this is what i aspire to do

anonymous asked:

I've seen you say a couple times that you don't see or that you're disabled. Do you mind talking about it? I ask because I am an aspiring writer and it is really hard for me. I wanted to know how you managed or what it was like?

I don’t mind talking about it. It’s something that made me who I am.

When I was about 12, my health sort of started to eat itself. I suddenly had a ton of allergies, and there were days I couldn’t get out of bed. I got sick all the time. In freshman year of high school, I suddenly couldn’t see. For a long time a thing had been going on in my eyes, but I guess I didn’t think it was abnormal until it made it impossible for me to see. Basically this hole was kind of growing in my eyes, but it was more like a rainbow.

When I started having trouble with colors and detail vision, my mom freaked out a bit, because at the time, I was an award winning artist who had ideas of going to college for art. Then I started tripping over things, hitting my head, having trouble with depth perception. Then I got sick, and I mean sick.

I spent about 23 hours a day in bed. I had almost constant migraines. I had pain in my entire body. My skin turned yellow. I went to every kind of doctor you can think of and was tested for everything there is. One day, I had about 12 vials of blood drawn. No one knew what was wrong. The eyes weren’t that big a deal at first, because it seemed like I might have something really serious. The first couple of eye doctors I went to kind of looked at me and said “Oh it’s nothing big.” I actually had one guy tell me that my brain was just shutting off my eyes because I wasn’t using them properly. Yeah.

Then finally, my mom took me to a friend of our family who happened to be an eye surgeon. She did a free exam. I’ll never forget it because it was the first time anyone believed me. I’d been told by doctor after doctor that there was nothing wrong with me. I’d been referred to therapists, told I needed depression meds, told I was just going through a phase or needed attention. Then this doctor put on her head gear, looked into my eyes…took off the head gear…got new head gear…looked into my eyes…took off the headgear…got hand held tools…looked into my eyes…and then stared at me with her mouth hanging open.

“I can’t see the back of your eye,” she said. And suddenly the world simultaneously healed itself and flipped upside-fucking-down for me.

Then it was all about my eyes, the one symptom we could see happening. The one that was the most dangerous. But by then it was too late.

What happened is pretty simple: I apparently have some weird recessive DNA. It triggers certain bizarre immune issues at puberty. My immune system decided to attack my body. The eyes are a delicately balanced system. They show symptoms first. My immune system attacked them with a vengeance. They swelled up like balloons. Normal eye pressure is about 14-17. Mine was at a 22 at its best. It put a tremendous amount of pressure on my Retina, specifically my macula, cutting off blood flow like when you sit on your foot. You know those little shadowy things that float across your eyes? They’re called protein floaters. My eyes had produced so many of those that the doctor could not see through them. It was a fog.

They had to find a way to map my eye, to track the damage. Cue the eye exam from hell. I have always been, even before my autoimmune disorder, deathly allergic to melon. Any kind of melon. But now I was allergic to all sorts of shit, fruits vegetables, all kinds of crap. My dad is allergic to contrast dyes. So when the retinologist suggested this dye-based eye exam that is kind of like a CAT scan, my mom said “no”. See, they inject you with this dye and then they flash this weird light in your eyes. It causes the dye to glow, and then they can see the things through the fog. My mom told them I was too sensitive to stuff for that to be safe. The doc assured her they’d put a butterfly in my arm, meaning the vein would be kept open, and a syringe of benedryl was set on the counter. They’d never had anyone react, and they needed the pictures or there was nowhere to go from there.

So they put this dye into me, and it was like I’d been injected with fire, but there was no way around it, and to me, I knew they only had about 90 seconds to get the images they needed. So I sucked it up. finally the burning began to spread. Suddenly my back felt like I was being stabbed, and I suddenly couldn’t speak. I tapped my hands on my mom, then began sneezing spontaneously. My mom lifted my shirt, and I had quarter-sized hives. The nurse said “Stop sneezing on the camera”. Yeah.

My mom went ballistic. The doctor flew up the stairs and gave me the emergency meds. I slid into a dissociation state and nearly out of my chair. They had to prop me against the camera for the next couple minutes and reinject the dye. No other way, you see.

They did this test every few months for a few years.

But then there was treatment. Not much they could do, except try to get the swelling under control. Only way to do that was corticosteroid injections in the eye. Yup. A needle in the eye. No, they don’t knock you out. They numb the surface of the eye with the same numbing drops they give you for the exams and then they come at you with a needle, tell you to look down and to hold still. And you fucking do.

I was 15 when that started.

I went to experimental clinics, labs, and joined studies. I dropped out of those. Why? It’s pretty simple. The first day I came to the exams, I was kept waiting for over two hours. I was taken into a room. I was left there. No information, no talking. Suddenly a man came in followed by a group of people, all in lab coats. He started moving me around like I was a doll and talking like, “The patient presents with…the patient this, the patient that…”

I shoved him back and said, “The patient’s name is Kristina, and she is 16.”

He finished his exam, and when he left, after the students had gone, he took two Q-tips, dipped them in that pink shit your dentist uses to swab your gums before an injection, and SHOVED them under my eyelids with a cocky smirk.

The patient will never be an snotty little bitch again, I guess.

So yeah. Fuck those guys. They gave me two injections in one day, which no one had ever done before, because it was almost impossible to function with two pimple-like bubbles on your eyeballs.

Still my health was bad. Then all of a sudden, when my mom had given up, It just wasn’t anymore. Suddenly, I was fine, and all that was left were the eyes. I went back to school, except now I was blind.

In a few months, I’d lost about 80% of my perfect vision. I was photophobic. I got horrible and constant headaches. I walked with a cane. And not a single fucking teacher believed me, except my civics teacher, who had gone blind at a young age due to some other weird eye disorder, and my physics teacher who was deaf. I had teachers send me to the office for wearing my sunglasses (with a note on file). I had teachers get on my case about having an audio recorder and CD player for my books. I had teachers call me names, make fun of me, make me leave class to photocopy their notes larger, so that I missed the lecture the notes were on. I had teachers take my medications which had to be in my possession because of their time-sensitive nature and constant administration and hide them in their desks as punishment for asking questions or demanding help. I had classmates pick on me, but luckily, I was well-liked, and I was an officer in the ROTC. I even excelled there in spite of my vision, because my Captain believed in my leadership skills.

