this is going to get 5 notes

anonymous asked:

Started a new job and got extremely ill my third week. Called in sick, spent the day sleeping in bed. 5 days later, the day before my next shift, manager emails me telling me that I need to make sure to bring paperwork from the hospital proving that I am now good to work. I told her I didn't have any, as I don't have insurance and couldn't afford to go in. Her response? 'Well go to the doctor today and get a note. You need one to come back.' Okay, I'm not coming back then. Not worth a $400 visit

anonymous asked:

Do you think it's okay to eat pickles during a fast since they're 0 calories

listen, i’m not good at fasting and i generally end up making my own rules for it. personally i think that eating a pickle is breaking a fast but if you went into your fast think “i’m only going to eat a pickle” then it wouldn’t be considered breaking it.
fasting isn’t important though so if you’re hungry just eat the pickle. it won’t kill you.

side note: i’m not sure what kind of pickles you’re eating but i’ve never seen any that are 0 calories. the ones i get are normally 5 cal for 1/3 of a pickle. not that 5 calories matter, i just wanted to let you know.

be safe and be kind to yourself friend ☺️

to other mentally ill artists who are obsessed with getting better

- Finished Pieces TM are NOT the only works that matter. That half-lined sketch is good. That page of nothing but shapes and doodles is progress. If you’re doing whatever it is that you CAN do that day, you’re doing well

- take. BREAKS. as often as you need to. stop when you gotta. if you try to dig into tomorrow’s spoons to finish something, trust me, you’re going to hate yourself and whatever you’re working on later

- if you really want to, you CAN draw (or paint, or sculpt, or craft etc.) every day

- everything counts. everything. can’t draw for more than 20 minutes today? you drew. less than 5? you drew. take a pencil and draw three different circles on a sticky note. you drew. lay out your arm and trace whatever comes to mind with you finger. everything counts.

- if you drew SOMETHING today, you gained more experience than someone who did not

- draw whatever you want

- reward yourself for it

- don’t get so wrapped up in something that you forget to eat, drink water or sleep please. if you can’t make yourself care about what it does to your body, remember it WILL affect your productivity, which will lead to Bad Times, again, trust me

- you are SOMEONE’S art goals

- your art is good

- “this person doesn’t know me or my art, how do they know it’s good-” shh. doesn’t matter. its good

Back to School/Uni Tips!

I’m headed into my 3rd year of uni, so I thought I’d make a post sharing my tips on how to do well in school, not burn out, and keep your mental health relatively stable.

1. Snacks - seriously, don’t leave home without at least 2 substantial snacks in your bag. If you’re go-go-going all day and suddenly your sitting in a lecture about to crash cause you haven’t eaten anything all day, you’re gonna want snacks. Some suggestions: Cashews (they’re not super loud/crunchy, so they’re perfect for lecture snackin’), a granola bar, an apple, cherry tomatoes, trail mix.

2. Don’t buy the textbook before you go to your first class - I’ve worked at a university bookstore for 2 years, and every year, people end up buying 700$ worth of first year text books, and then they don’t even use them. Wait. and then wait some more. If there are required readings, then get the textbook, if your prof says there will be questions from the textbook on the exam, then get the textbook, but trust me, for 90% of first year classes (and a lot of other ones) you don’t need the textbook. SAVE YOUR WALLETS

3. Take notes efficiently - honestly the best way to take notes, is type up the lecture notes that are provided, BEFOREHAND, and then during lecture, fill in the blanks/add information/take down any important things your prof is saying as you go through the lecture on your laptop in a different color. This way you’re much less likely to miss any important information, you won’t be confused about what to take down, and you won’t fall into the trap of taking down notes that are already being provided to you. After class, or while making study notes, copy these notes out by hand to remember what you learned.

4. Keep it simple - pretty notes are GREAT if you have the time, but once you get to upper level uni, and you have 100 slides of notes to turn into study notes, you will not have the time to make your notes look aesthetically pleasing. Just get the info down so you can focus on learning it.

5. Have a designated study space - i did all of my highschool homework and studying in my bed, and 90% of the time, I ended up falling asleep. My bed wasn’t going to cut it for uni, so I got a cheap ikea desk, and it’s made me so much more organized and productive.

