this is what happens when i experiment with new coloring

Experimenting on my new coloring style again, victim number 2 here is the lovely Terra from the Teen Titans animated series. This time is mostly trying to draw better eyes and perform better lighting.

Also I was looping the song “Last Stardust” by Aimer while drawing Terra, it really saddens me when I looked up the lyric and think of what happened to Terra, the song is good and recommended by me!

safeneighbor  asked:

How did you pick your color palette for your game? I'm working on a similar styled game with the same software, there's a link at my blog to the itch io page for some screenshots. I tried to have my only restriction be to use the NES color palette but it's difficult to use. My concern with using any color available is a lack of coherency. Have you had any issues with that? How do you decide colors? Your games style is so clear. It looks awesome, I cant wait for it. Any advice is helpful. Thanks!

This is a fun question, especially since I didn’t really know about palettes when I got into creating pixel art. In fact, I didn’t really learn much about them until I was already a good deal into development, and I had to be forced by my brother and my wife to choose the new green of the grass.

Basically, keep in mind that I’m still new at this, so take my advice with a grain of salt. :)

To start, check out this thread. The whole thing is great, but this section is probably the best guide for picking a palette for pixel art! Required reading, in my opinion, before you continue.

So let’s take a look at your game (thanks for permission to post your images for critique!):

I think your spritework is pretty good in general–kinda has an Earthbound vibe. I’m a fan of the detail on the item shop, and the NPCs have a distinctive “square head” style that works well. Not shown here, but the menu is also nice, the NPCs are funny, and the camera is smooth. But let’s look at the palette:

  • There’s a lot of saturation. Most of the colors all feel equally “heavy”.
  • The luminescence/brightness level is pretty much the same for everything. Again not much contrast.
  • There are a lot of colors. It’s very busy.
  • There are four different conflicting greens–the grass, the trees, the cat/pumpkin eyes & windows, and the wall (which is kinda yellow/brown).
  • There are two “sets” of orange–the house and the pumpkins–and they also clash.

Compared to this, which looks much better. What are the strengths here?

  • There’s only two types of green–the blue-gray-green and the neon green. It compliments the blues well.
  • Using a lot of black helps ground the palette (plus it’s sweet and retro), while the bits of highly saturated colors balance it out.
  • Limited palette! You use fewer colors, which is great. It helps guide the eyes instead of overwhelming them.

A couple ideas for continuing:

First, use Paletton. Pick a nice base color, then use a tool like Paletton to find complimentary colors. I’d recommend either the triad or tetrad options at the top–three or four main colors is a good rule of thumb for any art. Try to use the “big” color squares presented by Paletton for only one or two of the colors–use the different brightness/saturation levels for the rest. For example, I grabbed your pumpkin orange and came up with this color set. You could use the “big” orange, dark shade of orange, dark shade of blue, light shade of yellow, and light shade of light blue. I wouldn’t use all four of the “big” colors it gives you, otherwise you’ll run into saturation/brightness issues again. And then, if you already have one orange, you only really need maybe a darker and lighter shade–you don’t need a whole new orange.

Another option is to try looking at existing palettes, or even consider using those palettes. DB16 and DB32 are good examples. Also check out this list of “Halloween Palettes”. Get a feel for what colors people chose and why. Notice that colors are almost always very limited.

Remember that grass doesn’t always have to be “grass green”. Here’s an experiment with the first image of yours. It’s not done or perfect, and by no means am I saying you have to use this aesthetic, but it’s just to demonstrate what happens when you consolidate colors and desaturate some of them:

I’ve taken out the original green of the grass and made it a darker, desaturated blue. This helps everything else “pop”. It’s sort of the reverse of what I did with The Waking Cloak, which is now a bright, luminescent yellow/green with hints of brown… and also makes things pop. The name of the game is contrast.