I always tell this story because I think it is funny. We had this special boot camp we got to go to if we were in the upper ranks of the ROTC. If you joined the military after high school (which I could never do) you got a higher paygrade for having gone through it. Almost like taking a couple JC classes in the military. It was grueling and all physical fitness, obstacle courses, PT, classes, guard duty…fucking blah. Our unit was allowed six participants. I sort of figured that it wasn’t really fair for me to go, even with my high rank (a company XO). To my complete fucking shock, my Captain recommended me to go, cutting out a classmate (and ex) of mine who was higher in rank. The boy went ape-shit. He went on and on about how unfair it was. He even went to the school board. My Captain made his reasons clear; he told them that the academy isn’t about military sponsorship. It’s about skills and quality. He didn’t care if I had a disability. In his eyes I had more innate ability than anyone there because I had worked so hard just to be where I was. The boy was angry. I told my Captain I appreciated the gesture, but honestly, we ought to make it fair. I told him that we should train to meet the PT standards, and that if this kid could make his, but i couldn’t make mine, he should go. I made mine. He didn’t. He complained about that too. At the last minute, we were told one extra person could come because another school had lost one. So he came anyway. The whole time he bitched about me being there. When I got there, the real military officers gave me shit like you wouldn’t believe, because they weren’t used to dealing with disabilities or recognizing that they can’t discriminate against high schoolers by law. The commander of the unit tried to dress me down in front of everybody for wearing sunglasses. I was pretty pleased with myself for telling him off but still sounding respectful. He kept saying “Take off my glasses”. I told him they weren’t his. They were mine, by law, and that if he had a problem with that, he could consult my attorney, the DOJ, and the doctor who prescribed them. He tried to fuck with me. I didn’t say anything except to ask him if he wanted me to have a migraine, because that’s what taking the glasses off means. He was so confused by me he walked away and called my Captain over. There were words. After that, he came up to me once or twice, almost like a test, to ask me if I needed him to slow down or if I was getting around alright. He wasn’t being nice. He was egging me in a condescending tone and with very bullying language. He’s a drill instructor, and you know what, that’s his job. I told him I was fine. But I made a decision: I wasn’t just going to make the female PT marks. I was going to test out of this fucking place at the male PT marks. And I fucking did. That boy…had an asthma attack on the track (I had asthma too, but I worked my ass off while he coasted on his “boyness”) and failed. At the certificate ceremony, the commander came up to me and said I had really impressed him, and that it was a shame I couldn’t enter the Navy. I thanked him, but what I wanted to say was, “Go fuck yourself and take the NAVY with you”. I ended up the Battalion XO Senior year. This would have given me a guaranteed spot in Westpoint if I could have taken it. My Captain cried when he told me he was sorry he had to give it to one of our Company XO’s. I told him that it was best for everyone, because I am not the type of person to enjoy taking orders. I had learned that about myself.

He laughed.

Around Junior year I got people to pay attention. My doctors got the DOJ and the Social Security people involved. A woman came to my school and enforced compliance in a tone of voice I’d never heard anyone but my mother use. She threatened to rain brimstone down on them if they didn’t give me what I needed, and things changed.

My parents wanted me to take a full scholarship to a local school, but I wanted to get away. So I did. I wanted to travel abroad, so i did. And when I was 19, they perfected one of the surgeries they had been working on the entire time I’d been struggling with this.

See, the injections had brought and kept the swelling down, but that meant that the fog was still there (since ocular fluid doesn’t replace), and the structures in the eye had been stretched all to shit, and were laying in my eye like melted plastic wrap. The old surgery was like a blind man hacking with a machete, but the new surgery used fluorescent dyes to track movement. Dyes that wouldn’t kill me. The old surgery had a 50-50 shot at complete loss of vision and made you lay on your face for three weeks. The new was fool proof and took 45 minutes. So, I got one eye done. They swapped out all the fluid and replaced it with saline. They peeled the distorted membrane off the macula. They stitched up my eyeball and gave me a sick metal eye patch. Looked like a fucking space pirate. It was rad.

But the blind spot is still there. The cataracts caused by the steroids are still there. The scars are there.

A few years later I had the other one done too.

My college was great. It took a lot of work getting all my reading done, about 500 pages minimum, per week, done via audio. I used to spend hours at the pool table in our residence hall, listening to my books and practicing. I got pret damn good too, at pool. It was difficult taking notes or working with a note taker. It was scary traveling by myself. It was hard to get people to understand there wasn’t anything WRONG with me. Just that my eyes don’t work even though it seems like I’m normal and fine, and like they should. People always think to be legally blind you have to be completely blind, and they think you’re not going to be able to defend yourself. I’ve been targeted by pickpockets. I’ve been followed by scary dudes. I’ve been treated like shit, laughed at, and accused by full grown adults of faking to get privileges, all because I can look at the place where their head should be and smile at the blank spot there. All because I can walk down a flight of stairs with a few neat tricks I know that have nothing to do with a cane.

But shit…you probably didn’t mean to ask for my life story. I’m going to get back to the point. My writing. What has it done for that? Like how can you be a writer if you can’t fucking see? Technology. It’s been amazing. I can use a computer same as anyone. The Kindle has been a fucking revolution for me because for the first time in a decade and a half I could read without pain and suffering. Just…all the things it does have made life so much easier than it used to be. It got me out of bad relationships with people who used my disability as a control. It gave me a little bit of confidence back. It helped me know I could handle myself.

And really, I think my vision loss had a lot to do with my writing. In some ways it gives me different perspective, sure, but it’s more than that. I was undeclared when I entered college. I didn’t know what I wanted to do. I thought about history or sociology. My mom had a degree in that and she was an English teacher. I wanted art history, but what the fuck was the point in that? Couldn’t see a damn thing. And then I had a class in poetry, and shit…That made sense. I’d always loved language and writing. Always been okay at it. Dorte stuff but never thought about doing it for a living. But then it was like yeah…yeah I’m gonna fucking do that. Just like when I decided to meet the male PT standards.

If it is in you. If you love it. If it defines you and possesses you, it does not matter how fucked up you are. You will find a way. You don’t have a choice. You are that thing. And you’ll adapt. You just have to let yourself. You have to keep pushing. You have to learn how to handle frustration. you have to train yourself into stamina. You just keep going. I’m nowhere near as successful as I want to be. I’m still going. I hope I get even better. I hope I can say things that make truth more obvious, or that help people put words to things they have always wanted to say.

I don’t need my eyes to be a fucking firestorm. That’s just me. Eyes don’t mean shit.

So keep going. Keep doing whatever you need to. Do it better and better. Bend yourself around it. People who see you struggle will think they’re lucky, but you and I know the truth: they’re not even close to the kind of strong you are. Not even a little bit.

Admin announcement

Aights I’ve been receiving a few messages re this issue so I thought I’ll do up a proper post addressing it.

4 years back, I’d set up this blog not just to share creepypastas with you lot, but also to provide a platform for aspiring writers to showcase their work. So you can understand that it’s a massive problem when some of yous messaged me highlighting reservations about sending in story submissions because of the fear that the submission’s grammar, vocab, sentence structure etc aren’t up to par.  

But listen, I get it. Tumblr is a global thing. English isn’t a first language for some of you. And guess what? It’s okay. In fact, most of the stories (both submissions and postings) you see on here have undergone basic grammar and formatting edits by yours truly. I don’t mind doing it. Editing has become a thing I expect myself to do before I post up any story.

So to make things clear - as long as your story isn’t entirely incoherent, has a decent plot, and abides to the guidelines on the submission page, feel free to send it in. If there’s a problem with it, I’ll message you and we’ll sort it out together.

Hope this clears it up.

-Dad

anonymous asked:

What do you want to be when you grow up, in terms of future career aspirations?

idk man. after the summer i’ll be entering a different school for three years before college and while i’ve decided on the school i want to apply to idk whether i want to go into dead languages, biology or physics. as to what happens after that idk. i’ll be in NY this summer for a while and other than that i might be interning at a genetics research facility here (which is definitely something i’m interested in) and i’m hoping that during that time i’ll make up my mind about stuff. atm nothing feels realistic or practical and im just eh :P

10

Kiki’s Delivery Service is one of those movies that I feel any aspiring artist should see. The struggle of Kiki in this movie is one that ANYONE who wants to further themselves goes through, that transition from taking what you love to do to something that you make a living off of.