6. Take as much ‘you time’ as possible - take a bath. light candles. binge watch a tv show. veg out with a book for 4 hours if you have the time. do your makeup super special one day. get yourself that venti pumpkin spice latte with extra whip whenever you feel like it. Uni is a shitty time I’m not gonna lie. It’s stressful as f*ck, and whenever you can spare a couple hours or a couple dollars to TREAT YO SELF, do it.

7.  If you have anxiety, CUT THE COFFEE. caffeine is a huge trigger for anxiety. Caffeine takes away from your sleep, messes with your adrenalin systems, and can make you super paranoid and anxious all the time. 

8. If you think your in the wrong major, change it - I started in geology, and I HATED IT. Now I’m in psych and I love it. It is never too late for a change of program. If you think you’re doing something you don’t wanna do, or your not enjoying it, don’t do it.

9. For mornings you have to be ready and out the door, or if you’re a person who always runs late, have a getting-ready routine and get it down pat. Have a mental list of things you need to do, and things you need to remember, and find out how much time it takes you. Get up at 8am, shower, wash face/brush teeth, get dressed, do makeup, pack bag, remember keys, wallet, laptop, notebook, pen and train pass, have breakfast, put on shoes, leave by 9am.

10. Utilize your time in transit. - finish a reading, go over flashcards, read study notes, listen to an album you’ve been meaning to listen to, read a book, read some fanfic, idk but don’t just sit there unless just sitting there is what you need.

11. Find a hobby or passion that is separate from your school/uni life. Whether its playing sports, or running, reading, collecting plants, making scrapbooks, curating a refined taste in tea, having baths, writing in a journal, find something that if you’re bored with watching shows or studying, you can go do it, and enjoy it, and get your mind off all the other shit that’s going on in your life for awhile.

How to study:

Originally posted by slothilda

Before classes:

1 - Have a good night of sleep. 
- At least eight hours.

2 - Take some coffee before going to school. 
- Always have a snack in your bag. (Don’t study hungry)

3 - Workout.
- I know it’s going to be hard, since most of you have to wake up so early, but working out will help you to make the most out of your day. 

4 - Organize your bag the night before. 

5 - Go through what you’ll be learning on the day.
- This way you will be prepared and you can take notes about your doubts on the subjects.

6 - Listen to a badass playlist on the way to school/college.
- It will boast your motivation. 

7 - Drink a lot of water. 
- That’s a tip to the whole day, actually. Always remember to take a bottle of water or tea to school/college. 


During class:

1 - Sit in the front.
- You will understand more your teacher and be away from the noises that can take away your attention.

2 - Ask questions. (No matter how dumb you think they are.)
- Do not end a class with doubts. If you can’t ask during the class, take a note of your question on a sticker/notebook to ask later.

3 - Record the lectures.

4 - Put stickers on notes you will need to go over. 

5 - Listen to your teacher.
- Be friendly with them.
- Write down their names and contacts (number, emails, social media).

6 - Taking notes on class!

- Don’t worry about it being pretty, just make it organized and understandable so you can go over and make real notes later. 
- Always start with the subject title and date. 
- Differentiate by color your teacher’s notes and yours. Put in red (or any other color you want, actually) the important things.


After class:

1 - Eat.
- You need to replace energy!

2 - Review everything you learned on the day you learned it.

3 - Complete your homework on the day you get it. 
- Or start it, if the task is too big. 
- NEVER FALL BEHIND!

4 - Dress comfy.

5 - Have office hours in case you didn’t understand something.

6 - Watch documentaries on the topic you are currently studying.

7 - Study 30 minutes (50 minutes at the very most) and stop for 10 minutes. 
- Leave your study place when it’s break time.

8 - Turn off your phone or let it out of sight. 

9 - Test yourself/talk out loud.
- Do practice questions!

10 - Taking notes after class!

- Organize your notes by color.
- Rewrite the informations with your own words.
- When writing the new notes, make it pretty if you can. (I think it motivates me to study, looking at something well made) Otherwhise, be simple and objective, focus on the most important things.
- Go over the class recording and read the books to compare with your class notes, to make sure you didn’t forget anything.

how to survive bad school days, from morning till night

my last year of high school starts rather soon, and i’ve had more than my fair share of days when i wake up wanting to cry. there aren’t many things you can do when obligations like school force you to get over it as soon as it starts, so here are some tips to make your day better.

1. dress opposite the way you feel. even though sweats might be super tempting, dress up. wear your favorite pair of jeans, or a dress, or your cutest sneakers, even. wear bright colors at least. sweatpants and such will just make you feel even more blah and unfocused throughout the day. 

