this is the story of sir boast a lot

“Do not watch this!” Breaking the fourth wall in a video message... the wheel turns, nothing is ever new...

Sleep No More, a Doctor Who episode written by Mark Gatiss.

Here we have a Professor Moriarty “who has been playing a long game.” 

(more Sleep No More/Sherlock parallels (before s4 aired) in this episode here). 

The Professor interrupts “THE END” of the story in a video message, looking directly at the camera. 

Originally posted by allthesherlockgifs

Originally posted by livingthegifs

They are all villains in control of the story:

“I do hope you’ve enjoyed the show. I did try to make it exciting: all those scary bits, all those death-defying scrapes, monsters, and a proper climax with a really big one at the end. Compulsive viewing. I did tell you not to watch.

^Directly showing the idea of a story being created, (the Professor’s ALIBI). aware of it being fictional (this is the story of Sir Boast-A-Lot)… a creepy glitchy noise very like the ‘Did you miss me’ videos… a video message with a poisonous message hidden inside ( “who you really are, it doesn’t matter”“he planted that doubt inside her head, that little nagging sensation you’re going to have to be strong to resist”). 

Compulsive viewing. Like a game show. With a time limit.

Originally posted by moriartea-drinker

Originally posted by damnmuse

And “I did tell you not to watch” rather reminds me of one of Mark’s friends… ;)

Hullo. Are you ready for the story?

This is the story of Sir Boast-a-lot. Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight at the Round Table.

But soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain. 

And soon they began to wonder, Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true? Oh no…

So one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories. He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” 

And then, even the king began to wonder. 

But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problem.

No.

That wasn’t the Final Problem. 

The end.

Why “The Final Problem” being John’s version of “The Abominable Bride” makes absolute sense

Lots of others have mentioned this already. However, because a lot of us are upset over The Final Problem, no one wants to rewatch and write meta.  But here are a few things for you all to consider.

1) John got shot at the end of The Lying Detective. He got shot with an actual bullet.  We’ve been studying Sherlock’s subtext forever and we all knew John was going to get shot, we knew the Three Garridebs canon moment was coming, yet we ignored it when we saw it because we believed the narrative spoon-fed to us.  John did not get hit with a tranquilizer – he actually got shot.  He’s in his mind palace.  Or, rather, his mind bungalow, as he’s referred to it before. 

2) The Six Thatchers told us John knows a LOT about horror films. Probably why 20 of them were mentioned in The Final Problem.  John also loves Bond movies, which is why this nightmare scenario is part Saw- part Bond.

3) If Moriarty was Sherlock’s inner demon in TAB, then Eurus is John’s inner demon in TFP. This is why young Eurus is wearing John’s sweater. This is why she’s shown as a mirror for him on multiple occasions. She’s bisexual, she’s kept behind glass (repression) because her family put her there at first but now because she chooses to be there as an adult. She hears Sherlock playing Irene’s theme on the violin and asks if he’s had sex – this is John’s inner demon right here, asking what John’s already asked on the surface.  John’s demon can be saved only if Sherlock comes to the bedroom and helps land the plane. “Landing” is follow-through when it comes to “falling in love”.  TFP is a direct mirror to TAB – Sherlock knew then that John would always be there when he’s falling, and now John knows Sherlock would be there when he’s landing. It’s a complete mirror, exactly the one we were certain of months ago. Why did we dismiss this when we saw it? Because we lost faith in the story.  Like Sir Boast-a-lot. Like The Princess Bride. We’re right on schedule.

4) Everything happening in TFP is a nightmare for John.  Sherlock neglecting Vatican Cameos, Sherlock leaving him to drown, Sherlock saying “I love you” to Molly, Sherlock actually loving Irene Adler, A John-sized coffin with “I Love You” written on it closed and smashed by Sherlock, Mary infiltrating their lives again to tell them how their relationship should be. John is so fucking repressed he doesn’t think Sherlock feels the same way about him that he does about Sherlock.  He’s mirrored in Molly in real life – how awful for John to think “I love Sherlock, I’ve always loved Sherlock, but he thinks we’re friends, why is he making a fool of me?” – like, The Final Problem might be my new favorite episode because this is masterful. 

5) Eurus does exist, but not as a crazy woman on Shutter Island.  There was a reason she flirted with John, there’s a reason she’s been hovering around them for ages now.  I wrote a meta about it here.  It still fits 100%.  The only thing I didn’t take into account was BBC Sherlock faking its own death by dropping a ludicrous red herring as a series finale. 

You guys thought we couldn’t see anything gayer, anything more repressed than Sherlock’s mind in The Abominable Bride?  Oh.  Oh, no. Take another watch of The Final Problem and you’ll see what actually happens to a repressed bisexual with a high sex-drive and a crippling love obsession when their mind is allowed to play tricks on him. 

2

This is the story of Sir Boast-A-Lot. Sir Boast-A-Lot was the bravest and cleverest knight of the Round Table, but soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was, and how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder… “Are Sir Boast-A-Lot’s stories even true?” Oh no. So one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t belieeeve Sir Boast-A-Lot’s stories. He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then, even the King began to wonder…  But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-A-Lot’s problem. No, that wasn’t the final problem.

The end.

loadingscreendxdirectorscut  asked:

I was just playing Super Sonic's story in SA, and I decided to talk to everyone I could beforehand. The Mystic Ruins expedition team is sent home because they never found the ruins, and my two favorite lines are in Station Square. The guy in front of the Speed Highway elevators proudly boasts "My building will last forever!" and the hotel clerk says business is slow, but that "The building will fill up in no time." Sir, you have no idea how right you are.

