this is the same snake

i saw a post about the new s76 skin having the same arms as balloon snake and i literally cant stop thinking about it. its haunting me 

boi i just had so much drama with the whole saves not appearing situation-but all is well now. i made these specifically for Logan because i felt i had a lack of piercings for her, so ta dah!

*DISCLAIMER* i made these for a certain sim so the position of the piercings are in her shape. if  you can’t see them then you’ll need to rejig yo sims face if it’s really that necessary. but if it so happens that your sim already has the same chin position- then yay. so yeah.


sims 4 snake bite piercings

new mesh. suitable for all genders ❤

(ノ゚ο゚)ノミ  download

How To: Develop Your Characters

I think we’ve all been in the situation where we want to write about a specific character but have no idea how to approach it. For some reason, despite them being your own character, you have no idea how they would act or what they would say in a certain situation. Sometimes, if you even write about your character(s) at all, when you read it back they seem fake or 2-Dimensional. Unrealistic, if you’d prefer.

In this post, I am going to give you some exercises to get past hollow characters and help develop your writing. 

1) Empty Their Pockets

Pretty simple. Think of what your characters would have in their pockets on a day-to-day basis. It doesn’t have to be anything super extraordinary, of course. Just start writing some everyday items down and think about whether your character would have these items in their pockets. 

Let’s take a look at one I did for my characters earlier. (sorry that just sounded like something from Blue Peter)

For example:

Character A’s Pockets Contained:

pack of gum, empty pack of cigarettes, library card, NOKIA brick phone

So, here a few things you can tell about Character A simply through the items in their pockets. They visit the library often, meaning that they probably have a high interest in reading (this also could be a sign of intelligence). Judging by the fact Character A has both a pack of gum and cigarettes this could indicate a potential smoking habit, chewing gum is a known way for helping people quit smoking. The pack of cigarettes could show that they are not very good at restricting themselves and could in fact be addicted and finding it hard to cope with smoking. Finally, the NOKIA brick phone shows how they may want to feel connected to people or want to allow their friends/family members/whoever to be able to contact them but have no desire to get the latest model of phone or perhaps believe that having such a device would distract them unnecessarily. 

When doing this exercise, think about key objects which portray certain details about your character! Try not to overthink it too much, write whatever comes to mind and put it down on the page! After writing down a couple objects, go back through them and feel free to edit out items you think are unnecessary or add items which you think would suit the character. 

2) Go Through Their Daily Routine

Again, another easily explained exercise. Go through a regular day in your character’s life, try and do this exercise as if it was happening before whatever events occur in your story or novel. This way it makes it easier to understand your character before they met a secondary character in the novel or before whatever events happened in your writing which may affect their routine. You don’t need to include every single detail in your description, just brief notes or key events which occur during their day would be fine. You can make it as short or as long as you wish, maybe don’t just do it for one day in your character’s week perhaps do it for multiple days. 

Does their routine change during the week? What time do they wake up? What time do they go to sleep? Are they punctual with going to work? Do they do any other activities outside their day-job? These are the kind of things you may want to ask yourself when writing it. 

3) Give Them Fears/Phobias

Everyone fears something: whether it be a phobia of spiders or oblivion, everyone has a fear. Giving your character a phobia makes them seem more realistic, it allows your reader to easily relate to your character.

However, just having a phobia for the sake of it doesn’t help develop your character at all. If you give them a terrible phobia of snakes and they come across a snake and suddenly within moments are able to get over their fear just like that, it’s not a phobia. It’s more of a mild inconvenience than anything else. The reader needs to feel convinced by their fears, they would feel more dissatisfied with your writing if they felt the character could dismiss anything and everything than knowing them being confronted by their fears could be a possible problem. Besides, it would give them no reason to motivate or encourage the character if they knew it was impossible for them to be defeated by anything. Still, this does not mean that your character has to be destroyed by their fear. There is a very big difference between simply dismissing your character’s fear and perhaps overcoming it in the future.