In addition, the walls are now gray, and the edges of the path are the same dark green used in the plants. I also changed it so the pumpkins use the same oranges as the house. I desaturated the brown of the path as well. Are you seeing a pattern? Consolidating and reusing colors, and a mix of high and low luminescence

This isn’t really the results of a lot of premeditated secret knowledge about colors, either (I’m a noob, remember?). I just grabbed some screenshots and played with tweaking/replacing the colors that were already there. There’s still stuff to change with this, like the color of the item shop so it pops a bit more with the new colors, or to add a bigger range of luminescence. The grass feels very dark and heavy. Again, I’m not saying use this palette (unless you like it–in which case go for it! But keep in mind to use the same palette in your battle scene).

If you’d prefer to read up on some more technical aspects, a suggestion I’ve heard is the book Color and Light, by James Gurney, though I haven’t personally read it.

I think that about covers it. Let me know if you have more questions! :D

Boredom

What is boredom? Why is it that small children and babies are rarely if ever bored? It is because they live in a state of full mindfulness.  Mindfulness, living in the now, is our natural state of being when we are young.  It is only later that we start filtering everything through our conscious minds.  When we do this we translate and reduce our direct sensory input to abstractions and symbols.

Thus, that lovely rose becomes not the thing in itself but an abstraction. A kind of amalgamation of “roses I have experienced before” and an abstract concept known as “flowers”.  So we don’t see that particular flower with its own individual beauty, color, shape, scent and imperfections.  When we are in this state we are bored easily unless our experience is either very new, very intense or very unique.

One of the things that happens to people when they experience their awakening is that they get caught staring at a flower or a stone intensely for a long period of time.  Friends may ask “what the heck is wrong with you it’s just a rock”.  But to the newly awakened it is not just “a rock or a flower” it is “THIS rock and THIS flower.”

People talk about being bored while they are at their computers on Tumblr or Facebook.  So, it would appear that boredom is not lack of stimulus or the opportunity for stimulus.

Boredom is a state of mind.  It is a sense of satiation with the world not lack of stimulus.  If you doubt this think about it for a moment.  You love sushi. You love it so much you’ve had it for lunch two days in a row.  Your flatmate says “hey let’s go get sushi” and you say “nah, I’m bored with sushi let’s get a nice curry instead”.  You still love sushi but you’re satiated for now. See?

๑ Samsaran ๑

anonymous asked:

Expose him Daf

“Yeah, ok. Whatever happened to my cooler abilities? I used to be able to teleport between save points and stuff. And do I even get to use the time altering abilities I learned at Undersoul Academy?”

[I think you’re just fine with robotic limbs and fire magic. There’s no need to extend it to the point where you can teleport or alter time.]

[Actually the altering something’s time thing sounds cool, I’ll think about it.]

Daf scoffs. “Alright why do I go through so many redesigns? Isn’t this my fourth wave of new icons? You got the old ones your friend made for you, the black and white ones, those talksprites, and now these colorful images? So I can take my hoodie off? What happened to my awesome brown coat!?”

[Well I like to experiment with icons, just so happens I really like this wave currently. Not to mention I like to update icons with redesigns or when my art improves. You can’t call me out on improving.]

“Ok but what about my swo-”

[Ok that’s enough questions for now.]

anonymous asked:

What does it mean to say "boredom is a self-imposed prison"?

What is boredom? Why is it that small children and babies are rarely if ever bored? It is because they live in a state of full mindfulness.  Mindfulness, living in the now, is our natural state of being when we are young.  It is only later that we start filtering everything through our conscious minds.  When we do this we translate and reduce our direct sensory input to abstractions and symbols.

Thus, that lovely rose becomes not the thing in itself but an abstraction. A kind of amalgamation of “roses I have experienced before” and an abstract concept known as “flowers”.  So we don’t see that particular flower with its own individual beauty, color, shape, scent and imperfections.  When we are in this state we are bored easily unless our experience is either very new, very intense or very unique. 

One of the things that happens to people when they experience their awakening is that they get caught staring at a flower or a stone intensely for a long period of time.  Friends may ask “what the heck is wrong with you it’s just a rock”.  But to the newly awakened it is not just “a rock or a flower” it is “THIS rock and THIS flower.”

