this is hero status

10

toot toot all aboard the athenaboat bound for long island, ny 

based on a conversation into which the question of the atlantic ocean was brought. like how do they plan on crossing the ocean if nico can only shadow jump like a couple hundred miles at a time with this enormous hecking statue

the statue would probably be able to float?? it’s made more of wood than stone 

(adventures in crap backgrounds :D ))

anonymous asked:

You said its much more interesting to have a character try to fit into their role and fail then a princess character who automatically rebels. Can you tell me more about it and what makes it interesting? I really like your insight when it comes to stories and fairytales.

Ah! Thank you! Well, I really dislike the ‘Rebellious Princess’ narrative for three reasons, and I’ll just go into them below before talking about more interesting approaches

  1. It’s Classist

This is the most obvious issue. Your hero is a rebel princess, born into a life of status and privilege. She is the 1%.

You remember this comic making its rounds on social media? 

Your rebel Princess is Richard.

Every time the Princess laments that she’s trapped by her own wealth and status, she ignores the fact that her problems are minute and petty in the grander narrative. Princesses are inherently privileged, and it’s ignorant to ignore their own wealth in favour of chasing some bohemian ‘freedom’. 

We get it, kiddo. You hate needlework and you don’t want to be Queen. But your kingdom is in the middle ages, people eat dirt and no one is happy. The Princess might yearn for some vague concept of ‘something more’, but that’s myopic and selfish when her people yearn for electricity and proper sanitation. 

I have extreme difficulty enjoying Star vs the Forces of Evil.

2. It pits the hero against other women to make her rebellion look good. 

So you have your Princess who rejects the institution of traditional femininity. All well and good. But in order for her to be rebellious, there must be an institution in the first place for her to reject.

Enter The Institution. Call her St Olga’s Reform School for Wayward Princesses, call her Prudence, or Marina Del Rey. No matter what she looks or acts like, you know you’ve seen her before. She’s prudish, traditionally feminine, tough as nails, and probably sews her own ballgowns on her weekends off. 

She is a perfectly good woman in any other sense, but since she’s everything your princess doesn’t want to be, conflict has to arise from the princess fighting her and her ideals. 

And of course, the princess will win, because traditional femininity is evil. 

Oh, Prudence, you deserved so much more than the Disney Sequel you got.

In a feminist world there’s nothing wrong with fighting old ideas of what women should act like - but in a postmodern feminist world, one must be aware that some women willingly are quite happy to be traditionally feminine, and some don’t have the luxury of choice to pick whatever kind of femininity they embody.

Pitting the ‘feminist’ rebel princess against traditionally feminine women is a microaggression in itself: we have never needed to sell men an empowerment narrative by pitting men against each other, so why start here? Also note that Disney is extremely fond of this, especially in marketing Frozen and its reboot movies by saying it’s better than ‘classic princess’ movies because ‘classic princesses’ needed men:

“That’s a bit different from the animation, I think, it’s not about Cinderella just being rescued by a man.”  

3. It’s a White-Feminist narrative. 

Oh GOD is it a White-Feminist narrative!

I said before that some woman don’t have the luxury to be rebel princesses, and some willingly want to be traditionally femme. This is especially so in POC cultures. 

In Chinese culture, the concept of filial piety is a very important one: to be dutiful and respectful to your parents, and placing your family’s honour and their values above your own. 

Mulan does not have the luxury of ‘rebellion’. Rebellion would dishonour her family, rebellion would shame her parents. Mulan’s entire character arc exists to teach her to balance her parent’s needs with her own, and it ends with her bestowing her war prizes to her father - at the height of her own glory she doesn’t forget where she came from - and it’s the greatest show of honour she could possibly give.

To turn Mulan into a rebel princess would be to undermine everything her culture and the folklore surrounding her represents. A lot of these themes are repeated in Moana - how much of yourself do you give up to make your parents happy? What is the true meaning of tradition? When you exist for other people can you still know who you are? 

Originally posted by tarajis

Moana is great. Watch it. 

Making White Feminist statements like ‘my princesses isn’t like a classic princess! she feminist and doesnt need to listen to anyone!’ does a massive disservice to other cultures who have to balance force of will with filial piety. 