An easy way to write your character possibly overcoming their fear in the future is that when they first encounter that fear, add an element of chance or fate into it. For example, if a character were to move to get away from the creature which may be coming towards them; in the process of getting up, they could slip which could cause their legs to lash out towards the creature. The sudden movement may just be enough to scare the creature away, this way it does not appear to the reader as ridiculous or uncharacteristic courage but instead accidental bravery. This sudden revelation that the character’s horrible fear may not be as all powerful as they first thought could be the first step for them to slowly overcome that fear.

Don’t believe me? Let’s think about this for a moment. Imagine your character, let’s call them the Protagonist™, is stuck in a terrible situation. It doesn’t matter what the situation is but let’s say it’s something which involves them being trapped in a room with a snake. I’m going to give you two examples, both involving the same situation.

Example #1:

Protagonist watched with wide eyes as the snake slowly slithered towards them. The snake paused for a moment, it hissed lowly as it waited for Protagonist to move, waiting for the right moment to strike.  Not hesitating for a single moment, they suddenly realised how dire the situation was and jumped to their feet. Their heart pumping wildly as their body was filled with adrenaline, they were terrified yet they had to do something. Protagonist grabbed the nearest thing to them and stepped towards the snake.

“Get away!” They threatened, “Get away!”

Example #2:

Protagonist watched with wide eyes as the snake slowly slithered towards them. The snake paused for a moment, it hissed lowly as it waited for Protagonist to move, waiting for the right moment to strike. The blood in Protagonist’s veins ran cold as the snake grew closer and closer, Protagonist couldn’t move. They begged and screamed on the inside to move away, to get away as far as possible. They had lost all control of their movement, their fear had consumed them. They were frozen to the spot and could only watch as the snake widened it’s jaw, ready to bite down on it’s prey. It widened it’s jaw once, twice - suddenly, Protagonist gained back their instincts. Fleeing seemed like the only realistic option and seconds before the snake could chomp down on their ankle, Protagonist stumbled to their feet. They stumbled backwards into a puddle of water which had pooled behind them and their ankle rolled as they slipped, their legs accidentally lashing out towards the predator. The snake recoiled backwards in shock before deciding that the risk wasn’t worth it: it quickly retreated back to it’s nest, disappearing from Protagonist’s view.

Now, hopefully you see what I mean. I think we can all agree that the second example is a lot better than the first one. 

4) Create Their Flaws/Bad Habits

No one is perfect, this includes your characters. 

If you’re finding it challenging to think of any flaws, try to think of some bad habits. It doesn’t have to be anything so terribly bad that’s it’s illegal. Think simple when it comes to this exercise. It can range from anything between chewing their nails to swearing. 

It might help to try and develop these bad habits into possible flaws or weaknesses. If your character keeps biting their nails that might be a sign of nervousness or anxiety. So, creating bad habits might be a good way to show a certain trait your character may possess. 

Flaws are important as well. Let’s be realistic, if no character had any flaws then every single book we read would be filled with a bunch of characters which are exactly the same. Besides, what’s a hero without it’s villain? 

So, to give you a few ideas, let’s go back to superheroes. Maybe a hero is so set on doing the right thing that they lose sight of what they want? Perhaps it gets to a certain point where they can’t handle that hollow feeling inside of them that they grow arrogant, selfish or even stubborn? There’s a story for you right there. 

Not only that, by giving your characters flaws it is possible that you could work that into your story somehow. This way, not only will you get to show off your amazing character development, but it could also be an exciting point in your storyline.

Write down some ideas, think of flawed personality traits and just write them down! Try to write down at least five straight off the bat, for each one you don’t like you should think about why it doesn’t suit your character. You’re bound to find one flaw you’re happy with!

5) Write Some Scenarios

Now that you’ve developed your characters, go ahead and write them in your story! If you think you still need a bit of practice, try writing something about them being in a certain scenario. It could be anything from ordering their favourite coffee to being trapped in a prison: just write it! Try not to think about it too much, just do whatever feels write (I unintentionally made that pun but i’m not deleting it). 

It doesn’t have to be long either, just a couple paragraphs would be fine. Try to focus on body movements and interior thoughts, it would be ideal if your character was on their own in the situation: that way you can get to know the character on their own a lot better. No other characters means no distractions. It’s just you, the wonderful author, and your character - there is an endless amount of possibilities for you! 