People talk about being bored while they are at their computers on Tumblr or Facebook.  So, it would appear that boredom is not lack of stimulus or the opportunity for stimulus. 

Boredom is a state of mind.  It is a sense of satiation with the world not lack of stimulus.  If you doubt this think about it for a moment.  You love sushi. You love it so much you’ve had it for lunch two days in a row.  Your flatmate says “hey let’s go get sushi” and you say “nah, I’m bored with sushi let’s get a nice curry instead”.  You still love sushi but you’re satiated for now. See?

๑ Samsaran ๑

Boredom

by Saṃsāran

Why is it that small children and babies are rarely if ever bored? It is because they live in a state of full mindfulness.  Mindfulness, living in the now, is our natural state of being when we are young.  It is only later that we start filtering everything through our conscious minds.  When we do this we translate and reduce our direct sensory input to abstractions and symbols.

Thus, that lovely rose becomes not the thing in itself but an abstraction. A kind of amalgamation of “roses I have experienced before” and an abstract concept known as “flowers”.  So we don’t see that particular flower with its own individual beauty, color, shape, scent, and imperfections.  When we are in this state we are bored easily unless our experience is either very new, very intense or very unique.

One of the things that happen to people when they experience their awakening is that they get caught staring at a flower or a stone intensely for a long period of time.  Friends may ask “what the heck is wrong with you it’s just a rock”.  But to the newly awakened it is not just “a rock or a flower” it is “THIS rock and THIS flower.”

People talk about being bored while they are at their computers on Tumblr or Facebook.  So, it would appear that boredom is not lack of stimulus or the opportunity for stimulus.

Boredom is a state of mind.  It is a sense of satiation with the world not lack of stimulus.  If you doubt this think about it for a moment.  You love sushi. You love it so much you’ve had it for lunch two days in a row.  Your flatmate says “hey let’s go get sushi” and you say “nah, I’m bored with sushi let’s get a nice curry instead”.  You still love sushi but you’re satiated for now. See?

THE PROFESSIONAL: SUSANNE LANGMUIR 

The Bite Beauty founder gives us exclusive details on the Bite Lip Lab.

Bite CEO Susanne Langmuir has always loved a red lip. “I find reds are the most personal shades. The undertone, the level of pigmentation, and the finish are all so individual.” Finding your perfect shade became easier for New Yorkers thanks to the Bite Lip Lab in SoHo. Now, Bite is bringing the Lip Lab’s most popular color trends to Sephora. Every month, Beauty Insiders will be introduced to an exclusive, limited-edition shade developed in the Lip Lab. The Sephora Glossy talked to Langmuir about what we can expect to see. BECKY PEDERSON

First, what inspired you to start the Bite Lip Lab?
The art of making lipstick is the heart of Bite Beauty and the Lip Lab offers a behind-the-scenes peek at this process. Blending a color from scratch is intuitive, and happens instantly. My favorite experience is when I am mixing and blending new and inspired color creations. I wanted to share this unique and personalized experience with others because I really believe that it brings something fresh and new into the beauty world.

What sorts of color trends have you noticed coming out of the Lip Lab?
This season, we’ve seen a lot of deep wine and berry shades emerge. On the other end, however, we’ve been creating a range of pale pinks and nudes. There always seems to be a dichotomy between bolds and neutrals; the palette just changes each season.

I travel quite a bit, so I often find inspiration in new and different places around the world. Inspiration can come from anywhere—a market, a fabulous meal, or street style. I never know when I see something or someone will influence the next Bite color story.

Are there any colors clients consistently ask for, regardless of the season?
The perfect red! It’s a classic color that never goes out of style, so finding the shade and finish that works for you and your skin tone is something lots of people seek out.

Can you give explain your monthly color collection with Sephora?
Each month Bite will create a Lip Lab-inspired, limited-edition run of a stand out shade that is new, fresh, and fashion-forward, with a scent to match. 

