this was a graphic design project

Goddamit Adobe iteration 9536

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: TAKE YOUR SOFTWARE-AS-SERVICE AND STICKIT WHERE THE SUN DON’T SHINE, ADOBE.

Ahem.

I’m considering finally caving and getting the Creative Cloud version of Illustrator *only* just to do this one project, because my old CS3 version of the suite works just fine except for illustrator. Illustrator isn’t the friendliest program to begin with, but it got way better in 4 and 6.

Take a break. Enjoy these LGBTQ+ themed Tumblrs.

Originally posted by upandoutcomic

Up and Out (@upandoutcomic)

This self-described “serious autobio series” depicts the day-to-day of the artist’s gender transition. Some of the posts will make your heart ache, others will put a smile on your face. It’s super real, it’s very honest, and it’s almost always done in three panels or less.

Originally posted by dicksandascension

Pricks and Pretension (@pricksandpretension)

Here is a thing you never knew you wanted: an LGBTQ+, dual-authored comic adaptation of Pride and Prejudice set in Canada. Randi Hamel’s (@rannibuns) contributions are all tinted red, Tajliya Jamal’s (@heyimtaj) are awash in blue, and the Tumblr is updated every Friday.

Originally posted by slimycactus

Queer Graffiti (@queergraffiti)

Whether it’s a really well-painted Bambi or just some hastily written permanent marker on concrete, all graffiti is welcome on @queergraffiti. It’s a submission Tumblr, and it accepts photos of graffiti all over the world.

Originally posted by lgbt-moodboard

LGBT+ Moodboards and Art (@lgbt-moodboard)

Mood boards have been everywhere the past year or two. This is just one Tumblr out of a few that are serving up LGBTQ+ themed mood board goodness as their followers request them. The sky is the limit. No, actually—the sky isn’t even the limit. See the space themed lesbian mood board above. Hell yeah? Hell yeah.

Originally posted by lukeethornhill

Lukee Thornhill (@lukeethornhill)

This graphic designer is illustrating one important person in LGBTQ history every day in June for Pride. Day 5 of the aptly titled 30 Days of Pride series featured Miss Major, a trans woman activist and Executive Director Emeritus of the Transgender, Gender Variant, and Intersex Justice Project. Miss Major, who was at the Stonewall uprising in 1969, is ready to retire. You can donate to her GoFundMe, if you so choose. (And yes, it’s legit.)

Have a nice Thursday, Tumblr. 🌈

7

ok heAR ME OUT: Voltron Art School AU (totally self-indulgent and based off the art school I’m going to coughcough nvm) 

I wrote many cool n’ pretty wild headcanons for it so uhhhh, read under the cut: 

Keep reading

Learning Graphic Design On Your Own

A Quick Note…

Everyone learns differently. Some people like to ask questions in class, others like to watch videos that they can pause and replay, and even more people could prefer to just tinker and see what happens (I’m personally a tinkerer). The first thing you should do when learning on your own (so probably online or through books) is to do some research and know how you like to learn.

So, let’s start with… what even is “Graphic Design”?

Let’s get this straight… graphic designers aren’t fine artists. They are problem solvers, visual communicators, and sometimes curators of information in an aesthetically pleasing way. We organize information and try to make the world an easier-to-understand and more beautiful place. Of course, there are other fields like advertising where we communicate to customers why they should buy certain products. Or there are User Interface/Experience designers that will develop websites and video game interfaces and design how you interact with it. Look into graphic design and see what field you want to be in. What do you want to do with graphic design?

Fun fact, the google definition says: “the art or skill of combining text and pictures in advertisements, magazines, or books.” and to that, I’d like to say we do SO MUCH MORE.