Have faith in yourself too! Nobody knows your brilliantly developed characters better than you do, so here’s your chance to show them off! If you’d like a second opinion, write something about them and give it to a friend/parent/random stranger etc. to read! If they don’t want to, make them read it anyway! 

I hope this helps you all in developing your characters! 

Happy writing!

- jess

A rare snake-related post by me-

I have had Vision, a dwarf BCI and my youngest snake, for roughly 9 months now. He will be a year old in July, so by snake standards he is still very much a baby. In the past 9 months, he’s gone from, for lack of better words, a bitey defensive asshole to a relatively passive and trusting creature who simply has Rules ™ on how, where, and when he can be touched. I used the same method to produce these results as I do with all of my reptiles, including my young snake of a notoriously aggressive and defensive species (Amazon Tree Boas) and have frequently been asked how I manage to get these animals that instinctively bite first and ask questions never to allow handling and pictures without drawing blood.

On my dog blog I’ve mentioned the concept of body autonomy a few times in relation to training dogs, and how it crosses over into husbandry in other species. In these posts I’ve detailed how I tame the larger birds at my job, how I teach my snakes not to bite me when I take them out, how I can successfully convince a thrashing dog to accept grooming without a fuss, how I teach cats to not turn into screaming demons for nail trims, and more. I also cover this in many of my dog training lectures at work as my students teach their dogs to allow grooming, nail trims, and medically related handling to prevent injuries and incidents when interacting with these animals. All of this relates back to body autonomy, and how we as humans have consistently ignored other species’ instinctive need to be autonomous.

I am no master animal trainer and do not play one on TV. I train pet dogs and service dogs and have begun to venture into competition, at one point I specialized in rehabbing aggressive and reactive dogs. I have trained various common pet animals in occasionally unconventional ways to do things that make life easier for the both of us, but I don’t claim to be anything special, because what I’m doing is not all that special. It is, however, uncommon for people to make these considerations with their pets and then they call in someone like me to fix a problem that didn’t need to start in the first place.

An example being: frequently on this website and others, the solution for convincing a biting snake not to bite you is to hold it still until it stops biting you. The snake will learn that biting you does not produce the desired result (you letting the snake go or putting it back in its cage) and thus will eventually stop biting you when you pick it up.

In the dog training world, we call this flooding and learned helplessness. It “works” because it produces what we wanted it to. The snake no longer bites when you pick it up. But it failed to address the root of the problem, and frequently if regular handling is not maintained the snake will return to biting you every time you touch it. The snake had learned that there was nothing it could do in order to make you stop doing what it didn’t like, and so had learned that it was helpless against the much larger human. The snake in this situation still doesn’t really want to be handled, it is merely tolerating it because it sees no other option.

While snakes have a much more primitive brain than dogs and thus a much more limited scope of emotions, aggression and violence are always expensive measures to use and thus are frequently considered last resort measures to make an unpleasant situation stop. They are costly in body resources- they take large amounts of energy, stress, and time to resolve, and wounds obtained from violence can become deadly with infection or severity. As a result, a bite should always indicate that whatever you are doing is so unpleasant to the animal you’re doing it to that they’re willing to risk their life in order to make you stop. The common pet snake knows it cannot win against an animal as large as a human. It is hoping you have not come to the same realization, and will not call its bluff.

This creates a problem. Like with dogs, backing off from a situation that is required after a bite will teach the snake that all they have to do to get you to leave them alone is to bite you. If I need to trim my dog’s nails, give him a bath, brush him, or have him examined by a vet, sure I could put him in a muzzle and force him to do it anyway, but it is counter-intuitive to teach him that all he has to do is bite me in order to get out of doing those things he may consider unpleasant. I need to be able to handle my snakes. This is not negotiable, just like the above things I do with my dogs are not negotiable. If I cannot handle them, I cannot check them for injury, disease, or distress. Backing off because my snake, or dog, has threatened to bite me is thus not a viable option. I must be able to complete the task, and the animal in question must let me.