2. moisturize! this might seem like an odd idea, but moisturizing and going into school glowy and soft definitely helps me feel more comfortable and less ugh during the school day. it helps keep me in my home-y comfort zone, if that makes sense. 

3. carry something from home. this can be a book (even if you don’t read it), a tube of chapstick, a big waterbottle, etc… i have even gone as far as wrapping myself in a small blanket and walking around like that for the day. if you like this option and don’t feel comfortable wearing it, fold it up and place it in your backpack, just so you know it’s there.

4. plan out your day. even if it’s just making a mental note, tell and remind yourself of the things your going to do and when. this will get rid of any unnecessary stress and pressure. if something unexpected comes up, this will also help you manage your time a little better.

5. eat and drink happy things! pick today to pack a lunch, no matter what your usual routine is. drink plenty of water throughout this day, and eat as many fruits and veggies as you can. fill a reusable water bottle with water, fruit (like lemon or strawberries), and chia seeds! it’s perfect to sip throughout the day for a reboot or just to boost your mood. 

6. when you get home, bathe immediately! wash off the day’s dirt. drop everything as soon as you get home, and either jump in the shower or relax in a bath with your favorite soaps and scents and a book. give yourself a break before you have to get back to work.

7. don’t ignore your work. by work, i mean school work. if you’re having a bad day, don’t hesitate to take a break from talking to people or running (low-priority) errands. you don’t want to ignore schoolwork, though, because teachers aren’t the most lenient people in the world, and getting it done will take a lot off of your shoulders. pushing it away will only gain you more bad days. 

8. go to bed. get sleep! you want to be refreshed and happy for the next day, even if it’s a weekend. there’s a good chance your bad day began because you didn’t get enough sleep, or because you were ripped out of bed. reward yourself with rest after a long day. 

6

Hey guys, I’m participating to the 100 Days of Productivity Challenge by @emmastudies
Here is the highlight of the first 5 days, it’s going pretty well so far! This challenge really helps me getting motivated!

I’m posting daily on my studygram so feel free to join the fun🎓💪🏻 ig: thomstudies

Some of these will not apply to many people so pls take them with a grain of salt. Also I’ve been collecting these pretty much for the two years I’ve been in college so it’s not a guide, they’re just… random I guess.

Making friends 

Warning - specially tailored for super shy people aka me

  • There’s a thing called the ‘first week window of endless oportunities’. It’s when groups are still forming and everyone’s desperate to make friends. This is the time to put your best self forward (I’m not saying be fake, just a little extra friendly).
  • Leave. Your. Door. Open. Do it. Even if you have a roommate. Best way to make friends the first week.
  • Actually get out of your room. You’re not going to meet many people if you hole up in your room. If you have a tv room or people are watching a movie, I don’t care if you’re not interested in what they’re watching, go.
  • If you have the balls to go to the room nextdoor and introduce yourself then you probably can skip this section by all means do it!
  • But if you don’t, going from door to door asking for help with your laundry takes a lot less courage + you will learn how to do laundry. Asking to borrow something (pencil, hair tie, hair dryer) also works.
  • If you’re staying at a residence hall, ask to sit with people at lunch! Nobody is going to say no, i promise.
  • Similarly if you see someone alone, ask them to have lunch with you! 
  • Also if you meet someone you get along with, as soon as you can, ask for their number ‘so you can go to the dinning hall together’. 
  • Remember people’s names - it makes people feel like you actually care about them. I know it’s hard but make an effort. Also it just gets annoying when someone asks about your name for the fourth time. Use mnemonics if you have to.
  • Asking what someone’s major is and where they’re from is standard procedure when you meet them but it doesn’t make for an interesting conversation. Think of other questions!
  • Make sure to arrive about 10 min early to your classes. There’ll be very few people and so it’ll be easier to strike up a conversation (actually people will probably talk to you without you having to say anything which is g r e a t)
  • Say yes - as a rule of thumb, your social life should prevail over your academic life the first two weeks. This is the time where you’re not really pressed for time. Say yes to watching movies, say yes to going to lunch, say yes to going to campus events (and even to parties). Obviously don’t do anything that makes you really unconfortable but do try to step out of your comfort zone
  • Make friends with an upper-classman from your same major. Or at least be on speaking terms. Talk to them on Facebook, ask them about your major, just use any random idc excuse to introduce yourself, it doesn’t really matter how you do it.
  • Don’t go home every weekend, even if you live close by. You’ll miss out on the best of campus life and some of the most fun memories with your new friends.

