this looks kind of cool

anonymous asked:

Yoongi actually reminds me of deadpool, no one knows if he's a hero or a villain he's just kind of there doing some kind of action that looks cool and saves some people and is harshly honest

That’s deadas why I said it!!!!! Anti heroes in my opinion are more realistic for instances: vegeta has a far more obtainable reality than goku like I’m here for it

All three of the boys’ single covers fit them so well:

Niall’s is like, “This is me. Here’s a bunch of writing because writing is important. It’s not fancy, but it’s real and it’s showing my process.

Louis’ is like, “Look at this cool, kind of funky font. It’s looks very electric and beat driven. Also, this is my friend, Steve.”

Harry’s is like, “You’ll never see my face, bitch. But here I am in the water. No one knows why or what’s going on. Good luck figuring this out!”

Seagulls

2

Converse High


In some kind of AU… 🍃


I’m more of a Callie kind of guy to be honest but Marie in the new trailer got my mind going crazy. Here’s my little idea about what she’ll look like. 

youtube

I made a Twitter thread a while ago about applying for jobs and I also got an ask about some of the specifics about how I wound up here, so in spite of the fact that this video makes me C R I N G E, I’m gonna share it and we’re gonna do some STORY TIME. Mostly this is me sharing the specifics of my own, personal story but maybe there’s some broadly useful stuff in here, idk.

Also, a fair warning that my ~*story time*~ got away from me, so I’m putting it under a cut. The tl;dr version that’s more broadly useful is:

  1. job applications are learning opportunities and you should make sure you’re learning things as you go about it
  2. your application should be a tailored narrative of your career trajectory
  3. don’t sell yourself short or forget that you hold cards in the process as well
  4. the goal is a good fit for everybody, and that includes you; not every job is going to be that good fit for you

but then, I’m not a hiring manager so, really, wtf do I know

(seriously, take everything I say for the anecdotal nonsense that it is)

I found the listing for my job here on Tumblr. At the time I was freelancing and mostly pretty happy with it, but since I wrote my MA thesis on Nerdfighteria and had always kind of wanted to get into video, this looked like a really cool opportunity to work on great stuff & learn a lot.

The application asked for a reel, which I did not have, since I was mostly doing Virtual Assistant work at that time.

A huge part of why I applied was because I thought the application process itself would be a great learning opportunity.

I really didn’t expect to get the job. I can’t stress this part enough. Like, really didn’t even think I’d get an interview.

The whole thing, to me, was just a good exercise. It had been a while since I had applied for anything (I was freelancing on referrals from the get-go) and mostly I was eager to see what, exactly, I could put together in lieu of a reel.

I spent a week working my way through some Lynda lessons on After Effects (this wasn’t my first time using it, but I had only used it for suuuuper basic stuff). Much of what is happening in this video is stuff I figured out how to do while I was making it. That was, again, the point.

I bought a shit ton of green fabric. I rounded up all the lamps I could find. I had a vague knowledge of the fact that shadows = bad for keying, but really knew fuck all about lights. (tbh, lighting is still kind of a mysterious magic trick to me.) I spent probably an hour moving the lamps around, standing in front of them, recording it, and then looking at it until I could find what looked the least shadow-y.

I also watched a SciShow video on the slowest speed setting so that I could try to reverse engineer the basics of what was happening. I was literally just looking at it to see, “ok, but can I do that?” (Answer: not really, but A for effort.)

I wrote a very silly script that was a very carefully selected understanding of how I had been spending my time. This part is super important and broadly applicable whenever you are applying for a job: a huge part of applying for a job is creating a narrative. 

(Important note: this does not mean lying.)

Obviously your life has (probably) not actually been a series of carefully chosen moments leading you to this ONE. JOB. But it’s important to find ways to talk about the things you’ve done that highlight how/why they are relevant. In my experience, humans have a pretty natural tendency to do this narrative reframing of their past as having led them clearly to their future. Use that. What is the version of your trajectory that most sounds like you’ve been gearing up for this job all along, acquiring skills both obvious and unexpected that would be useful here.

That’s the guiding principle of everything I’m saying in this video.

It’s also worth noting, though, that I laid my cards on the table. That is, I wasn’t trying to lie about anything and I was up front about where I was at. It wouldn’t have served anybody to try to be misleading about that fact.

So that was the application process, for me. It’s a tricky balance of being honest but also a carefully selected kind of honest. And keeping in mind that this is as much about deciding whether a company is actually good fit for you as whether you’re a good fit for them. I remember during my college admissions process, one school that I thought I really wanted to go to had a weird religious essay on the form that caught me off guard and made me reevaluate whether that was a good fit. Likewise, I honestly wasn’t sure if I wanted to do the 9-5 thing. Freelancing had lots of great perks that offset some of the overwhelming stress.

Something else that I did, that I recommend with a very cautious asterisk, was googling the people interviewing me. Again, partially this was, “OK, I know these shows they make, and I know vlogbrothers videos, but who are all of the other people who I would spend my days with.”

I had no idea who Nick was before I started, because I never paid much attention to the credits. But he was the one who called me to arrange the interview, so I googled him and found a great interview he did about why Crash Course matters, and there were a few specific things he said that stood out to me as, “yes, this is also why I think this matters and why I want this job.”

The asterisk here is: don’t be creepy. It’s a hard line to walk, but, ya know, don’t talk about your interviewer’s swarm check-ins or whatever.

In my case, I knew that in addition to concentrating on that narrative of how and why I should end up here, I had these other points to hit on in the interview. Again, don’t lie. This isn’t about saying shit solely because you think someone wants to hear it; this was about leveraging a piece of common ground I knew we had.