Dogs, by comparison, are relatively easy to convince in this problem. I need to be able to do my dog’s nails. If I give him amazing treats on a good reward schedule, shower him with praise, listen to his body language to give him a chance to calm down and destress before pressing on, and remove my own negative emotions from the equation, he will learn to let me do his nails and even offer the position required for the task within a relatively short amount of time. He does not have to like having his nails done, but I can convince him to like he benefits he gets out of it. Cats and birds and small mammal pets like ferrets, rabbits, and rodents may be slower, but follow much the same way.

I can’t give a snake a treat. That’s not really how snake digestive systems work. I can’t give them a toy. I can’t give them praise. The subtleties of snake body language are much harder to read due to a lack of eyelids, ears, and limbs. Dogs, cats, birds, ferrets, all of these are social creatures that practice social bonding and feel an emotion similar to love (in the dog’s case, actually do feel love). Snakes are not social creatures and their brain is not capable of producing the chemicals involved in the emotion we call love. I cannot convince a snake to love me or to like being handled. That is not something their biology is able to do. Does that mean I have to rely on flooding and learned helplessness in order to get them to let me handle them?

I keep stressy species. While all reptiles are more than capable of stressing themselves to death, my current list of exotic pets includes a special needs ball python with a severe neurological condition, a brazilian rainbow boa specifically purchased from someone who breeds minimally stressy snakes because he got tired of the species’ reputation for being bitey assholes, and a dwarf bci locality (read: like a subspecies, but not different enough to get their own scientific name) known for being defensive bitey assholes. Previously, I had a special needs corn snake that was a defensive bitey asshole, an amazon tree boa that was remarkably handleable despite the species’ reputation for being aggressive and defensive bitey angry assholes, and a few foster ball pythons that came from neglect situations and had never been handled before leading to them being defensive bitey assholes. Stress is common in situations where aggression or violence is utilized, even if it is being utilized by the animal and not the human. If the stress from moving can kill my beloved ATB Hydra, why would I intentionally expose him to situations where he would feel required to use violence again and again until he learned that that was not a way out of the situation?

I did not flood my snakes. I hold them. They do not bite me. It has been a long time since any of them have even struck at me, and the majority of the bites and strikes I have received have been from when I was learning the snake in front of me or from me intentionally ignoring their body language and handling them a way I knew they didn’t like for whatever reason. Snakes do not bite without cause. Whether you, a human, can see that cause or not, snakes do not bite because they are vindictive or mean. As said, their brains are far too primitive to feel such complex emotions. Even wild snakes do not bite without provocation- whether you intentionally provoked them or not does not matter, simply whether they felt provoked enough to need to defend themselves possibly with their lives.

Vision came to me unsure of my intentions and of whether I could be considered safe. He certainly didn’t believe I should be picking him up. At two months old, the world is a scary place to a baby snake where nearly everything is bigger than you and nearly everything wants to kill or eat you. I do not blame him for doubting the warm giant cooing over him with grabby hands. To him, I’m sure I am some baffling mixture of hawk, bear, and wild canine. All of these things readily kill and eat snakes, all of these things may be persuaded to not kill and eat this particular snake if he bites them.

Instead of picking him up and allowing him to spend precious resources stressing himself to the point of repeatedly biting me- which hurts, by the way, so I don’t really want to be bitten any more than I need to be- I allowed him to show me things about him. I let him show me what he does when he’s nervous, when he doesn’t want to be bothered. I let him show me what he does when he’s curious and feels like investigating what’s in front of him. I let him show me how he does and does not like to be touched. Like many snakes, he seems to enjoy being scratched lightly under the chin. Like many snakes, he doesn’t seem to appreciate being tickled on the stomach. He prefers to create a “foot” about 2/3 down his body and use it as an anchored perch when exploring my hands. He does not want his tail to be touched. When he is nervous or unsure of potential danger, he will retract and coil himself into a loose ball. If pressed before he recovers, he will “expand” the “ball” quickly and vocalize. If he continues to be pressured, he will threaten to bite and will begin to try. If he is allowed to relax, he will recreate his “foot” and resume quietly investigating his surroundings.