As artists we have all been in the place where Kiki is. That place where we can’t draw anything right, can’t paint anything right, can’t sculpt anything right, that place where everything comes out wrong over and over and we begin to question if we’re actually good enough for the talents and skills that used to come to us like second nature when we were just using them for fun. That place where we want to give up because we suddenly can’t ‘fly’ like we want to, because everything seems too difficult to do that. 

But that doesn’t mean it isn’t there, just because it isn’t working right then and there when you want it to be. If you can always fly, then it wouldn’t make those times when you did as special. It isn’t necessarily easy to grow up, nor is it necessarily easy to live with the artistic struggle of losing inspiration. But you can’t just throw up your hands and say ‘No, I can’t do it anymore’ because you’ll NEVER fly if you do that. 

You gotta wobble before you stand. 

You know who did the teen hero thing right? Kim Possible, that’s who. She never messed around with that secret identity thing or with not letting her parents or friends know what she was doing so she never had to deal with, “Oh, I’m gonna miss this important family event to save the world”  or, “What’ll happen if my friends find out my secret identity?” bullcrap. It was like, “Mom, Dad. I gotta go deal with this Drakken sitch,” and they’d just be like, “Have fun. Tell Ron we said hi.” She had that hero/personal life balance thing on lock. I aspire to have my life as in balance as Kim Possible.

The 7 Elements of a SCENE

There are few things as soul-crushing in the writing process (at least to me) than getting a bunch of characters in a room with the intention of something happening, then the characters proceed to stand around and stare at each other.  

Or worse, look at you like this. 

My characters didn’t know why they were there. I didn’t know why they were there either. I had no clue what they were supposed to be doing, so I’d start throwing random instructions at them: “Fight, characters! You guys should fight now! Maybe fighting will make this event have a purpose!” Which inevitably resulted in characters going through the motions of battle for no apparent reason, like they had all lost their minds.

What was the problem? I didn’t know how to write a scene. I didn’t know what a scene was. I had a vague definition that it was something about changing scenery, or just “something happening”.

It’s not. And once I learned what a scene was, my characters got to stop pummeling each other, while wishing they could pummel me. 

So what is a scene? 

The definition of a scene is kind of like the definition of a story. Story is change, a massive change in the life of your main character. A scene is change too, but much smaller, and part of that huge story change. You couldn’t have the BIG change without these tiny changes. Thus, a scene is not switching scenery. It’s not flipping to a new Character’s POV. It’s one segment of change, which triggers the next change, which triggers the next, which gradually build into sequences, which build into Acts, which build into story. 

So what goes into a scene? How does it work?

1. Alternating Charges

If a scene opens positive, it will turn negative by the end. If it opens negative, it will end positive. Simple. 

2. Character Goals

Everybody in a scene wants something. If they don’t want anything, they shouldn’t be in the scene. And these characters, with their often opposing goals, are going to employ different tactics on each other to get what they want. Which creates …

3. Escalating Conflict

Conflict is created when one character wants one thing and another wants something else, right? So the characters in the scene are each pushing for something different, each new tactic increasing in determination. And what are these actions called?  

4. Beats

The beats of a scene are exchanges of action and reaction. One character does something, another character reacts. All exchanges (beats) are pushing the scene onward, building tension and conflict, until finally …

5. Turns & Revelations

The scene turns. The positive has changed to negative. Something has been discovered. The story has spun in a new direction.

6. Connection to Story Objective

Every scene must be connected to the BIG goal of the story, the main character is taking small actions to reach that big goal. If it isn’t obviously connected to this big plot, it won’t make sense. Your reader won’t know why the heck they’re reading the scene. Which brings us to … 

7. Logic & Necessity  

Every scene must be necessary. It must be able to be linked with the previous scene. “Because that happened in the previous scene, THIS must happen in this scene.”

So! To see how that all works, let’s break down a scene from Tangled. (Because I used it in the last post to map out how a premise works, and my little writer heart can’t resist symmetry.)

Which scene? The one right after this happens: 

Opening Charge: Positive. She’s realized everything. 

Rapunzel’s Goal: Rise up against her mother – finally. 

Gothel’s Goal: Regain control.

Escalating Conflict: They’re fighting over who controls Rapunzel, and this battle causes them to go from “mother and daughter” to “enemies”. The conflict builds nicely in this scene, causing the story turn.

Connection to Story Objective: Throughout the movie, the big thing Rapunzel wants is freedom, she wants her life to begin, she wants to have a new dream. This is the moment she figures out how to do that; it’s not escaping the tower, it’s escaping Gothel’s control over her.

So! Here’s the scene.

Beat 1

“Rapunzel? Rapunzel, what’s going on up there?”

Ignores her. Still processing the tremendous implications of this revelation. 

Beat 2

“Are you alright?" 

"I’m the lost princess.” (Dumbfounded. Almost whispering it to herself.)


Beat 3

“Oh, please speak up Rapunzel! You know how I hate the mumbling.” (Bullying.)

“I am the lost princess! Aren’t I?” (Fighting back. She will not be bullied anymore.)

Beat 4

Gothel stares, stunned. She’s rendered temporarily speechless, because her secret’s been revealed finally, and her victim is actually fighting against her.


“Did I mumble, Mother? Or should I even call you that?” (Accusing. Drawing herself up taller. Looking down on Gothel and glaring. She’s seeing her clearly for the first time in her life.)

Beat 5

After a pause, thinking up a tactic. “Oh, Rapunzel, do you even hear yourself? How could you ask such a ridiculous question?” (Laughs. Ridicules. Attempts to make her feel childish, dumb, worthy of being mocked. Tactics which have always worked. She even begins to hug her.)


Rapunzel pushes her. “It was you! It was all you!” (Still accusing and angry, but pain is beginning to show. It’s almost like she’s giving her a chance to explain herself.)


Beat 6

“Everything I did was to protect you.” (And Gothel doesn’t say anything redeeming. She’s holier than thou, regal, bestowing kindness on an ungrateful, stupid child. Trying to control through guilt.)

Rapunzel rams her out of the way. 

Beat 7

“Rapunzel!” (Shouting. Now trying anger.)

“I’ve spent my entire life hiding from people who would use me for my power …” (Leaves her.)

Beat 8

"Rapunzel!” (Still trying the anger angle.)

“But I should have been hiding from you.” (Throwing the truth at her.)

Beat 9

“Where will you go? He won’t be there for you.” (She’s tried everything else. It’s time to attack her heart.)

“What did you do to him?” (Fear)

Beat 10

“That criminal is to be hanged for his crimes.” (She’s keeping up the disapproving mother act, but striking her right where it will hurt her most.)

“No.” (She’s stopped. Shrinking in on herself. Staring, horrified. And Gothel thinks she’s won.)

Beat 11

“Now, now.  It’s alright. Listen to me. All of this is as it should be.” She goes to pat Rapunzel’s head, a gesture symbolic of her superiority, her physical, mental, and emotional control over her victim.


Rapunzel grabs Gothel’s wrist. “No! You were wrong about the world. And you were wrong about me! And I will never let you use my hair again!" 

Beat 12

Gothel wrenches free, stumbling backwards in shock and anger, breaking the mirror in the process. 