The NPCs in SA1 are really easy to overlook. It’s a shame that this is the case seeing as how many of them have interesting stories and a lot of dialogue can only be seen if you do really obscure things.

For example - taking the Speed Highway ID card into the Hotel and talking to the guy at the counter while holding it.

Or this guy who only appears until Sky Chase 1 whose dialogue changes depending on whether you’ve beaten the Icecap yet:

(After Icecap he says something along the lines of “Oh, you’ve been already?”)

He’s one of many NPCs who have new dialogue at points where you have to go out of your way to head back to Station Square and find them, it’s pretty neat!

I like what Unleashed did with the NPCs to fix the problem of missing out on them, with giving a lot of them interactions that can be done at any time in the game and progress at your own speed.

The Final Problem

JIM: What’s the final problem? I did tell you … but did you listen?

Here it is:

MYCROFT: The damsel in distress. In the end, are you really so obvious? Because this was textbook: the promise of love, the pain of loss, the joy of redemption; then give him a puzzle … and watch him dance.

Irene is Jim’s trial run to burn Sherlock’s heart out. The real version uses John.

Keep reading

8

H u l l o . Are you ready for the story? This is the story of Sir Boast-a-lot. Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight at the Round Table, but soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder…“Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true?” So one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories. He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then even the King began to wonder. But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problem. No. That wasn’t the final problem. T h e  E n d .

“This is the story of Sir Boast-a-lot.
Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight at the Round Table. But soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder, Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true? Oh no…
So one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories. He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then, even the king began to wonder. But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problem. No. That wasn’t the Final Problem. The end.“

Sister! There’s always something … about Janine.

Is Moriarty really back from the dead? Or is it Sherlock’s version of Professor Moriarty’s brother (also named James in Arthur Conan Doyle’s canon), Janine? 

It would be “Sherl” and “Mike” in reverse :

Janine -> Jaime  (or Janey) -> Jane Moriarty (gender-swapped from ACD’s James Moriarty).  

This will allow a parallel to the beginning of A Study in Pink with Harriet “Harry” Watson – and we learned from S03 that parallel callbacks are worth bonus points in Sherlock’s storylines:

Both Jim and Janine have first appeared as people that draw little attention under the circumstances.

Jim as the IT guy: ‘So you’re Sherlock Holmes.’ <- Who pays attention to the non-medical support staff at St. Bart’s?

Janine as the chief bridesmaid: ‘So you’re Mr. Holmes.’ <- Who pays attention to a bridesmaid when all eyes are on the happy couple during a wedding?

Janine worked as personal assistant to Magnussen, which is functionally similar to ACD’s James Moriarty the younger’s profession as “station master” - someone who keeps a train station (updated now to a media empire) on time and in running order (updated now to by directing people and information instead of people and trains). In any case, also a support staff role that draws little attention.

Storytelling seems to be a favorite family hobby, along with kiss-and-telling-a-lot:

Keep reading

2

Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight of the round table but soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder “Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true?” Ohhhh noooo. So all of the knights went to King Arthur and said “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories! He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then even the King began to wonder, but that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problems. No. That wasn’t the final problem. The End.

I’m making a bigger meta with some important things I find in my rewatch of Sherlock (all episodes), but I couldn’t resist sharing this insane piece of art.

In TRF, Moriarty shows up on a TV screen with fake thunderstorms as the background, as well as the ‘rainbow static shake effect’ from the trailers of series four. The mirror to the series 4 trailers of that caught my attention, but the words were what convinced me.

“This is the story of Sir Boast-A-Lot.” (Intro to the story, but I haven’t found a solid connection yet)
“He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” (Reminded me of Lestrade in TFP saying “he’s a good one.”)

Now here’s the kicker:
“But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-A-Lot’s problem. No. That wasn’t the final problem. The end.”

THEY TOLD US. BUT DID WE LISTEN?

The Storyteller

First it was Jim. Richard Brooks presents us with Sherlock as Sir Boast-a-Lot, he’s just a big ol’ liar who makes things up to make himself look good.

Then it was John. Watson, the writer, who presents a version of Sherlock to the public as a cold, calculating machine, but doesn’t believe it’s true.

Now it’s Sherlock turn. Something’s happened, Mary has died, and Sherlock is covering the facts of her death with a fairy tale. A romance, filled with temptation and a damsel in distress and trekking to foreign lands, the promise of love, the pain of loss, the joy of redemption––a story about the Watsons, with a Grimm ending indeed, completely the fault of boastful Sherlock.

But it’s not real. None of it’s real, this is the lying detective, the storyteller. And this isn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-Lot’s problem. No.

This isn’t the final problem. 

2

Hello. Are you ready for the story? This is the story of Sir Boast-a-lot. Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight at the round table, but soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain, and some of them began to wonder, “Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true?” Oh no. So, one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories. He’s just a big, old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then, even the king began to wonder, but that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problems. No. That wasn’t the final problem. The end.

4

Hello. Are you ready for the story? This is the story of Sir Boast-a-lot. Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight of the round table but soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder: “Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true?” Oh no… So, one of the knights went to King Arthur and said: “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories, he’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then even the King began to wonder… But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problems. No. That wasn’t the final problem. The End.

Sir Boast-a-lot was the bravest and cleverest knight at the Round Table. But soon the other knights began to grow tired of his stories about how brave he was and how many dragons he’d slain. And soon they began to wonder, Are Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories even true? Oh no… So one of the knights went to King Arthur and said, “I don’t believe Sir Boast-a-lot’s stories. He’s just a big old liar who makes things up to make himself look good.” And then, even the king began to wonder. But that wasn’t the end of Sir Boast-a-lot’s problem. No. That wasn’t the Final Problem. The end.