Today, I took the lid off of his enclosure and lifted him out without a fuss. While this is not a first- we accomplished this task about 4 weeks in- only in the past few weeks has he not immediately retracted into his loose ball and required me to wait a few minutes for him to relax before touching him. Instead, he immediately made his “foot” and began to investigate, leaned against my finger as I scratched his chin, and maintained his confidence throughout the time I handled him. Sure, I could possibly get a similar result through the first method of flooding and teaching him that he is helpless against me, but I don’t need to. I can get a confident content snake that is not only tolerating my handling but also showing curiosity and intelligence without forcing him to accept my hands as things he has to deal with in his life.

The people espousing these methods always ask me how I managed to take such nice, interesting pictures of Hydra without bleeding- or joke about how much blood they think I lost inbetween shots- and are always surprised when I tell them that I don’t get bit because I understand a snake’s need for autonomy and allow the snake to tell me their “rules” for being touched and then follow those rules or understand if I break them I will get bit. As a result, I don’t break their rules unless I have to, and thus I don’t get bit unless I have to. This allows me to handle and investigate my snakes, look in their mouths, check their vents and between their scales, touch their heads, and rescue them from fluke accidents such as Quetzal’s injury with his decor without the snake taking their frustrations out on me. It also allows me to take some pretty pictures of them outside or on props without worrying how I will retrieve them without being bitten when I’m done. 

WHY ARE THEY MAKING MORE MOVIES TO MAKE PEOPLE SCARED OF SHARKS??? WHY!!

More people a year die from DROWNING than shark bites.

So go on and make a movie about that.

Also, shark diving cages have buoys on them so they DON’T sink.

AND ALSO, those girls would have died on the way down 156 ft (47 meters) to the “bottom” cause they weren’t descending properly, controlling their buoyancy or equalize their ears. Human bodies cannot take that pressure so quickly.

UGGGH STOP MAKING SHARK MOVIES Unless its nice shark movies showing how cute they are. They’re not evil things looking to eat humans. There are 375 (to date) know species of sharks and only about a dozen are considered particularly dangerous. The 3 breeds responsible for most reports are tiger, bull and great whites. Bull sharks and tiger sharks are aggressive breeds. Great whites aren’t but they’re just so massive, a bite from them is not the same it would be from a smaller shark. With that, shark bites are usually never fatal. Most shark bites are just them checking out the scene cause they don’t have hands and when they realize you’re not food, they leave! Never blame the shark for biting you, you are in the water, their home. It’s the risk you’re willingly taking getting in. If you’re scared of getting bitten by a shark, don’t get in the water! Just like if you were scared of any other animal! You don’t get in a place that says there are snakes when you’re scared of snakes! Snakes live there, you don’t. So don’t go in if you don’t want to risk seeing or being bitten by a snake. Same with sharks and the ocean.

Sure, they’re maybe a hundred or so shark bite incidences a year but humans, with commercial fishing alone, kill hundreds of millions of sharks a year and that’s just commercial fishing!!! 

Sharks vital to ecosystem! Stop making people fear them and want them dead! We need them.

the switch

→scenario: You think you’re getting a normal Christmas present from your boyfriend Hoseok, but what he doesn’t tell you is that your gift includes a special power he and the rest of the boys have, enabling them to switch off between one another… during sex.

→pairing: bts | reader

→genre: smut

→word count: 9,085

Keep reading

2

This is a two-headed albino milksnake [x]. Each head has a brain and able to control over the shared body, causing difficulty in movement. Luckily, they shared the same stomach, snakes with separate stomachs will often fight and bite each other over the prey if one head has prey in its mouth.

In the wild, two-headed snake lifespan may be restricted significantly for they cannot escape predators well but despite this, two-headed snakes can lived up to 20 years in captivity.