Rapunzel walks away. She’s escaped Gothel emotionally now.

Beat 13

"You want me to be the bad guy? Fine. Now I’m the bad guy.” (Well, now emotional control is over. It’s time to start stabbing Rapunzel’s boyfriend.)

This action has no reaction, interestingly. It leaves us hanging, a cliffhanger created with only beats. 

Closing Charge: Negative. She’s now a full-fledged villain, the motherly persona shed, and she’s determined to get what she wants whatever the cost. 

Turn: It changed from positive to negative,  and now we’ve got a Flynn-stabbing witch to deal with.  

Revelation: She’s always been evil. She has always been the bad guy. The motherly act was just that, an act. 

Logic & Necessity: This scene fits with the previous scene, and the one that follows.     

Though I’ve seen these concepts in many books, the place I first learned about it (and the best resource for scene design in my opinion) is the book Story by Robert McKee. It’s helped me countless times, is one of my favorite books on storytelling, and I highly recommend it if you write anything.

I realize that these definitions were a little vague, so I’ll be explaining things more thoroughly in subsequent posts. 

anonymous asked:

Dear Duke, I have noticed something about my writing: I do not know how to conduct a dialogue. I do not know how to add an emotional "burden" to the discussion. It does not sound believable what I write. To me, it seems more like a lecture than a simple conversation. I just wanted to write engaging more with the emotional side of my characters than with the intellectual. How can I do it?

Hi! You’re in the right place because dialogue is actually my favorite thing to write and any book of mine you pick up will probably be like at least 40% people talking. Idk if this is because I did so much theatre or because I just can’t shut up, but it’s high time I did a real post about it, so:

Advice for Aspiring Authors: On Dialogue

  1. You need it so don’t resist it. Books that are just huge chunks of prose are exhausting, and if you never use dialogue you’re either (1) summarizing or (2) writing a really boring book, and either way the the result is the same. Your reader is going to be bored. Choosing the right scenic mode is important and sooner or later people are going to have to speak in the moment. 
  2. Don’t stress about speaker tags. Putting this at the top because a lot of new writers seem to get hung up on it. But I’ve already addressed this, so read this post here. Pro-tip? If you’re writing a conversation between two people or even three, you often don’t need speaker tags at all. I recently wrote a conversation that takes place over the phone which consists of about 25 lines exchanged and didn’t use a single speaker tag because it was, in all instances, obvious who was doing the talking. Later in the same MS I have a really chaotic hospital scene where like twelve people are yelling at the same time and interrupting each other and there are no speaker tags because idgaf if anybody knows who’s saying what. It should feel like chaos. (If you want a really great example of this, pick up a copy of William Faulkner’s Sanctuary and read the funeral scene.) Readers are smart. They’ll figure it out.
  3. Different people speak in different ways. Who a character is will often determine how they speak. For instance, Theodore von Wammelspout, Crown Prince of Prosenstatz, is probably going to have a very different dialect than Paw Paw O’Halloran, Louisiana shrimp fisherman. (If you want a better example of what I’m talking about, watch the movie Kingsman and pay attention to how and when Eggsy switches dialects, or read the prologue to The Taming of the Shrew and pay attention to the immediate tonal shift in Christopher Sly’s dialogue when he wakes up from a drunken stupor thinking he’s a lord.) Think about a character’s origins and upbringing and backstory when deciding how they talk.
  4. But stay away from writing dialect unless you really know what you’re doing. Don’t try to phonetically write a character’s accent or dialect unless you’re a linguist, because a lot of dropped consonants and deliberate misspellings can be really difficult to read, come out like you’re trying too hard, or even end up looking vaguely racist. If a character has an accent, find a way to tell us they have an accent and then spell all their dialogue correctly. There are, of course, exceptions to the rule–i.e, if a phonic misunderstanding is crucial to the story. But basically, unless you’re writing Trainspotting, don’t do this. What’s much better and much more effective is to describe how a character says something or what their voice sounds like. What’s the texture? The color? The temperature? A warm, rough, slow voice belongs to a different character than a cold, high, slick voice does. Or maybe the same character can switch from one to the other. Give your character’s voice the same attention you would give their body or their habits or anything else.
  5. It’s a character speaking, not the narrator. Each character should have their own voice, in the same way that each story will have a slightly different narrator, even if it’s a neutral third person narrator. Writing is all about voice and style, and part of the challenge is that you as the writer have to be a mockingbird and be able to speak in as many different voices as you have characters. It will take practice. It will require a lot of questions asked, such as “Who never says a bad word? Who swears like a sailor? Who talks in a constant, uninterrupted stream and who hardly says a word?” For an exercise, write out a plain uninteresting sentence like, “He was on his way home from the store when he got a flat tire,” the way the narrator would say it, and then rewrite it in every character’s voice. Because one character might say it just like that–”I was on my way home from the store and I got a flat tire”–and another might say, “You’re not going to fucking believe this. Okay, so I’m on my way home from the store, because we’re out of beer again, because Steve was supposed to go get more and he didn’t, the dickhead–and what happens? Well, obviously, because this worthless excuse of a city can’t be bothered to keep the roads clear, I drive right through a patch of broken glass and BANG! Blow a tire. Swear to God, I thought it was a gunshot, I nearly ran my car into a telephone pole.” If all your characters sound alike or sound like the narrator or (worse) sound like you, it’s time to stop and reevaluate. 
  6. Characters don’t speak for you. Look, unless you’re writing a really boring story it’s going to have a bunch of people in it with a bunch of different ideas and some of them should believe things that you don’t agree with or speak in a way you find objectionable. Characters are sometimes going to have to say things you find morally deplorable and they have to say them with conviction. I recently wrote a scene where my FMC’s boyfriend and her dad argue about what they’re going to do about her, like she’s not a grown-ass woman who can take care of herself. And they both say things that are utterly atrocious and that if I heard a man say in real life, I would probably punch him in the face. But that’s important. In fiction, you gotta tell it all and tell it like it is. Fiction isn’t true but it should be honest. Not every character can agree with you or with each other. (This is a big part of the reason that authorial intent is a flawed concept. An author who depicts something isn’t necessarily condoning or endorsing it.) You should be writing about difficult shit and writing about it from every vantage point and using dialogue to do that. You don’t need to agree with angelic equality crusader Nancy and homophobic Uncle Jeff equally but they need to be equally convincing. Write disagreements. Write arguments. Let characters fight and get pissed and tell each other to fuck off. It’s honest, and it’s interesting. Conflict is good.
  7. Incomplete sentences are your best friend. So are run-ons. That scene I mentioned that was 25 lines with no speaker tags? There’s also not a complete sentence in that whole exchange. We rarely speak in full correct sentences, even if we know perfectly well that what we’re saying isn’t grammatically perfect. So something like this: 
            “Seen my keys?”
            “In the basket.”
    Totally acceptable. People are lazy. They talk in fragments. Dialogue doesn’t have to be correct, because it often isn’t. Stick commas and dashes wherever the fuck you want to mimic the pattern of speech. Worry about what’s natural, not what’s correct. Sometimes what goes unsaid is just as interesting as what does get said. For instance, if Joe turns to Carol and starts to say, “Have you ever thought about–” and then never finishes the sentence, that’s going to keep a reader wondering. Has she ever thought about what? In much the same way, you can have a character ramble for an entire paragraph in an epic run-on sentence if that’s the way they talk, or if they’re distressed or upset and trying to get the words out. The last book I finished has a chapter at the end where one character literally talks without interruption for nine pages. And as insane as that sounds it’s actually totally necessary because she’s telling a story that’s important for the readers and the other characters to hear but it’s a hundred times better to hear it in her own voice, grammatical correctness be damned.
  8. Don’t try too hard to be eloquent. How many people do you know in real life who spout off perfectly articulate declarations of their feelings? Probably none. They ramble and stall and repeat themselves. Real-life conversations are not movie conversations. They’re not smooth. They’re not perfectly timed. A character just saying “Fuck me” because they have no idea what else to say is perfectly plausible (and also a great opportunity for comedy). Here’s an exercise if you’re having trouble: Make two columns on a page, and on one side write out what this character is trying to say (i.e, “I love you.” “I’ve been trying to tell you for years.” “But I’m afraid you don’t want me to.”) and on the other write out what they actually say (i.e., “I really hope you’ll stay.” “You know you’re always welcome to stay.” “I don’t want you to feel like you have to stay. Just that you can. If you want to.”) Sometimes the juxtaposition between what we’re trying to say and what actually comes out is so important. So don’t worry about perfect articulation or doing justice to the “emotional burden.” Worry about the intent and the impact and how those two things align–or don’t.
  9. Read it out loud. This is one of the most important things teachers in playwriting workshops will tell you to do. Read it out loud. If it feels awkward or unnatural, it probably is. Thus also to dialogue in prose fiction. Even better option? Get a couple of friends to read it for you. This will work wonders for helping you figure out what feels awkward.
  10. HAVE FUN WITH IT. When I say dialogue is far and away my favorite thing to write, I’m not kidding at all. You can learn so much about a character or how two characters interact by how they talk to each other. Do they tease, do they nag, do they finish each other’s sentences? Do they use slang, do they slur, do they talk about celebrities they’ve never met as if they’ve known them for years and they’re the best of friends? Let their personalities shine through, because when characters speak is the only time they’re not getting filtered through a narrator, even if that narrator is themselves. Dialogue provides some of the most poignant moments of characterization you’ll ever get. So play with it. Try the same line fifty different ways until it feels right. Let your characters speak for themselves.