Lastly, I’d add that it’s good to be careful about how you walk the line between being excited about a company’s work and being a little overzealous. It is, at the end of the day, still a job, and you don’t want to come across as so enthusiastic that maybe you’re missing that point. That’s a really nuanced thing for which I have no easy answers.

A lot of this stuff is just luck. I gave a lot of advice where I could, but, at the same time, there’s also this weird combination of personalities that make a thing work or not. There’s a thing in hiring called the “airport test” which is: “could I be stuck in an airport with this person?” and that is a whole other weird, wholly qualitative element of hiring that ends up making a huge difference.

There’s the official bits and pieces that make up a job application, but then there’s the trickier interpersonal stuff about how that job fits into a team. Something not explicitly stated in my application, but which I’ve since learned mattered is that what I lacked in technical know-how, I made up for in cultural knowledge about YouTube. My manager is a former film school teacher who learned the YouTube stuff on the job; he knew he could teach me anything technical I didn’t know much more easily than he could teach someone the culture in which we create.

IDK. I could legitimately talk about this forever.

i have wanted to design armor for davesprite since forever and finally the day has come when i avoid my responsibilities hard enough to produce this golden nightmare??? its not perfect or anything since i have… little to no armor knowledge lol… just gettin the idea out B)

he keeps his sword in his chest instead of a scabbard l o l

8

stare through the mirror of the self, reflect the face of someone else (the bodyguard au) by bigchickcannibalistic

She’s leaning it. Red lips close – so tantalising close it’s fucking taunting her and it’s fucking unfair. So fucking unfair. Because her heart’s pounding, her hands are already on her hips and her throat is so dry it could be a fucking desert.

And it’s so fucking unfair because this is not how it’s supposed to go, and how can her body just betray her like that, just give in to temptation wrapped in a black dress and with positively thirsty eyes?

4

So this went from “I wonder how the Starfleet gray uniform would look if it was black?” to this headcanon:

What if ST 2009 never happened and Spock had never met Jim at the Academy? Instead he works as a special-class independent Starfleet officer. He spends some time working for Section 31 but Admiral Marcus’s militarization and ruthlessness bothers him and so he leaves shortly before the events of ST Into Darkness. At loose ends, he visits Admiral Pike (his mentor since his Academy days) and the admiral tells him that the Enterprise has returned from its most recent mission and there’s been talk about the Admiralty taking the ship away from Captain Kirk. Both Pike and Spock are upset about this, because Kirk is not only one of Starfleet’s best officers but he also has a reputation for being an open-minded and compassionate person (Literally, everyone wants to work with Jim). Pike tells Spock there might be a place aboard the Enterprise as a Science officer, but more importantly, he thinks Spock should get to know Jim while the young captain is on Earth (you know, purely for employment reasons, lol). Bemused, Spock says he’ll think about it and proceeds to spend most of his time avoiding any social situation that he can. Then the Kelvin Memorial Archive is attacked and Marcus summons a meeting of Starfleet’s top officers. With some maneuvering (and rank-pulling), Pike gets Spock invited as well. Here, Spock meets Jim for the first time and is instantly captivated by the other man’s intelligence and charisma. They don’t get time for anything but introductions but Jim is already one of the few humans that manages to make Spock feel comfortable and accepted. He finds that he has a harder time concentrating on the formal meeting than he normally would and tries to avoid staring at Jim and to ignore the look that Admiral Pike is giving him (the I-know-you-two-would-be-perfect-together look). Marcus (still bitter about Spock leaving Section 31 – no one walks away like that unless he lets them) makes some condescending remark about the Vulcan and Jim, unintimidated by Starfleet’s head admiral, calls him out on it. The confrontation is interrupted by John Harrison’s attack. Amidst the panic and destruction, Spock sees Pike go down and he drags the other man from the room. Injured, Pike loses consciousness quickly (but doesn’t die because I’m still not over him being fridged like that in the movie) and Spock is struck suddenly by the vulnerability of the moment, of how Pike wanted him to meet Jim and how he almost let that chance slip away from him because of his own shyness. He resolves to follow Pike’s advice and request a place aboard the Enterprise, and to perhaps discover what it is that he feels for Jim Kirk.

3

I’m gonna miss you all over again now.

i headcanon the last ghost that Adina the astronomer meets, is the ghost of her girlfriend!

i spent 5 hours at the library today digging through their Special Collections to find out historic info about my house. my next door neighbor, Old Man Dan, has lived on my street for his entire life, close to 80 years. he’s a little paranoid and exaggerates a lot so i never believe anything he says 100% - there’s an abandoned house next to his house and the owner pays a homeless guy in the neighborhood to mow the lawn and cover up graffiti so it doesn’t look totally decrepit, and OMD is convinced that the homeless guy is a serial killer axe murderer, but i’ve talked to him a bunch and he’s a really normal dude? stuff like that. 

ANYWAY, OMD has always insisted that my house (built in 1922) used to be a brothel. there’s pipes sticking out of the wall in my living room and he said that’s proof because that means there was a sink in the room, and apparently brothels have sinks in every room. i didn’t really believe him but thought it was kind of a cool story. i decided to look up my address in the archives and guess fucking what y’all. my house was a brothel for two fucking decades!!!!! it was technically a residential home, 2 different brothels and then a brothel-like cult church, and then a consignment store, and then a law office, and then a house. there are a ton of articles about it but none of them are available publicly or online which is why i couldn’t find anything about it before. i think it’s so fucking cool!!! i’m trying to track down old pictures of the inside and find out more about the people who built it/owned it/operated it.  wish i could post em here but…..it has my address on it so i can’t lol.