Keeping your old friends

  • If you know you’re going home for the weekend, try to finish most of your assignments/studying and make time to hang out with your friends. Spending time with them is the best way to keep those friendships alive. 
  • But! Don’t worry too much if you can’t come home or make time for your friends too often, you just have to make an effort to text them regularly. It will come naturally if it’s your best friend, but don’t forget to set a reminder to text other close friends at least once every two weeks.
  • You may think you don’t care now but you will once you come home for the summer.
  • If any of your friends are staying in your hometown for college, be ready for them to get another friend group. That doesn’t mean they’ve forgotten about you, but don’t be mad if they seem to have a lot more plans that don’t involve you. You can always ask to tag along some time and maybe even become friends with these people!
  • Some people you’ll just lose contact with. Don’t fret it.

Organization

  • Please print out or buy a calendar that has a whole page for each month. With boxes preferably *shameless plug*. You may think you have it all under control but there’s nothing like being able to see all your due dates, hang out plans and laundry days at a glance. (Also js but the pilot frixion are perfect to use on calendars because they’re erasable).
  • There’s so much space under your bed. UTILIZE IT.

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Hey Emma 💛 Do you have any advice for procrastination? I also have a hard time concentrating, what do you do (or think I could do) that would help with that?

Hi! I’ve had a few questions like this recently so I’m just going to answer this one and hopefully anyone who asked a similar question will see it! But on with the answer. I think there is a few different reasons why we procrastinate so I’m going to note those down and give a few tips for each. You can obviously apply any ideas that you like regardless of what section I’ve put them under! 

1. You’ve got poor work/productivity habits. Generally you leave things until the last minute since you “work better under pressure”. (This is so me, omg.) You probably think you’ll do something after you’ve finished something else, and then never do. You get distracted whenever you’re trying to study and will sit waiting to feel motivated but it never comes. For this I’d suggest:

  • create a productive work environment - choose a space where you will actually work without distractions, organise your study space, have everything you need in easy reach. Surround yourself with things you find motivating such as quotes! 
  • write it out - write down a few manageable tasks that you need to do. Writing the actions they require will help you see what you should be doing to complete something, instead of just the overall task. One by one you’ll see yourself getting things done!
  • focus on 20-30 minute periods - generally we lose focus after a while so taking regular breaks can help give you chance to relax and refocus. Apps like Forest allow you to set a timer and will give you off your phone at the same time. Obviously if you’re being productive, don’t suddenly cut that off because it is “time for a break”.
  • use apps/browser extensions to cut out distractions - ones like RescueTime or StayFocusd will block you from checking certain sites.
  • find an accountability partner - pick someone who you can rely on to check on your regularly and see how your tasks are coming along. You can send them your to-do list and then every few hours you can update them with your progress. You won’t want to let them down.
  • use the two-minute rule - if something takes less than two minutes, do it. Don’t make an excuse, just do it. Tasks that are longer you can either delegate or defer. Here is a simple visualisation of what I mean.
  • record your progress - doing a simple “don’t break the chain” in your planner is a great way to see how productive you’re being and therefore get you more motivated to keep it up!

2. You’re feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Everything seems to be mounting up and nothing seems doable. You don’t know where or how to start. For this I’d suggest:

  • find some help - if you’re feeling like this, it is likely you need some help in some form or another. See if a family member, friend, classmate or teacher (or Google) can help or give you a starting point.
  • tell yourself that getting started is the first step - you don’t need to finish a task in a matter of minutes. Start doing something small. Maybe organise what you need, highlight the important bits of your assessment, or draft an essay plan. The secret to getting ahead is getting started!
  • divide and conquer - figure out what is the overall task that you need to do and split it into manageable parts. For instance with an essay the aim is to write it! Divide it into planning out what you want to write, any references you need, summarising a final draft and then writing each paragraph. By dividing bigger tasks into actionable parts you can reduce the obstacles and get through each part in a more timely manner.
  • reward yourself - create a reward system to celebrate completing a selection of tasks. By rewarding your progress you’ll build an incentive to work and reinforce productivity (great for your self-discipline!). 
  • learn to forgive yourself - if you have an off day, that is okay! You can’t expect to see a huge change in a short amount of time. Remember to come back to it later and try again.
  • don’t over schedule - if you’re feeling pressure from the amount of work and then the added pressure of trying to stick to a time limit, you’re just going to go crazy. Set yourself flexible times to get something done instead of being heavily structured. Give yourself time for a break and the ability to change tasks.
  • stick with one task - it can be so tempting to multitask but try not to. Try to keep focus on the what you’re doing until it is done. If you struggle with that, you could write down anything useful that you randomly think about for another task, use a break-time to think about that other task or alternate between subjects/tasks every few hours.