Good luck! Go forth and write great dialogue and have a blast doing it.

Theory Time... 5H drama.....

We got an interview not long ago, from 5H’s management, Maverick. In the interview they were asked about Fifth Harmony, and their response was less than upbeat. They basically said, the group environment wasn’t exactly conducive for making friends. They were telling us the dynamic within the group was not good. They also said, the five girls together were really hard to manage. (cry me a river)

My first thought when I read those words were, “This is the beginning of the end of Fifth Harmony." Management is telling us what they plan on doing, and they are going to use "group dynamics” as the reason.

Keep reading

the poets were wrong.

you don’t burn and there are no tornadoes in your chest,
your hands don’t hold galaxies or stars
and your anger isn’t a volcanic god
ready to smite every enemy.
the moon doesn’t love you and neither do the stars,
but the earth does, in its own way, i guess.

see, you are human, my dear,
born to destroy and to take and to make,
born to learn and to watch. you observe the stars;
they do not observe you.

you run from tornadoes or you chase them,
you do not become them. your anger is just anger
an emotion to control or be controlled by;
volcanoes can stay dormant for years
but you are never still.

and why would the moon love you?
why would the stars?
they are too far away to be swayed by a pretty face,
but the earth lives under your feet, it feels you dance
to the beat it drums out in thunder and rain.

you are human, fragile
and while your skin is weak your heart beats strong.
it might not hold hurricanes but it does hold love,
and this can be just as deadly.
your anger won’t ever level cities
but it can topple friendships
and they amount to the same thing.

the poets were wrong.
you are not out of this world,
you are of it and beloved to it,
and you are still special.


HUMAN NATURE // l.s.

  • Saturn: If you give up your dream because of me
  • It wasn't the right one to begin with
  • Saturn: I only want you to make your aspirations real
  • Saturn: I want you to physically see what you have accomplished
  • Saturn: I want to stand on top of the world with me
  • Saturn: If you are saying you 'can't do this', because, 'I told you so'
  • You are not listening to me properly
  • I didn't say you couldn't do it
  • I said I wanted you to do it with the dignity and exquisiteness I know you possess
  • I said I want you to do it as well as we planned
  • When you were a star
  • And you knew you could do everything

anonymous asked:

would it be too rude to ask for more lance and pidge headcanons

not rude at all my guy this is all i do with my life

  • The Meme Team™
  • lance, smushing pidge’s face to his chest: “never talk to me or my child ever again”
    • alternatively: pidge pretends to be lance’s kid whenever he tries to flirt w someone
  • lance secretly aspires to one day be as savage as pidge
  • “excuse me sir I lost my friend lance, can I make an announcement?” *pidge leans into the intercom* “goodbye you little shit”
  • lance is horrified by the state of pidge’s everything. you don’t sleep a full 8 hours a night?? you don’t exfoliate??? and how could you just forget to trim your nails what the fuck are you a cat-
    • he detangles pidge’s hair regularly and angrily
    • hunk walks in on this once, vaguely recalls a documentary on monkeys’ grooming habits that he saw on animal planet once, and then leaves
  • “i have a problem” “you have many but go on”
  • actually a pretty horrifying duo. usually use their power for dumb pranks but one time some aliens make the mistake of capturing the two of them together and it takes them like five minutes to blow up their base
  • constant mecha anime jokes
    • “get in the robot, lance”
    • “don’t believe in yourself pidge. believe in the me that believes in you”
    • one day lance wakes up in a cold sweat and barges into pidge’s room. “pidge. pidge oh my god” “lance what the fuck” “pidge we’re piloting a fucking gundam oh my god”
  • *one walks into the room* the other: “yikes”

Theory: Fukurodani To Win Nationals

alternatively: this is a shounen sports manga so literally anyone could win for any reason whatsoever but a Fukurodani win would not be the worst possible choice and could in fact be an excellent choice

The tricky thing about theorizing who could win nationals is that none of the teams talk about winning nationals. It’s all about the act of going and what they will do there. Past winners aren’t even mentioned. But we’re 234 chapters into this. For the story, for the characters, and for myself as a fan, I want our current teams to get what they want and deserve, but I want them to aspire for more in the future. Or as Coach Nekomata says in ch.96:

[Note: I’m sorry not sorry for this monstrosity of a post. This is by no means a definitive edition. Beware that below the cut is image heavy and full of spoilers.]


Keep reading

In Defense of the Coffee Shop AU, U.S. Election Edition

It occurs to me that we need our fiction, more than ever, to be what we think the world could be. We need aspirational fiction. What I feel like I need to do is give people a glimpse of a world that is better. Like, it doesn’t have to be like this. It can be better. And I’m not saying that there is no room for gritty realism, by all means, tell me exactly how awful it’s going to get, make me comprehend it. But what good does that do me if I feel despair and no hope and see no alternative? 