So, about those Interesting Narratives…

Originally posted by a-dark-and-terrible-thing

Pans Labyrinth (2006) is thematically about ‘rebellion’ - it’s set in the Spanish Civil War and half of its narrative is about fighting a military dictatorship. It’s other half is about Ofelia (a fairy changeling), who is given instructions so that she can return to the magical world. Ofelia proceeds to mess all of them up: she eats from a magical table when she’s told to take no food, she refuses to kill an infant to open a gate to her homeworld. While excited to be a princess, Ofelia struggles to cope with the morally dubious or downright strange demands she’s presented with. Her rebellion isn’t a girl with a weapon in her hand: it’s a girl who legitimately wants to be a princess but isn’t cruel enough to do what it takes to get there.  

I wanted to give others - and they are plenty - but this post has gone on long enough. ;w; Do come back to me if you want to know more, anon! I’m overjoyed to be able to talk about this!

2

I started this last year after I read Blood of Olympus, found the unfinished work-in-progress recently, and worked it into this during some downtime. 

After all that happened to Reyna and Nico, I just want them to chill together forever in New Rome looking at pictures of cute dogs.

The Last Word

I was rewatching that episode of Community where Abed and Troy kept hitting each other with pillows because they didn’t want their friendship to be over, and I just kind of liked the idea of an argument stretching out ridiculously long just because 2 people don’t want to stop talking ^^

college AU.

read it here on AO3!

“Dean, this is Cas - Cas, Dean,” Jo said, calling over the thudding music in the bar where they were standing, propping up the bar. She had a hand on Dean’s shoulder, and she gave him a little shake. “I’ve been meaning to introduce you guys since forever. I just know you’re gonna get on great. Cas, Dean likes philosophy, and psychology - that kind of thing!”

“I’m, uh - an armchair philosopher at best,” Dean said, throwing Jo a look that said, as clearly as he could without words, don’t play me up too much. Cas, the guy standing in front of him, was quite clearly out of Dean’s league - tall, lean, with the looks of an Athenian hero and the expression of a Roman statue, chiselled and unsmiling. Dean took a hefty swig of his drink, and smiled charmingly.

Well, he thought, you never know until you’ve tried.

“So, are you a Freud or a Jung kind of guy?” he said. Jo clapped his shoulder and moved off, evidently satisfied with the opener and feeling as though her introductory duties were complete. Dean watched after her for a second as she went, taking her social skills with her.

It wasn’t that Dean was bad in social situations - it was only that when there was just him and an undeniably cute guy, things tended to get a little… flustered. Jo, on the other hand, was perfectly at ease, and good at smoothing over the stupid things his runaway mouth tended to say -

“You can go and talk to her instead,” said Cas, and Dean started and looked back at him guiltily. Cas’ expression was unreadable, watching him watch after Jo. “Please, feel no obligation to enjoy my company.”

Dean blinked. Cas raised his eyebrows.

“I’m, uh, I’m - uh,” Dean said, wrongfooted. “I was just -”

“And I think - Jung,” Cas said, cutting through his fumbling. “Freud’s theories are too rooted in misogyny and phobia to be of any interest beyond the influential and contextual, for me.”

Dean swallowed.

This is going great, said a little voice in his head.

Keep reading

ron weasley is so important

we need characters who have doubts and don’t always hide them. we need characters who are embarrassed, we need characters who have a bit of prejudice, and we need characters who can be selfish, because it actually gives them someplace to grow. it makes writing them important, because they are natural people.

ron weasley is everything we need, because in all his flaws, he matures, and he’s loyal, and he owns up to his mistakes. it’s important for readers to know that it takes time and effort to get to that point. recently i’ve been noticing this thing on tumblr where a naturally flawed person or character is completely disregarded and attacked, and i get it. we want to correct things, but ron weasley is the perfect example of being – well – normal, and actually transforming into a better person. he’s the prime example of the “problematic fave” because he’s awesome, and has flaws. but the thing is, that itself is normal, and we can’t treat it like the plague.

ron doesn’t refuse to change, and he doesn’t want to hurt people, but in his youth and jealousy, he can’t really help the way he acts all the time. and that’s completely okay, because what matters is that he actually tries to get there. but it lets readers who are familiar with “problematic traits” feel some sort of comfort, because things like jealousy and embarrassment can’t just disappear because someone tells you you need to get better.

i think this was already clear in the books, and i know we all praise book ron because he’s witty and a great friend, but it’s also really important to not only acknowledge his flaws, but accept and embrace them. because it’s cool to see someone like ron, who went from belittling house elves to wanting to make sure they were safe for example, actually go from point ‘a’ to point ‘b’

so seriously PLEASE REMEMBER RON’S FLAWS. don’t just attack a character because they have undesirable traits because lots of us can relate to ron, and he’s a huge source of inspiration and admiration. he shows us it’s possible to not be the “scum of the earth” just because we have resentment and doubts and insecurities