Doctor Who Panel - Ottawa Comic Con 2017

I haven’t made a post here for a long time but this is the most fandom thing I’ve done in a while and wanted to share. I attended the DW Panel and we had Peter Capaldi, Alex Kingston and Jenna Coleman in Ottawa which was great because we never get anyone and certainly not a current Doctor. They were all wonderful and I really enjoyed the event. Here are some of the highlights (I say highlights but this is basically the whole thing) 

Q: Peter Capaldi (PC) what do you look for in a partner?
PC: longevity 

Q: Fave monsters?
PC: Likes the Daleks but his long time fave are the Zarbi from the episode “The Web Planet”
Alex Kingston (AK): When she was young, she liked the Cybermen but now its the Silence (she never actually said the name, she acted like she couldn’t remember it and Jenna ended up being the one to say it)
Jenna Coleman (JC): She also likes the Silence. She finds the scariest monsters are the ones which never have to run but move slowly

Q: Fave Dalek scene?
JC: When she was a Dalek (“Asylum of the Daleks”)
CP: When they were shrunk and put into a Dalek (someone from the crowd shouted rusty, “Into the Dalek”)
AK: When she killed a Dalek (”The Big Bang”)

Q: Fave emotional scene without giving away any spoilers?
JC: The diner scene. It was shot over two days as they shot some of it in the diner and the rest in the studio. She didn’t think the parts shot in the studio were meant to be emotional, when she enters her Tardis. But Peter was there when he didn’t have to, in his own clothes, and seeing him there made her emotional
AK: Saying good bye to David, getting the ‘piss off’ (her words) from Matt, and for Peter it was hard for both of them to hold back their emotions but still be able to show it to the audience, of knowing what was in store for each other without the other knowing.   

Q: Jenna asked what it felt like dying
JC: She read in the script a raven was meant to fly at her, but she didn’t know what to expect on set and whether they would actually get a raven which would be made to fly at her. So when that didn’t actually happen she was so relieved she kept forgetting to actually die. 

Q: Choose a show or movie for Doctor Who to do a crossover
PC: Game of thrones, because the Doctor can definitely take down the white walkers
AK: Lord of the Rings, and the Doctor to face the Orcs
JC: The Thick of it (so Pc vs PC lol)

Q: If they could choose a name for the Doctor what would it be
JC: Bob 
PC: Doesn’t believe the Doctor’s name can be understood by humans, so it isn’t a word
AK: When she was shooting the scene where River Song whispers the Doctor’s name, the first take she whispered the name Shaniqua (lol) and caused an NG. She kept changing the name every time they shot the scene but wouldn’t say the other names 

Q: Fave line?
PC: I’m the Doctor
AK: Hello sweetie 
JC: Chin boy, show me the stars and Run you clever boy
(They got into a discussion led by PC, that Steven Moffat likes to notice peoples different quirks and bring it into the script. So it’s not a trait of the Doctor but the actor e.g. like how he runs funny. 

Q: PC why does Doctor who appeal to young people today especially with an episode like “Thin Ice”?
PC: (I loved how he answered this question and I’m not going to do it justice but here goes) There are a lot of things going on in the world right now which are bad, terrible and crazy. And it’s up to writers to put across a message about the times we live in. The Doctor sees things from a different perspective from all of time and space, to see what’s truly good and what’s truly bad. It’s in the Doctor’s character and we all have to keep saying it

Q: Do they have any input into how their character is written?
JC: The script is fluid during filming and Moffat can put a joke she said before hand into the script
AK: Likes how Moffat writes characters to be unique, so they have their own speech pattern. You can see a line without naming a character, but you can still picture exactly who would say it
PC: Even though he doesn’t change the lines they can interpret and deliver the lines differently from how they are written in the script

Q: Fave episode?
JC: Vincent and the Doctor, likes she get to meet such influential people from the past
AK: Also really loved Vincent and the Doctor, and that the Doctor was able to take him into the future and show him how people admired his genius and talent (honestly one of my fave scenes also)
PC:  Frontier in Space (To him only six people cheered after he said this so jokingly wondered if we are all really Doctor Who fans in the audience) 