There needs to be an alternative. There needs to be a belief that the world can be better than what we’ve been given. If the only thing I can lift up to myself as a signpost of that hope is a piece of fiction, then that piece of fiction is important. It means that I can imagine something better, and if I can imagine something better, then I can try to help us get there

I am resisting the pull of my over-active imagination to write me only the dark scenario. I find myself in the wrong AU. I need to write me a better one. I want to try to write all of us a better one. And it is no mockery to think that that can start with a fluffy piece of fiction. Story-telling is how we change the world. A weird one just got told to us, the most elaborate piece of fiction I’ve ever seen, a fiction that won a presidency. We need to tell the counter-story. 

Write aspirational fiction. Write the world you want to see. It is actually important.  

Hamilton, an American Musical: a summary
  • Alexander Hamilton: Damn, this kid survived and then some
  • Aaron Burr, Sir: I have no idea what I'm doing
  • My Shot: But it seems like none of you do either!
  • The Story of Tonight: We have heartwarming aspirations
  • The Schuyler Sisters: Fuck the patriarchy
  • Farmer Refuted: Bro the king's not going to do anything
  • You'll Be Back: Oh shit, I guess he is
  • Right Hand Man: Desk work??? You've got to be kidding
  • Winter's Ball: I think we're drunk
  • Helpless: This is the best love story ever
  • Satisfied: Never mind
  • The Story of Tonight Reprise: We're definitely drunk
  • Wait For It: Surprise, surprise! I do have ambitions!
  • Stay Alive: THIS FUCKING GUY
  • Ten Duel Commandments: Could this be foreshadowing? Nah
  • Meet Me Inside: I done fucked up
  • That Would Be Enough: Apparently my wife doesn't mind
  • Guns and Ships: We're kicking ass. Alex! Come kick ass with us!
  • History Has Its Eyes on You: Okay son time to tell you how the world works
  • Yorktown: Everyone's kicking ass except the British
  • What Comes Next?: Time for King George to have a hissy fit
  • Dear Theodosia: This love is so pure oh my god
  • Non-Stop: I'm still kicking ass but now I'm a lawyer
  • What'd I Miss: All-American dance party
  • Cabinet Battle #1: Well I lost that argument AND control of my emotions!
  • Take a Break: Sorry fam I have to stay here and obsess over banks
  • Say No to This: An affair? Well, I'm only a politician with a lot of money. What could possibly go wrong?
  • The Room Where It Happens: Politics are frustrating
  • Schuyler Defeated: Is this about me? Of course it is. Everything's about me
  • Cabinet Battle #2: Screw France we gotta look out for America
  • Washington On Your Side: We like to call ourselves the Bitter Squad
  • One Last Time: You guys are exhausting I'm out
  • I Know Him: Your baby nation antics are amusing to me
  • The Adams Administration: I will roast everyone
  • We Know: Okay now I know what could go wrong
  • Hurricane: My past is sad
  • The Reynolds Pamphlet: Turns out I will also roast myself
  • Burn: Alex is a self centered little shit
  • Blow Us All Away: I'm my father's son: combative and full of pride
  • Stay Alive Reprise: Whoops
  • It's Quiet Uptown: There could not be a worse coincidence than that stupid pamphlet and our son's death
  • The Election of 1800: Okay I know I'm supposed to be grieving but here's one final roast for y'all
  • Your Obedient Servant: Passive aggressive fight turns into real fight
  • Best of Wives and Best of Women: The hell are you going boy
  • The World Was Wide Enough: Whoops Pt 2
  • Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story: Eliza wins the prize for best character growth you can all go home
3

Interview With @danaterrace by  Fulle Circle Magazine

Storyboard Artist, Animator and Director Dana Terrace stops by Fülle Circle to discuss the race cars, lasers and aeroplanes that may or not be in her next big project (with Showrunner Matthew Youngberg and Co-Producer/Head Writer Frank Angones), Disney XD’s nostalgic return to Duckburg in a reimagining of the 1987 series, DuckTales. We also discuss Gravity Falls, her childhood obsession with cats, the appeal of Carl Barks, and her advice for aspiring animators.  

Jason Anders: Do you remember the first cartoon you fell in love with as a kid?
Dana Terrace: I had always watched cartoons as a kid, but the first thing I obsessed over was Pokémon. It was 1999, I was eight years old, and I wanted a furry friend with magical powers to beat people up for me. I watched everything else but I never missed a new Pokémon episode. I didn’t know what an animator was, but I knew “I want to do that - whatever it is.”
JA: What first influenced you to start drawing and what were your favorite things to draw?
DT: I don’t know when I started. I’ve been drawing since I could hold a pencil. What encouraged me to continue was that every time I sat down with a marker and pad of paper the adults would leave me alone. I was an anti-social kid so when I discovered this trick I used it as much as I could.
I was big into cats. Every character was either a cat or a cat-girl in a dress being chased by ghosts and dinosaur ghosts. One of my favorite drawings from 1998 shows a cat-girl swinging by a vine over a pit of lava, and the cat is saying “this SUKS” (suks crossed out twice and rewritten in all caps).

JA: Was DuckTales a show that you were into as a kid?
DT: Nope! I never watched it until I was hired onto the show. I watched a bunch of episodes for study but had a hard time with the relationship between Webby and the triplets. It felt hateful and mean. That’s something I love about the writers on our show, they treat Webby like one of the kids and make her a joy to board! Besides that, I’ve read a lot of Carl Barks/Don Rosa comics. Those are just delightful.

I feel like I should add a caveat: Though I didn’t grow up with the original show, literally everyone else on the crew did - all of the writers, board artists, designers, directors, etc. They are very aware of keeping the “spirit” of the show intact. I just wanted to work on a show with cute animals going on adventures.

JA: Where are you from originally?
DT: I’m from New Haven County in Connecticut. Then I was in NYC for four years to go to college.
JA: Is college a path you’d encourage for those who want to pursue a career in animation?
DT: My time at School of Visual Arts was a mix of experiences. It wasn’t perfect. I made some great friends there and they had the facilities I needed to make my own short films. However, I found the program lacking in actual knowledge of how the industry works. Many of the teachers hadn’t worked in the industry for over twenty years and were very out of the loop with how things worked. Of course there were exceptions; I had some amazing animation/layout teachers and a couple of figure-drawing teachers who completely changed the way I approached drawing. But because we were so far away from LA studios it was hard for us to imagine what an active professional looked like. I learned a lot from my peers, online tutorials, and students from CalArts and Gobelins that I would talk to in forums.

I don’t want to discourage anyone from doing anything just because of my singular experience. It all comes down to the individual. Some people have amazing experiences in school, I didn’t. Art school isn’t for everyone, especially those in financial straights, but there are alternatives! There are a million online classes students can take that offer a solid animation education by current working professionals at a fraction of the cost. It takes a lot of hard work and dedication to strike out on your own but it isn’t impossible. I hope students look at both options very carefully to decide what’s best for them!