What sorts of 2015 trends or shades do you anticipate introducing to your Sephora collection?
The great thing about our Lip Lab is that we can be reactive. If we see a shade that catches our attention, we can produce it immediately. As such, each shade is just as much of a surprise to me, as it will be to Sephora clients!

SHOP BITE BEAUTY AT SEPHORA>

Boredom, Mindfulness and the Mind of the Child

by  Saṃsāran

Why is it that small children and babies are rarely if ever bored? It is because they live in a state of full mindfulness.  Mindfulness, living in the now, is our natural state of being when we are young.  It is only later that we start filtering everything through our conscious minds.  When we do this we translate and reduce our direct sensory input to abstractions and symbols.

Thus, that lovely rose becomes not the thing in itself but an abstraction. A kind of amalgamation of “roses I have experienced before” and an abstract concept known as “flowers”.  So we don’t see that particular flower with its own individual beauty, color, shape, scent and imperfections.  When we are in this state we are bored easily unless our experience is either very new, very intense or very unique.

One of the things that happens to people when they experience their awakening is that they get caught staring at a flower or a stone intensely for a long period of time.  Friends may ask “what the heck is wrong with you it’s just a rock”.  But to the newly awakened it is not just “a rock or a flower” it is “THIS rock and THIS flower.”

Some hallucinogenic drugs mimic this experience by chemically short circuiting the connections made by the conscious mind.  In this drugged state perceptions appear very fresh and new simply because they are cross-wired. A smell translates into a sound, a sight merges with scent and associations come in a wildly disconnected manner which though bizarre make sense in the way the disconnected images in dreams make sense.  So, this is why when you take mushrooms you can stare at ant hill for three hours in rapt fascination.  Now, I do not advocate drug use as a path to enlightenment.  There are no shortcuts.  However, I do confess that there are certain commonalities to the two states of consciousness.

I do not know if I have explained this very well.  Some things are better experienced directly than taught.

FRONT/CENTER: MAKE UP FOR EVER ARTIST SHADOW

Founder Dany Sanz shares her inspiration with The Sephora Glossy.

When MAKE UP FOR EVER founder Dany Sanz told us she prefers “simple makeup,” we couldn’t help but laugh. With 210 shades, her new, customizable Artist Shadow palettes are anything but. Made with a blend of oils, just one shade of the ultra-fine powder can be stretched into a variety of hues and looks. We spoke with Sanz about what it’s like to create a product loved by professional and amateur makeup artists alike. BECKY PEDERSON, REPORTING BY KELLEY HOFFMAN

What made you decide to release such an enormous collection?
“It’s important because a shadow for me has always been very symbolic. When I opened the shop in ’84, nothing really special was happening with shadow. Shadow was always, you see, a powder and a pigment. So I [made a new kind of] shadow and it was really important—no one was doing that.”

How are your shadows innovative?
“It’s always about trying to find something new, something better. So, to do better means to know what the customers want: more stability, more intensity, new colors, and new effects. So, we tried to find ways to do this. And [while experimenting], I discovered it was also possible to do a new formula with oil and water, like a jelly. Maybe just five years ago it was impossible to imagine.”

I’ve never heard anyone describe eye shadow like “jelly.” What does it feel like?
“Because of the formula, the texture is not so dry [like other shadows]. You can see when you put some on your finger—you feel like a cream. It’s not a cream, it’s a powder, but you feel the humidity, you know?”

Of all the 210 colors you created, which one is your favorite?
“Black.”

Black? [laughs] It’s always black with you!
“[laughs] I know.”

What makes black special?
“For me, black is not one color. I have 210 colors, but it’s not all about the color; it’s also special effects. You know, so many of them are matte, semi-matte, shiny, metallic…. You see, it’s not only color; it’s also what’s inside the color.”

You worked with 30 makeup artists to pick their 30 favorite colors for MAKE UP FOR EVER’s 30th anniversary palette. What was that experience like?
“It makes me so full of emotion. When we do something really great together and I see people—makeup artists—really happy and the community around the brand…it’s a great moment.”

SHOP MAKE UP FOR EVER ARTIST SHADOWS AT SEPHORA>