Now that you know what you’re doing…Here’s the VERY BRIEF process!
(I may make individual posts for each step later on)

  1. Learn the basics
    1. Typography, how to use the basic principles of line, shape, color, and so on is usually for everyone no matter your field.
    2. Basics like composition are also very important. If you’re into editorial then typographic spreads will be more of your focus. If you’re in web design then seeing how websites are typically laid out will be a thing to look into. Basic typography, color theory, and principles still apply!
    3. Basics and principles are a google search (or a book) away! Everyone talks about these things ALL the time.
  2. Look up inspiration and develop an “eye” for design
    1. Follow design blogs! Follow other designers! On all of your social media! (There are so many Tumblr blogs and Instagram accounts solely dedicated to graphic design curation).
  3. Look into the big names of the industry
    1. Why were they remembered? Everyone else in the field probably remembers them for that, too.
    2. What was so great about them? Apply what you learn to your own work!
    3. If they’re well known, they probably have at least decent work to get inspired from!
  4. Research is done… time to do some work!
    1. If you’re just starting out, there are some things you’re probably not used to. Doing things by hand with sharpie markers on paper will definitely help train your eye and mind to think more about communication, not pretty things. 
    2. Abstract things down into simple shapes. Then try communicating that same object with fewer shapes. Maybe only lines? Geometric style? Play around with communication! This is key when you get into icons, logos, and other visuals that require a more minimal look. 
    3. Remember, you make information more easily accessible. The best logos are easy to remember because they are simple and effective. Your work may one day need that kind of punch!
  5. The jump from traditional to digital
    1. It’s time to learn about your program(s) of choice… my biggest piece of advice would be to just mess with it. Learning on your own by trying to make something is one of the best ways to train your mind and body on how to use the programs.
    2. Try every tool. Try making basic shapes. Then make basic objects with those shapes. Then try making a person or something more complicated. Try to test every tool to see what you’d use it for!
    3. Don’t know anything or how to do something? Google it! If you’re asking there’s probably 5+ different YouTube videos, 3+ articles, and 100+ tutorials on how to do it.
  6. Let’s work on projects!
    1. Now that you’re familiar with the history, principles, other designers, and the programs… just keep on making stuff!
    2. Making your own projects (make your own website, business cards, a flyer for a club, a T-Shirt, and so on…) is my biggest recommendation on how to learn graphic design. Actually applying everything you’ve learned will make you think in a problem-solving way! Also sharing things that you’ve made that actually matter is way more fun than sharing a fancy circle you made with no context. (You can say “look at this T-Shirt I made!” instead of “look at this weird circle I made!”)
  7. Get feedback from designers and non-designers
    1. Once you’ve made stuff… ask everyone! Non-designers will give you a client’s perspective of your work. A designer’s perspective will help you grow as a designer and they may see things that you and your average person wouldn’t have noticed. (you’re always free to ask me if you’d like!)
    2. Please remember to not take feedback personally (unless they’re being rude, then just ignore them). You’re learning and growing and there’s always room for improvement. A lot of feedback is not a bad thing!
  8. Stay determined!
    1. Being a designer isn’t easy. That T-Shirt you made that took you a couple days? Someone could say they don’t get it. Other designers could say there was a better way to execute your idea. Another person may even say it looks like something else!
    2. When you design you have to expect to make revisions, rethinking, and making more revisions until it’s at a good enough place to publish. But no matter what, you have to remember that it’s not about PERFECTION. It’s about getting it DONE and learning to grow. No one is perfect, and it’s mostly subjective, so just take the criticism you agree with and don’t apply what you disagree with. As a designer, you should know what’s right, wrong, or what you should consider bringing up to other designers.
    3. KEEP MAKING MORE STUFF! You can even remake older stuff as you go on! Just keep going!

That’s my super brief process!

Now honestly, I could’ve gotten down into the nitty gritty details of each step, but this is basically how I’d suggest going about it if you want to get a head start before getting into college, or you want to just learn on your own.

If you guys have any additional questions or want me to go more in-depth about anything, feel free to let me know! :)

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My project for my infographics class (presented in a poster at the top)!

We had to design a campaign using a theme, 6 icons of a person in that theme, and apply it to collateral. I decided to do inspirational women involved in technology, so I called my campaign “FEMTECH”.

Pretty happy with this one! The style is definitely not what I usually do, so it was a fun experience!

If you guys saw my icons from before while they were a work in progress, this is how they turned out, haha.