JA: How did you land a job working on Gravity Falls, and what was your immediate reaction to the offer?
DT: It was strange! I hadn’t watched Gravity Falls before they contacted me and sent a storyboarding test. Someone on the crew found my Tumblr and liked my drawings enough to email me! I did the test and they immediately wanted to bring me on as a revisionist. At the same time I was waiting to hear back from Steven Universe for a position. I was leaning more towards SU, I was a fan of Rebecca Sugar ever since I saw her films at SVA, but they took too long to reply and I needed a job so I half-heartedly accepted Gravity Falls’ offer. I think it turned out alright.
JA: What is your fondest memory of working on Gravity Falls?
DT: There are so many good memories on Gravity Falls - drinking with the crew and playing Smash Bros., drunkenly playing Smash Bros. with the crew, etc.
One memory I go back to is storyboarding on “Dipper and Mabel Vs the Future.” There was a scene where Mabel is sadly looking through her scrapbook while Stan attempts to cheer her up. It was a real “father/daughter” kind of moment and, having lost my own father around Mabel’s age, I poured my heart into it. I don’t know how much of that came out in the finished animation, especially after some things were cut for time, but it was the first time I didn’t get notes from my director. If I went back I’d change a million things, but I remember being very satisfied and proud at that moment. JA: How did the opportunity of working on the new DuckTales present itself?
DT: The Line Producer for DuckTales was also LP for season two of Gravity Falls. When she heard I was looking for work in November 2015 she hit me up! I was originally offered a boarding position, but I had just finished boarding for a few projects that left a bad taste in my mouth. So I took a chance and asked if they had a director’s position open. Fortunately, they did - and even more fortunately, they were desperate enough to try me out!
JA: What do you love most about DuckTales, both the new and original show?
DT: I can’t say much about the original show, but I’m a big fan of the Carl Barks comics. What I love the most is the way he drew Scrooge and Donald. Their closed-eye designs were so cute and their smiles so appealing. Happily, we’ve integrated some of those Barks-isms into our designs.
I feel so biased talking about the show I worked on. Of course I love it! The scripts are funny, the characters have depth, and best of all Webby has an actual goddamn personality besides “girl”. She’s my favorite character to work with. I think people will appreciate what we’ve done with her.

JA: What can we expect from the new series?
DT: Same as the old; really cute animal characters going on adventures, but with a little more personality for the kids and a little more depth for every character all-around. I think people will like it!
JA: What is your all-time favorite piece of animation?
DT: If you’re talking about animation as in “which piece of pure context-less piece of art do I like”, I go back to the scene in Ghost in the Shell when Major Kusanagi’s arms are being ripped apart while trying to defeat a terrorist robot, or the marching parade in Paprika, or just the little looped GIFs made by talented friends like Jeff Liu, Spencer Wan and Toniko Pantoja.
Just for the sake of narrowing it down, my favorite animated movie is Princess Mononoke. It’s stunning, heart-breaking and otherworldly. Without fail I start crying ten minutes into the film every time. I’m awful to watch it with. JA: What inspires you?
DT: The inevitability of death! Before I die I want to make sure I put 120% into my passion.
JA: What advice would you give to artists who are just starting out and trying to get their foot in the door?
DT: I say this all the time: DRAW! Draw every goddamn day. Or write every day, if that’s your thing, and show your work to people, online and offline. Learn how to take critique and never let yourself hide behind “styles”. That’s how amateur artists stay amateurs. If you want to get into animation it will behoove you to be versatile. At the end of the day, the quality of your work is all that matters.
JA: How would you describe yourself in three words?
DT: Very. Tired. UUUGHHH.

Hi friends! I’m back with another quote masterpost. As an aspiring author, fellow writers never cease to amaze me with their wisdom, with their humbleness, but most importantly, with their words. These quotes aren’t necessarily motivational, but nevertheless, I had a great time researching the authors and their quotes. Though I did as much research as I saw necessary, everyone makes mistakes, so if you think one of the quotes in this post belong to another person, be sure to let me know! I made this with bullet journals in mind, but do with these quotes what you wish. I hope you enjoy, and all of you have a great day!

ERNEST HEMINGWAY

“The world breaks everyone, and afterwards, some are strong at the broken places.”

“But man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated.”

“Courage is grace under pressure.”

“The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.”

“Never go on trips with anyone you do not love.”

“Every day above earth is a good day.”

“The world is a fine place and worth the fighting for and I hate very much to leave it.”

“Time is the least thing we have of.”

“When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen.”

“My aim is to put down on paper what I see and what I feel in the best and simplest way.”

“When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature.”

“Do not worry. You have always written before and you will write now.”

MARK TWAIN

“Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life.”

“If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.”

“Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest.”

“Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please.”

“Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.”

“‘Classic’ - a book which people praise and don’t read.”

“Never put off ‘til tomorrow what may be done day after tomorrow just as well.”

“Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.”

“Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else.”

“Sanity and happiness are an impossible combination.”

“I have never let my schooling interfere with my education.”

“Never tell the truth to people who are not worthy of it.”

MAYA ANGELOU

“We may encounter many defeats but we must not be defeated.”

“If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.”

“Prejudice is a burden that confuses the past, threatens the future and renders the present inaccessible.”

“When someone shows you who they are, believe them the first time.”

“Nothing will work unless you do.”

“You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.”

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”

“Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope.”

“My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.”

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.”

“If you have only one smile in you, give it to the people you love.”

“In diversity, there is beauty and there is strength.”

VIRGINIA WOOLF

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”

“A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction.”

“You cannot find peace by avoiding life.”

“For most of history, Anonymous was a woman.”

“If you do not tell the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.”

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”

“Books are the mirrors of the soul.”

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.”

“Growing up is losing some illusions, in order to acquire others.”

“When you consider things like the stars, our affairs don’t seem to matter very much, do they?”

“As long as she thinks of a man, nobody objects to a woman thinking.”

“I am rooted, but I flow.”

J.R.R. TOLKIEN

“I warn you, if you bore me, I shall take my revenge.”

“Not all those who wander are lost.”

“All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.”

“If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.”

“Faithless is he that says farewell when the road darkens.”

“It’s a dangerous business going out your front door.”

“Courage is found in unlikely places.”

“It’s the job that’s never started as takes longest to finish.”

“Still round the corner there may wait, A new road or a secret gate.”

“Little by little, one travels far.”

“There is some good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for.”

“I will not say: do not weep; for not all tears are an evil.”

OSCAR WILDE

“I can resist everything except temptation.”

“We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

“Always forgive your enemies - nothing annoys them so much.”

“To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.”

“Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”

“To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance.”

“Experience is simply the name we give our mistakes.”

“A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.”

“There is only one thing in the world worse than being talked about, and that is not being talked about.”

“The truth is rarely pure and never simple.”

“You can never be overdressed or overeducated.”

“Never love anyone who treats you like you’re ordinary.”

ANAÏS NIN

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.”

“And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom.”

“Each friend represents a world in us, a world possibly not born until they arrive, and it is only by this meeting that a new world is born.”

“We don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are.”

“Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back, a new life, a new friend, a new love, a new country.”

“Dreams are necessary to life.”

“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect.”

“We travel, some of us forever, to seek other states, other lives, other souls.”

“How wrong it is for a woman to expect the man to build the world she wants, rather than to create it herself.”

“If you do not breathe through writing, if you do not cry out in writing, or sing in writing, then don’t write, because our culture has no use for it.”

“People living deeply have no fear of death.”

“You cannot save people. You can only love them.”

LEWIS CARROLL

“Always speak the truth, think before you speak, and write it down afterwards.”

“I can’t go back to yesterday - because I was a different person then.”

“If you don’t know where you are going, any road will take you there.”

“Who in the world am I? Ah, that’s the great puzzle.”

