this is sports center

Pasillos y rampas bajo las gradas, Estadio Azteca, Calz de Tlalpan 3465, Santa Ursula Coapa, Coyoacán, Ciusws de México 1966  

Arqs. Pedro Ramírez Vázquez y Rafael Mijares  

Foto. Francisco Uribe

Corridors and ramps under the stands, Azteca Stadium, Calzada de Tlalpan 3465, Santa Ursula Coapa, Coyoacan, Mexico City 1966

Day One Hundred and Fourteen

-For reasons unknown, a woman decided to hurl an insult at her daughter. The daughter crumbled before me, completely shattered by the words her mother chose. I never knew how powerful the phrase “nasty grape” could be until this moment.

-I have found that we are stocking prom-style dresses for young girls, so that when big sister is getting fancied up, they can join in the fun. Few concepts this pure have ever existed.

-I followed a trail of CDs through the store, ranging from G-Eazy in the boys section to Queen and Prince in girls. After this, the trail went cold. This being said, I will pursue this case until my dying day. I will not rest until I have my answers.

-I would like to personally and sincerely thank the parent who left a half-empty juice pouch strewn across a shelf of clothing. Were it not for you, mysterious caretaker, I would never have such a solid grasp on the extent of the evils of man. 

-As tends to happen, another shift in softlines has exposed me to the greatest clothing line ever composed: Dr. Seuss for toddlers. If anyone with the proper capabilities is reading this, I am fully prepared to give four feet of my height to make this my wardrobe.

-What I heard: stampeding zebras coming my way. What I saw: a mother-daughter pair in ill-fitting flip-flops. What I felt: disappointed.

-I found a shirt in the infants department sporting a solar system centered around a pup in a spaceship. To top it all off and cement it as a tangible vision of my soul, the entire thing was glow-in-the-dark. I am once again wishing to lose three-quarters of my height.

-A child discovered the magnificent wonders of paying with cash. Upon realizing that if you hand a cashier money, you will be given back your purchase AND more money, this youngster’s life has been irrevocably changed for the better.

-A man came through my lane, his arms full of joy and happiness. In one, a sweet newborn rested; upon the other, a tattoo reading “4:20.”

Mom, my depression is a shape shifter.
One day it is as small as a firefly in the palm of a bear,
The next, it’s the bear.
On those days I play dead until the bear leaves me alone.
I call the bad days: “the Dark Days.”
Mom says, “Try lighting candles.”
When I see a candle, I see the flesh of a church, the flicker of a flame,
Sparks of a memory younger than noon.
I am standing beside her open casket.
It is the moment I learn every person I ever come to know will someday die.
Besides Mom, I’m not afraid of the dark.
Perhaps, that’s part of the problem.
Mom says, “I thought the problem was that you can’t get out of bed.”
I can’t.
Anxiety holds me a hostage inside of my house, inside of my head.
Mom says, “Where did anxiety come from?”
Anxiety is the cousin visiting from out-of-town depression felt obligated to bring to the party.
Mom, I am the party.
Only I am a party I don’t want to be at.
Mom says, “Why don’t you try going to actual parties, see your friends?”
Sure, I make plans. I make plans but I don’t want to go.
I make plans because I know I should want to go. I know sometimes I would have wanted to go.
It’s just not that fun having fun when you don’t want to have fun, Mom.
You see, Mom, each night insomnia sweeps me up in his arms dips me in the kitchen in the small glow of the stove-light.
Insomnia has this romantic way of making the moon feel like perfect company.
Mom says, “Try counting sheep.”
But my mind can only count reasons to stay awake;
So I go for walks; but my stuttering kneecaps clank like silver spoons held in strong arms with loose wrists.
They ring in my ears like clumsy church bells reminding me I am sleepwalking on an ocean of happiness I cannot baptize myself in.
Mom says, “Happy is a decision.”
But my happy is as hollow as a pin pricked egg.
My happy is a high fever that will break.
Mom says I am so good at making something out of nothing and then flat-out asks me if I am afraid of dying.
No.
I am afraid of living.
Mom, I am lonely.
I think I learned that when Dad left how to turn the anger into lonely —
The lonely into busy;
So when I tell you, “I’ve been super busy lately,” I mean I’ve been falling asleep watching Sports Center on the couch
To avoid confronting the empty side of my bed.
But my depression always drags me back to my bed
Until my bones are the forgotten fossils of a skeleton sunken city,
My mouth a bone yard of teeth broken from biting down on themselves.
The hollow auditorium of my chest swoons with echoes of a heartbeat,
But I am a careless tourist here.
I will never truly know everywhere I have been.
Mom still doesn’t understand.
Mom! Can’t you see that neither can I?
—  “Explaining My Depression to My Mother: A Conversation” by Sabrina Benaim