3. You’re a perfectionist. You either don’t want to start something out of fear you won’t get it right or you can stuck on stuck on the small details. There is a pressure to achieve “perfection”. For this I’d suggest:

  • focus on getting started, instead of finishing - it is easy to get overwhelmed thinking about what something is supposed to be like finished if you’re a perfectionist. Take things one step at a time.
  • remember that your perfectionist tendencies aren’t actually improving your work or productivity but hindering you - you’re continually setting yourself unrealistic objects and (like me) probably feel let down by yourself if you don’t reach them. Be realistic and focus on getting it done!
  • accept mistakes - you’ve written something wrong, don’t panic! Cross it out with a single line and move on. Things happen and you have to accept it. You can’t rip up the page every time you do something wrong, even if it is so tempting.
  • put things in perspective - is what you’re beating yourself up about right now going to mean anything in a week, a month, a year? Be honest if it isn’t, is it really worth putting unnecessary pressure on yourself.
  • praise yourself through the process - try not to criticise yourself but recognise your progress. 

4. You’re wanting to do something else. You find whatever you’re doing boring. You want it to be over with but don’t want to get started. The ultimate catch 22, right? For this I’d suggest:

  • remember that putting it off isn’t going to make it go away - if you leave it too long you’ll end up getting more stressed about it. Best to get it over with. 
  • plan from the get-go - once you know something is coming up (e.g. a test, an assessment, etc) make notes on it! That could be questions, annotations, potential topics, citations, etc. By making the effort to spend time reading through, you’ll save your future self some stress. Especially if it’s a topic you have forgotten. That way your notes act as a reminder so you can get started.
  • set a finish time with a reward - tell yourself that if you finish something by ..am/pm and then you can do something else. Use your self-discipline to not go back on this. Set a realistic time and try to get it complete before. If you can think that you’re doing something fun once it is completed, you’ll be more motivated to get it done.
  • make a structure - for note-taking, it can be overwhelming looking at a textbook and thinking what you’re going to write out. Make a note-taking layout/colour code that works for you and that subject. Mine is here - it just give me an idea of how I’d lay everything instead of going in with no action plan. 
  • try to make it fun - this could be using YouTube to learn or starting a study group. Use different methods for memorising information such as flashcards, mindmaps or study guides (like question/answer).
  • make the effort to refocus - if you’re finding something boring and you’re unfocused, walk away for 5 minutes, get a drink and come back. If you’re really struggling, change topics for a while. Find a point where you can finish and start doing something else that is productive. 
  • listen to some music - generally music without lyrics are best for focusing. Spotify has a great playlist for studying called ‘focus’. However I find my regular music good for getting me a little more motivated and awake. I also like writing essays to music because I weirdly sort of type in the same rhythm. Funny study hack I’ve found that works for me haha! 

I hope that is useful! I must have copied and pasted my whole answer like 5 times just incase my tab reloaded and I lost everything, luckily not! You should also check out this post for smaller motivation tips and tricks! xx

anonymous asked:

What do you do if you see police brutality? Like I know stand back and film it if you can but then what? What do you do with the film? Is there anything else you can do?

Alright I’m going to answer this for people who document police brutality against themselves and what someone who observes this violence can do. 

1. DO NOT start telling the officer(s) what you are going to do to them. If you start telling them that you know your rights have been violated and you’re going to sue, they aren’t going to cower in fear. Instead, they’re more likely going to arrest you as a means to cover the violations and work to cover up what they did/build their case to WHY they needed to use violence against you. If you were injured and need medical attention tell them “I am in need of medical assistance,” but don’t mention you are recording and documenting with plans to bring this abuse to light. 