“One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others.”

“Everything’s got a moral, if only you can find it.”

“Imagination is the only weapon in the war against reality.”

“I knew who I was this morning, but I’ve changed a few times since then.”

“It is better to be feared than loved.”

“Oh, ‘tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round.”

“I give myself very good advice, but I very seldom follow it.”

“We’re all mad here.”

JAMES BALDWIN

“Children have never been very good at listening to their elders, but they have never failed to imitate them.”

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.”

“I imagine one of the reasons people cling to their hates so stubbornly is because they sense, once hate is gone, they will be forced to deal with pain.”

“The paradox of education is precisely this - that as one begins to become conscious one begins to examine the society in which he is being educated.”

“Anyone who has ever struggled with poverty knows how extremely expensive it is to be poor.”

“Love takes off masks that we fear we cannot live without and know we cannot live within.”

“Love does not begin and end the way we seem to think it does. Love is a battle, love is a war; love is a growing up.”

“The most dangerous creation of any society is the man who has nothing to lose.”

“People can cry much easier than they can change.”

“To be sensual, I think, is to be respect and rejoice in the force of life, of life itself, and to be present in all that one does, from the effort of loving to the making of bread.”

“Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.”

“When one begins to live by habit and by quotation, one has begun to stop living.”

ALICE WALKER

“The nature of this flower is to bloom.”

“The most common way people give up their power is by thinking they don’t have any.”

“No person is your friend who demands your silence, or denies your right to grow.”

“Expect nothing. Live frugally on surprise.”

“In nature, nothing is perfect and everything is perfect. Trees can be contorted, bent in weird ways, and they’re still beautiful.”

“Writing saved me from the sin and inconvenience of violence.”

“I have learned not to worry about love; but to honor its coming with all my heart.”

“What the mind doesn’t understand, it worships or fears.”

“Time moves slowly, but passes quickly.”

“Everything want to be loved. Us sing and dance and holler, just trying to be loved.”

“Look closely at the present you are constructing: it should look like the future you are dreaming.”

CHARLES DICKENS

“Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.”

“Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.”

“No one is useless in this world who lightens the burdens of another.”

“Reflect upon your present blessings – of which every man has many – not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”

“We need never be ashamed of our tears.”

“A loving heart is the truest wisdom.”

“The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.”

“A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.”

“Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you’ve conquered human nature.”

There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.”

“Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart.”

F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

“Personality is an unbroken series of successful gestures.”

“Show me a hero and I will write you a tragedy.”

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”

“You don’t write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say.”

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

“All good writing is swimming underwater and holding your breath.”

“There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.”

“Reserving judgements is a matter of infinite hope.”

“Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.”

“I don’t want just words. If that’s all you have for me, you’d better go”

“Writers aren’t people exactly. Or, if they’re any good, they’re a whole lot of people trying so hard to be one person.”

“There is no confusion like the confusion of a simple mind…”

welcome. welcome back to week 5 of the visceral hell known as Yuri!!! On Ice. last week’s

let us begin. 

(sidenote: i may or may not have downloaded the OP to blast in my adult car every morning on my adult drive to my adult job because i am an adult)

coincidentally this is exactly how i feel at the beginning of every yuri!!! on ice episode

so the feeling’s fucking mutual, yuri

i’m sorry i didn’t mean to swear at you son pls forgive me

YURI DON’T LISTEN TO HIM HE’S GOING TO DO SOMETHING HIGHLY INAPPROPRIATE AND IT WILL FUCK WITH MY TENDER DELICATE HEART

what

did i fucking tell you

i’m sorry i don’t mean to swear at u bb i’ll stop i promise

but the thing is

this is not the most obnoxious shit Victor has said or done

in fact this is pretty lowkey for him. it probably wouldn’t even make my list of Top 5 Reasons This Asshat is Literal Satan

and really, isn’t that what we all aspire to be?

you are the actual devil in a frickin 3 piece suit carrying around a tissue box inside a fucking poodle plushie like

are you really in a position to criticize anyone right now

ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU FUCKING BARK LIKE THAT WTH

JUST WHEN YOU THINK HE’S GOING TO TURN AWAY TO WALLOW IN SELF PITY

HE WISHES HIS COMPETITOR GOOD LUCK. i love it when he gets loud ;v;

THIS

THIS IS AN EXACT REPRESENTATION OF HOW I FEEL who knew this ep would be so #relatable 

also who voices minami i have definitely heard that voice before

*”Don’t Cha” by the Pussycat Dolls plays in the distance*

*DON’T CHA INTENSIFIES*

i love it when we get to see victor actually react to things. i love it when he’s not being a very carefully constructed caricature (which is what i feel he’s been most of the show). i love it when he seems affected, and his intentions are less ambiguous, and you realize that, beneath whatever ulterior motive he may or may not have, exists pure and undying love for figure skating and for passion and ultimately for yuri as yuri begin to challenge victor and himself. his entire internal monologue throughout yuri’s routine is literally the most we’ve ever seen into victor’s mind and i hate that i loved it so much

y’know just sayin

and here we see victor redeeming himself in my eyes. will he stick the landing?!

SWEET PRECIOUS BB ANGEL CHILD FROM ABOVE

LITERAL SATAN

when ur lurkin and ya feelings get hurt

stfu satan

well that’s it for this week’s YURIACTION. judging by next week’s preview, it looks like none of us are even close to being free from this hell. catch y’all on the flip 

Yesterday I was on Twitter bonding with other women who learned HTML/etc. through Neopets, MySpace, and similar means and are now professional web developers.

The thing that makes me kind of sad is that as a teenager learning to make cute page layouts and such, no one I knew who was doing that had any aspirations of doing it as a career. Like, all these people–mostly ternage girls–who were making beautiful Livejournal layouts and the like… even now when I see people who obsess over tweaking their Tumblr theme. It makes me wonder if they realized that was even an option. I almost didn’t realize it myself–I had this idea of what “being a programmer” was and it didn’t appeal to me. Yet I was making websites, blog themes, etc. Every “official” blog or website you see, someone had to make that the same way I made any of my stuff (and if you never do it from scratch and think that’s a big leap, it’s really not). It’s a real job that exists and people are paid for.

There’s a lack of women in tech but in fandom and the like there are plenty of girls who love writing code. Why aren’t more people saying to them, “You should be a web developer”?

anonymous asked:

You've been very quietly lately I hope everythings okay?

I have? Sorry about that =/ Everything’s fine, I’m just … I guess you could say reconnecting with the game.

Ok, I’ll be real with you guys; I got a bit incredibly frustrated the other day because I was trying to set up a scene for the Lemons AU and I just couldn’t get it to work. After hours of trying to make it work to no avail and getting to the point where I wanted to just give up on my stories completely and throw my computer out the window, I was like “You know what, fuck this! I just want to play!”

So I took out all my CC and started a new save with no story or goal whatsoever, all I’m doing is just following the sim around and seeing what she gets up to, exploring the game some more and trying to complete her aspirations and stuff.

And I am having SO much freakin’ fun!! I absolutely adore the sim I’m playing and I’m getting to do things I’ve never done in the game before. Not to mention, without CC installed, I’m finding so many things I never even knew were in the game before!

Don’t worry, I’m not giving up on the Lemons or anything, I’m just taking a much needed break to reconnect with the game =D