I’m just picturing professional baseball player Derek Hale getting heckled by a fan as he stands near third base.

Said fan is tall with mess brown hair and is wearing his hat backwards as he yells at Derek. Usually he just tunes it out, but this guy is cute and the way he waves his hands is kind of distracting.

It’s the top of the third and they’re already up by 5 runs so Derek allows himself to listen to the fan.

“Hale! Hale! I know you’re not a pitcher or a catcher but would you do either with me?”

Derek can feel his ears burning red and is very thankful that the fan can’t see it.

The next inning he hears, “Derek! You’re ass looks delightful in those pants.”

The game keeps going and the fan keeps yelling, he can’t even call it heckling, it’s more like the guy is hitting on him.

So the game ends and he’s signing some kids hats and taking pictures when he sees the guy standing a few rows back, a little smirk on his face when Derek catches his eye.

“Want an autograph?” Derek calls and he sees the guy step forward.

“Sure thing,” He said, holding out his hat. “Make it out to Stiles.”

“What’s a Stiles?”

“My name.”

Derek laughed and signed the hat, handing it back and grinning as Stiles saw the 7 digits on it, his eyes widening.

“That’s a phone number.”

“Yep.”

“I’ll call you then,” Stiles said, his eyes still wide.

And he did.

A few years later Stiles sat on the third baseline, hat backwards and a Hale jersey on. The game ended with a win for the Dodgers, Derek hitting a walk-off homer to win.

After the game he did his usual routine of signing autographs and then he walked over to Stiles, pulling him into a kiss for the whole world to see and then pulled out a ring.

Stiles obviously said yes and the proposal made the top ten plays on Sports Center, so did the walk off home run, but no one was talking about that.

Tinaco y Frontones, Parque Deportivo Mundet, av. Ejército Nacional 11245, Col. Irrigación, Miguel Hidalgo, Ciudad de México 1948

Arq. José Villagrán Garcia

Fotos: Guillermo Zamora

Water tank and handball courts, Mundel Sports Park, av. Ejercito Nacional 1124, Irrigation, Miguel Hidalgo,  Mexico City, 1948

Jake English likes to fight, and likes the Brobot.


TW: Physicality, Discussion of Physical combat

So, like. It’s long past time I wrote about my favorite character in this webcomic.

Jake English is the best and most interesting character in Homestuck, and it’s pretty tragic that barely anybody knows it. This is partly due to Jake’s narrative and personality being one of the most understated and subtle in the comic, but it’s also due to a Fandom Narrative building up around him that unfortunately  paves over a lot of Jake’s most unique and interesting character traits.

Let’s try and rediscover this diamond in the rough as we wait for the game that will largely center around an alternate version of him, yeah? Here, I’m going to debunk some pretty common misconceptions about Jake, what he likes, and what he dislikes. 

Brawls, Wrestling–Scrums and Whatnot. And the Brobot.

Let’s put it plainly: Jake English likes fights. A lot of the discourse surrounding Jake’s relationship with the Brobot seems to ignore this, or implies that the Brobot, like, Ruined Fighting for him somehow because it was outside of what he initially envisioned when Dirk sent it:


A point commonly further backed up with this quote Jake gives Jane: 

There’s a few issues with this interpretation. Jake’s initial negative reaction is his very first encounter with the Brobot, and his quote with Jane is one he delivers as a passing remark. And by simply comparing Jake’s actions before and after the Brobot is sent, we can tell Jake really wouldn’t rather deal with the monsters.