2. To people who are victims of police violence and those who witness it: DOCUMENT EVERYTHING. When cops are exposed for their misconduct one of their defenses will be that the victims cannot clearly remember the details of the event and therefore the narrative is untrustworthy. If you are the victim, try to remember exactly what happened and document it ASAP. Try to remember important details as much as possible and write it down before you forget everything. Try to answer the place where the abuse happened, who witnessed the abuse, what did the cop(s) do, what did the cop(s) say, and try to timeline the events. Even if you don’t know the names of people who might have witnessed it, try to write down any detailed descriptions about the person.  

If you are a bystander try to film and/or document the incident. Again, don’t try to draw attention to the fact you are filming because cops will go into cover up mode. Also make sure to install and app and set up your phone so that the footage is automatically uploaded to your cloud. This is so you for sure have the footage and if any cop does try to stop you or unlawfully confiscates your phone/deletes your video it’s still there. And try to make sure you get the cop’s name and number. 

Tips for recording the police:

  • Keep calm but prepare yourself if you are confronted by a police officer. 
    If a police officer asks if or why you are recording you have the right to remain silent. The police might tell you that you are “interfering” with the scene, they might demand you move back, they might try to lower your camera down or block it. Remember that you ARE allowed to record police officers and as long as you are not being detained you can walk away.

  • As long as you, the recorder, are not suspected of a crime you do not have to show ID or give them any information. They might try to get your device handed to them or get you to show ID but you can ask “What crime am I suspected of,” and “Am I being detained.” If they say “no,” then you don’t have to give over any of this. 

  • If you have a smartphone, consider downloading an app that will stream and store the recordings offsite. For both Android and iOS you can use apps like Bambuser, Fi-Vo Film, Justin.TV, Ustream, and Vimeo. These live streaming apps will capture both audio and video and (as long as you’re able to get an Internet signal) push the content offsite. If you are in a location with no Internet access, many apps will save the streaming data to your phone, and upload once the device has signal.Here’s some other apps that might come in handy in this situation.

  • Understand the laws in your state when it comes to recording an officer. It’s legal in every state to film the police, they might try to tell you it’s not but it is. However, there are some state with restrictions related to the recording of audio. Some states require two-party consent, and some states aren’t explicitly clear on this so if you are in one of these states or the legislation isn’t clear in your state inform the other parties present that you are recording. 

3. Now what do you do with this documentation? Collect yourself, calm down and then organize your case. When you’re still in a state of shock you might miss crucial information or sound confusing. Use all your documents and notes and thoughts to organize a refined summary of events. If you are taking this to a lawyer they want to see that you can sell this case. By the time you give these notes to a lawyer, your information should include a chronological story or what happened, what you saw, and any potential witnesses. Answer those who, what, when, where, why questions. 

Now, don’t just go to any lawyer. They are already hesitant to pick up cases regarding police violence so be prepared for some rejection. Also, try not to find a lawyer that works with cops or does cases for them - find ones in your state that specialize in handling police misconduct. This will require some questions and research. Here’s a small list of some to help you out, but there are many more out there. Even if you weren’t arrested by the police but experienced abuse, it’s recommended that you report the cop(s). 

4. Another option is to file police complaints. Internal police divisions will RARELY find that their officers did anything wrong but there are other ways you can file complaints. After criminal charges and civil actions have been resolved you can start filing police misconduct reports, if you weren’t charged of a crime and you’re not suing then you can file ASAP. Your area will usually have a citizen review board, an office within your local police department that accepts them, or you can find what your options are by Googling “police complaint [name of town/city].“ 

Look at what the various options are and send the complaint to all of the ones you find within your area. Make sure to see what you have to do when filing a complaint, you might need to fill out certain forms or send over the information you have. Pay attention to what’s needed so your complaint isn’t outright rejected. Note, some areas might require you obtain some forms through the police department. Avoid discussing your case and who is involved at all costs, they might try to convince you that your case has no merit, they might intimidate you, and they might warn the officers involved. 

5. You probably won’t get a quick response from the police department or civilian monitoring agency but it DOES create an official record of the incident and it could become relevant in future cases against the same officer. You can also send the complaints and documentation to your local ACLU and other civil rights groups in your area. Some might even deal exclusively with police abuse.

6. Go public. Note, if you have an attorney, this might not be recommended so talk to them about it but if you’ve filed your complaints or don’t want to do that you can just bring the incident to light. There are websites that take your stories, photos, videos, etc. like Cop Block. Cop Block also has local organizations and they might have websites that direct you how to file complaints specifically in your area. (Here’s the list)

Gift for Harry

So, I taught my 5yo son how to make pot holders this week. When I asked him which colors we should us, he said rainbow.