Just some things I took note of

  • JC knew for a year she was leaving the show. They had already decided that Clara could not return to Earth, so she was happy with the ending
  • AK told us David Tennant loves playing cards. And him and Catherine Tate played a game between takes which she joined, to name a band from the last letter of the previous band named. They all got so into it they were more into the game than the actual scenes
  • Alex was asked if she would do a show with John Barrowman as River Song and Captain Jack Harkness. She walked over to Peter and covered his ears by placing his head against her stomach and covering the other with her hand, and whispered yes into the microphone.  
  • They are all for the next Doctor being a girl, PC added a woman as well. If they could choose an actress to be the Doctor AK choose Frances de la Tour, PC choose Melissa McCarthy, and JC declined to answer sort of hinting she could be in the running (the host added because the Doctor can choose a face he has known i.e. like PC)
  • AK says she can’t have a fave Doctor because it’s the same person but he is like a snake which sheds its skin (loved the metaphor), but River Song enjoys that the different Doctors come in different shapes and sizes ;)
  • PC told us his punk rock band was called Dream Boys (was very embarrassed by this admission) and his stage outfit was a white shirt and a bow tie. So he has always loved bow ties
  • The fave character AK has played is Lady Macbeth. She never grew up believing she would be on tv as Britain doesn’t have Hollywood like America. So hoped to make it in theater 
  • PC was asked what it was like being a side character on DW before becoming the Doctor. He gave a funny excerpt of how he sneaked into the Tardis and played with the console because he thought it would be his one and only chance in the cheapest toga ever made (thankfully it wasn’t)

concept: 

A dragon with two heads. It is not an emperor, but because of the stigma caused by emperors it is often rejected. Both heads are the same consciousness, but it takes a lot of concentration to control both at the same time with precision.

Dragons like this who have immense concentration are among the most dangerous in battle.

3

Imagine:

Theo climbed out of the ground and gasped for air, he was covered in mud and dirt. But he was still attractive.

You took a step back and held on to Liam’s arm. He took a step in front of you and Hayden gripped on to Kira’s sword ready to send him back.

Theo finally looked up at his surroundings, he didn’t look around properly because the first thing his eyes landed on was you. His heart started to speed up and tears formed in his eyes. You were all he’d thought about when he was down in hell; he’d dreamt of you. Theo had always loved you but from a distance. He’d never gotten the chance to tell you.

“Y/n? I-is that you?"he asked, the tears spilling down his cheeks.

"Thank god, it’s really you"he walked towards you but Liam stood in his way.
You sighed. Although Theo had torn the pack apart and tried to do a lot of bad things you couldn’t help but feel sorry for him.

"Liam, it’s okay"you nodded.
Liam and Hayden hesitantly moved out of the way. Theo slowly made his way towards you. You wrapped your arms around his body and he did the same. His arms snaking around your waist and holding you tight. You sat on the floor resting against the walls. He sobbed as you cradled him. All he needed was a hug.

He was shaking, maybe he was cold or frightened but you’d never seen him like this.

"I don’t have any powers"Theo spoke to Liam.

"We need to send him back"Hayden replied.

"NO!"you said almost immediately, trying to defend Theo.

"Please don’t send him back"you mumbled as you ran your hands through his messy hair. You felt his grip on you tighten.

"But y/n, there’s nothing he can help us with"Liam said sadly.

"Maybe he’s learnt his lesson"you protested. Theo glanced up at you, his gaze was full of adoration. You had never stuck up for him before you were always the first one to push him away.

"Where’s Scott? Where’s Stiles?"Theo asked.

"You remember Stiles?"Hayden asked.

"Why wouldn’t he remember Stiles?"Theo replied confused.

"See? He can help so Theo is staying"you raised your eyebrows at everyone.

•keith adopted every little reptile he’d find near his shack
•all of them had names
•he named a lizard grego once
•he had like 4 snakes named alfie because he thought they were the same snake
•he would also find succulents and plants and plant them near his shack
•he would talk to them sometimes
•he made up his own constellations at night
•He’d tell his animals friends and plant friends about his new constellations
•"I named that one Diane because that’s what my dad called mom"
•keith would still talk to his parents out loud sometimes
•mostly out of spite
•"look at me, Jack. this is how you take care of something. fuck you jack"
•he loved his plants and reptile friends
•he continued to name the constellations when he became a paladin
•he also named every animal or plant they came across in his head