Before the Brobot is sent, when Jake is 13, he explicitly avoids going outside:

Which is easy to link to being afraid of the monsters, since Jake complains about them himself…

And has no problem going outside three years later, after the Brobot is sent. To some extent, this can be put down to Jake’s increased experience and competence. But…

That clearly doesn’t account for the entire shift, since Jake does indeed need the Brobot to save him. I’ll come back to that later, but really, we don’t even need to do all this backwards story introspection to decide what Jake Really Feels. It would be easier to just listen to the guy himself. 

So yes, Jake complains about the Brobot to Jane in one passing remark…while he’s still dancing around the tangled web of his relationships with Jane, Dirk, and Roxy. A period of time when Jake, by his own admission, is thinking very much about what other people think and not entirely being honest with the people around him. 

What does Jake say when he is being honest, though? What does he tell John in his letter, which Jake wrote when he was 16, after 3 years of dealing with the Brobot?

What does he tell Caliborn–who’s opinion he doesn’t care about–after entering the session, after 6 months of dating Dirk?

And what does he tell Jane about the Brobot when he’s actually being honest with her–which he’ll CONTINUE to do for six months, complaining about all of Dirk’s myriad issues and shortcomings as a romantic partner…without ever once bringing up the specter of physical fear or discomfort?

Wait, hang on. Let’s zoom in on that one, that one’s important:

Woah. Is that Jake conceptually linking the Brobot…to the thing he was most consistently excited about for the entire comic? Interesting. Wild. What could it mean. It would almost imply that after spending three years with the thing, he doesn’t really hate the experience of having it in his life. 

Again, Jake is no stranger to complaining about Dirk over the course of their session–he complains to Jane endlessly about him, as well as to Erisol and even Caliborn a little. (Though never Roxy, hmm…I wonder why…(I know why and I’ll get to it in another post.))

But he never really complains about fighting or about the Brobot in general, and his general attitude towards fights seems to be changed absolutely not at all whatsoever–right up to [S] Credits.

And he ultimate views Dirk as a figure of comfort and safety, so much so that he trusts Dirk with protecting him even more than he trusts Grandma or his own powers–after all, even after Brain Ghost Dirk tells him that he wouldn’t need him if he unlocked his hope potential, Jake still chooses to simply make Brain Ghost Dirk real rather than doing anything on his own when he wants to feel safe:


So yeah, I find the idea that Jake was bothered by the Brobot on any meaningful level pretty hard to square with the avalanche of counterevidence that is in the canon. The Brobot was an imperfect gift, but Jake still ultimately enjoyed it.  

Jake English likes to fight. Plain and simple. This is weird to a lot of people, and that’s fine, but it’s not actually that uncommon.

There’s plenty of sports that center around fighting or come with the risk of physical harm, like boxing, martial arts, etc. I’m a longtime fencer, and I genuinely liked going without protective padding and getting bruised from the sword impacts. Physicality appeals to some people. 

Jake’s love for fighting established, feel free to join me tomorrow and we’ll take on a smaller issue. A tighter one. 


I’ve written an obnoxious amount about Dirk, but seeing how quickly I was able to put that Dirk post out, I decided I’d like to use the next couple days to put out similar smaller posts about the other Alphas–Jake, Roxy, and Jane, In that order.

I’ve got at least two more posts of Jake in me before we move on to Roxy, and I should be putting out at least one of these posts a day–the next one’s already pretty much written, so I may post it early in the day tomorrow.
 
Hopefully, by doing this I can help people understand just how tangled and complicated the tangles of mutual hurt and mutual love are in this group of friends, and why I love this severely underrated group of Homestuck characters.

If you enjoyed this post and think others like it would be interesting to you, well–stay tuned. If you have a counterargument or you disagree with this post, feel free to respond and I’ll do my best to get back to you. I enjoy testing my ideas so long as we’re all nice about it.

Keep rising. 

