paid all this money for his surprise proposal, and how once they were married and had kids if she wanted a thousand dollar baby stroller, that’s what he was going to buy her, and how her wedding was going to be so big and fancy and expensive and perfect. And she was one of those people who was “super Christian,” and was fake nice and passive aggressive when talking to you that it starts to make you wonder if you’re crazy for seeing the vile in them. I hated her with the fire of a thousand burning suns.

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I miss summer and all my friends from work.

Im so glad I’ll be back again

I’m having one of those days where all I can think is “everything is awful and I’m never going to improve” so I decided to compare my first iwaoi picture to my most recent just to remind myself that even if I can’t see the improvement in the short-term, it’s definitely still happening.

I think the best thing you can do as an artist especially if youre struggling with a lot of art block is to let go of style. Whenever i see anons ask popular artists how to gain a style im like omg dont! dont get one. Its suffocating tbh! I used to have one art style i used and i only drew in that one and it was awful, i couldnt draw anything i really wanted because i was so scared to let go of this carefully cultivated style i had and it was ruining my work! 

I’m so glad for the day i was like you know what, fuck this its not working! I started playing with my art more and now i have 2-3 styles i cycle between and i feel sooooo much better about my art. That’s my advice to you i guess as a fellow artist, let go of “style” and have fun again! make stuff you want to make even if it looks bad or not how youd visioned it, just mess around!!! 

hello everybody! i’m back here with one of my awful guides about how to survive university. i’m back because i struggled a lot last semester (aka my first academic semester, yay) but i guess i’ve finally found my balance!

What was hard to get is that the fact that i’m very busy with academic life doesn’t allow me to let myself rot. You heard that: you gotta take care of yourself, buddy. It was hard to learn, at least to me, because i get totally absorbed by work and everything but i’m trying to think about myself as well. Here’s what i wish i knew when i first move out:

  • eat yummy food: i spend four months dying to go back home just to eat something which wasn’t almost uncooked meat or terrible veggie burgers but this semester i’ve somehow decided i wanna treat myself. I trying to cook myself food (a+ food) and sometimes i make extra food so that i can freeze it and eat it whenever i don’t feel like cooking. I’ve discovered nice recipes just browsing the internet! (unfortunately, i’m italian and i can’t link you my cook blog references but i’d be happy to translate it for you so just text me if you wanna know more!)
  • body lotions: fucking use it! they make you skins softer and scented and i swear they make me feel like i’m truly taking care of myself!
  • clean your room: sometimes you are just overwhelmed by work and everything but you’ve gotta remember that a nice and tidy environment is truly helpful! (i can’t tell you more because i’m still working on it lmao)
  • allow yourself to relax: sometimes i feel guilty when i’m not studying so i force myself to keep my eyes on books but sometimes i feel like it’s  counter-prodictive.  The more you study the more tired you are and it’s tolerable when exams are on because you know you’re gonna relax as they’re over but how about when they’re still far? Just chill: you’ll be refreshed and stronger for your exams!
protip

don’t ever tell your kids “if you’re not being useful then you’re being a burden” like manage not to say that so that your kids don’t work themselves into a depression and then death :) just a protip for all you parents out there