Please consider

Naruto was supposed to be in love with Sakura, Iruka was like a dad to him, Kakashi was also like a father figure, Naruto had finally befriended the kids at the academy and yet he didn’t even think twice when it came to leaving them all for a couple years to train to bring Sasuke back. Naruto went against everyone who wanted to kill Sasuke, risking his status as the village hero and the support of his mentors and friends. Naruto was willing to die with Sasuke and leave everyone and his dreams behind. Between Sasuke and literally EVERYONE ELSE he knows, he would choose Sasuke every time. I don’t know how to interpret that as anything but love.

this was going to be a small project to alleviate stress and art block but i underestimated how much i missed drawing pjo/hoo and especially these three so have a team statue drawing

(i had a ridiculous amount of fun with this rip))

anonymous asked:

Was there any reason for this TG chapter being a just long sex scene. Like I'd understand a few pages to show they've done the deed, but an entire chapter? After Goat has been forced to scatter to the wind, Re being attacked by a squad of half-ghouls who are tracking them and probably not far behind, along with the unknown status of Yoriko and Goats members. Maybe it's cause i'm not into shipping, but i feel there's more important plot stuff we should be focusing on instead of Awkward first time

Well, yes. Of course there was a reason for such a long chapter of just sex.

First of all, remember a few days ago I talked about pacing? I mentioned that Ishida’s usual rhythm is usually ‘scene-interlude’. The scene was a conflict with Mutsuki that escalated into a conflict with Mutsuki and Aura Jr, which then escalated into a three-way conflict with the Oggai that got cut off rather abruptly. So the reader was supposed to still be a bit keyed up. Add to that Touka and Kaneki coming off the previous interlude, which was about them having sex and made this interlude seem less sudden, and this chapter was actually not a bad place to have the sex scene. Since it was sex after a fight, the reader sort of got calmer by the end of it together with the characters.

Next is Touka and Kaneki’s status as main hero and main heroine. Shipping aside, their status as a future couple has been made clear from the very beginning. Now, immediately before this chapter we had Suzuya tell us there’s blood in the water, so we know the stakes are high and no one is safe. Considering Kaneki and Touka both went through a lot and the readers were (at the very least supposed to be) waiting for them to come together for ages, the length of the scene represented an emotional crescendo of the main character finally achieving something good in his life.

If the rest of TG:re were well-paced, it might have even registered as such for me. As it is, I understand the impatience, anon.

Supervillains AU

Characters A, B, C, and D are a group of “supervillains” that started off as superheros – albeit slightly misbehaved ones that didn’t get along with the city’s other heroes – but they didn’t live up to the “family friendly” image standards that are required to maintain a hero status, so Characters A, B, C, and D now live a life of petty revenge or slightly illegal whims.

  • Character A however is an honest to goodness eldritch being who was accidentally summoned by Character B and is now bound to do their bidding.
  • Character B used to be a harmless magic user, but now they’re the caretaker of Character A.
  • Character C is convinced they’re the sole voice of reason in the group and leads most of the missions.
  • Character D quit their hated part time retail job for a life of villainy and now works as the group’s secretary. Their paycheck doesn’t always come on time – depending on how good of a week the villain’s had – but it pays better than minimum wage.

The group is actually pretty harmless in real life and are all the sorts of people to give people directions or rescue a stray cat or help out a confused old lady, but when the city’s superheroes start acting up and using their hero status for devious deeds, it’s up to the supervillains to save the city.

Reaper76 spiderman-esque AU where Gabriel and Jack have known each other since forever and during their college days Gabriel gets this super cool powers but he doesn’t fucking know what to do with them, so he trusts Jack with this because Jack’d know what to do since he’s the nerd with all those superheroes comics and shit.

Gabriel: *gives Jack a sketch that seems drawn by a child of his costume* So what do you think?

Jack: …Gabe, no.

Gabriel: Why not? What’s wrong with it?

Jack: What’s wrong with it? Gabe, this looks like a supervillain custome! You’ll confuse people! Criminals won’t know if you’re an ally or what.

Gabriel: So? That will give me an advantage over the enemy. 

Jack: No. Draw it again. And i don’t know why you need all those guns. 

Gabriel; It’s the american way, Jack.

A headcannon I have for the Mistborn universe is that with Vin’s status as a religious/historical/legendary hero figure, I can see them making movies and other forms of art media doing different interpretations of her life. Including a Disney-esque movie with her Disney prince Elend and talking animal sidekick TenSoon, and all the violence toned down.