Vista de la entrada, Unidad Deportiva “Presidente Adolfo López Mateos”,  av. Cristóbal Colón 2189, Colón Industrial, Guadalara, Jalisco, México 1962

Arq. Alejandro Zohn

View of the entrance, “President Adolfo Lopez Mateos” Sports Center, av. Cristobal Colon 2189, Colon Industrial, Guadalara, Jalisco Mexico 1962

catears00  asked:

What is everyone's dream job?

Mikasa: Mother
Reiner: Professional sports dude
Bertholdt: Call center dude
Annie: Nurse
Eren: Artist
Jean: Photographer
Marco: Kindergarden teacher
Sasha: Veterinarian
Connie: Taxi driver
Historia: Working at child support
Armin: Marine biologist
Ymir: Freelancer for whatever
Levi: Tea shop owner
Hanji: Biologist/Chemist in a hospital lab
Erwin: Teacher
Nanaba: Chef
Mike: Dog trainer

washingtonpost.com
Doctor at center of USA Gymnastics scandal left warning signs at Michigan State
More than 100 women have filed sexual assault complaints against Larry Nassar, who had been a celebrity of sports medicine.
By https://www.facebook.com/will.hobson.39
  • MSU has gotten complaints against Larry Nassar since 1997, but MSU gymnastics coach Kathie Klages said it was just a misunderstanding.
  • A softball player says that she complained about Nassar in the early 2000s, but the MSU trainers said it was a legitimate medical treatment.
  • Nassar was questioned by police in 2004, but there were no criminal charges
  • MSU did an official investigation of Larry Nassar in 2014, but didn’t tell USAG. USAG did an official investigation of him in 2015, but didn’t tell MSU. Both let him retire quietly with his reputation in tact and didn’t tell any of the high schools or clubs he continued to work at.
  • During the 2014 MSU investigation, William Strampel (MSU dean of osteopathic medicine) allowed Nassar to continue to treat patients after Nassar sent him a video of him treating a young gymnast that he says he sent to the Romanian national team therapist, so they could treat their top 2013 Euros gymnast the same way.
  • MSU closed the 2014 investigation and declared that Nassar’s treatment was just misinterpreted. Strampel and coworkers in emails said they were glad to have Nassar back in full practice.
  • In September 2016, Indystar emailed Nassar about the claims from Jamie Dantzscher (who was anonymous in her claims at the time, but has no come forward publicly) and Rachael Denhollander. Nassar forwarded this email to Strampel and Strampel told him that he was on his side and wished him luck.
  • Nassar said that he was grateful for all the messages of support he got from other gymnasts, coaches, and doctors and that he wanted to take advantage of it before more people came out against him and the 2nd media storm came.
  • As more people came out against Nassar, Strampel finally fired him.
  • Klages got fired as well for giving her gymnasts a passionate defense of Nassar.
  • Brooke Lenman, a colleague of Nassar’s at MSU, resigned after Strampel accused her of knowing about the 2015 USAG investigation, but not telling anyone at MSU. Strampel says that other people at MSU knew and that she wasn’t allowed to talk about it because it involved potentially criminal conduct.
  • President of USAG, Steve Penny, also resigned.
  • It seems like USAG, USOC, and MSU are all complicit in the abuse and need to fire a lot more people. From the court documents, it seems like USOC was against banning coaches for sexual abuse without a proper hearing, but USAG was in favor of it back in the 90s. But even after USOC policies changed in the last 7 years, USAG has not been alerting authorities about sexual abuse claims and wants an official complaint from the victim or their parents. MSU has had complaints about Nassar since the 90s and did an official investigation in 2014, but didn’t fire him until 2016 when victims came forward publicly.

El Gimnasio durante construcción, Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey (TEC de Monterrey), esquina de av. Junco De La Vega y calle Luis Elizondo, Tecnológico, Monterrey,  Nuevo León, México 1965

Arq. Ricardo Guajardo

The Gym during construction, Technological Institute of Monterry (TEC de Monterrey), corner of av. Junco De La Vega and calle Luis Elizondo, Tecnologico, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico 1965