Once it was done, he decided he wanted to give it to Harry who is his favorite singer. Now, I don’t exactly have Harry on speed dial, so I chuckled and asked him how we would get the pot holder to him. He shrugged and said, “You should ask your friends.”

So I did, and having the most amazing friends ever, @phd-mama and @littlebabyruth stepped up like the heroes they are. They are going to be at the Boston concert this weekend and have offered to take Ian’s gift and try to throw it on stage.

So Ian wrote a note to attach to the finished potholder.

I helped with some of the writing because that’s a lot of words for a kindergartner, but the message was all him.

So I wanted to let the world know what awesome people my friends are and to say publicly how much I appreciate them helping a 5 yo they’ve never met get his art project to his hero. Also, anyone who wants to signal boost this so maybe someone from Harry’s team will see it, thank you in advance,

My crazy wish is that the pot holders get to Harry and there is video of him reading Ian’s note. I asked Ian what he would do if this happened, and he said, “I would probabwy scweam and fall on the floor.” If he does, I’ll post the pics. 😉

4

january 30th, 2017 | some notes about vectors that i made yesterday! i took the test today and it wasn’t as difficult as i thought it’d be, hehehehe. but that doens’t mean i’m going to get a good grade, because i’m probably going to score a 5/10 or less HAHAHAHA. but let’s hope i pass at least!

studygram | my other posts | tracking #hellohana!

I’m now entering my third semester of my second year college, and I think I’ve gathered enough experience in college to give relevant tips to incoming freshmen or just regular old college students. I’m not an expert in getting all As, not getting those 4.0s in every subject, but I have maintained my place as a Dean’s Lister since my first sem freshmen year, so I think I do have an idea on what I’m talking about. Feel free to take my advice! (or not).

homework/projects
1. seriously, once you get information on your homework/project, start them immediately. DO NOT wait till last minute to complete them because you will regret it. Do them as soon as the professor assigns it to you so you won’t spend the next few weeks stressing out on the amount of homework you have.

2. start creative projects first. unless you can pull creativity out of your hat whenever you need it, I highly suggest you start creative projects as soon as  you get them because trust me when I say you do not want to be decorating/designing shit when the due date is tomorrow.

3. do your best in every assignment; trust me, the points will count at the end of the semester.

4. do extra credit work and treat it as priority work; excess points are cushion points. 

5. group projects suck but here’s a good rule to keep in mind: if you’re the leader, delegate those tasks (read up on division of labor). if you’re a group member, do the delegated task as best as you can. know your goal as a group; are you guys in it to get to know each other and build rapport? then the output won’t matter as much and focus on helping and getting to know each other. Is the output the most important part? Then be real with each other; if you can’t do this task, then don’t do it & instead give it to someone else. Some may not even get any work at all, because what matters is the output. 


friends/other people/professors
1.  keep your circle small. your friends are there to guide you, support you and tell you when you’re wrong. find the crowd you vibe with the most because trust me, the right friends are medicine to all college problems

2. those who mind don’t matter and those who matter don’t mind. keep that in mind, my dear.

3. love the professor? do your best in their class. hate the professor? do your best in their class. it doesn’t matter whether you hate the prof or not; they still hold your grade at the end of the semester. if you really can’t stand them, just think of it as training your ability to be humble (and not punch someone).

4. talk to your professors. they’re not as bad as you think they are.

5. seriously, go to their consultation hours when you think you’re failing. 


class/notes
1. TAKE NOTES. cannot emphasize this enough. don’t rely on anyone to take your notes for you; it’s your education, it’s time you take responsibility for it.

2. sit in front of class if you believe you’ll get distracted if you sit in the back. 

3. talk to your seatmate! you’ll need them when you get sick and can’t come to class.

4. again, TAKE NOTES. don’t photograph the slide. write that shit down, or type it if you don’t want to write. bottom line, don’t picture it. 

5. revise, revise, revise. if you want to understand the material, a good way to go about it is to revise your notes in a way YOU can understand.


having fun/relationships
1. have fun! i was too stressed when I was a freshman all because I focused too much on getting 4.0s. It’s possible to get 4.0s and still have fun! having fun doesn’t need to be about drinking (although if it is, then stay safe doing it!) it could be reading a book or hanging out with your friends, whatever works for you and keeps your mind off school for awhile.

2. it’s okay to have crushes! they could be your inspiration (but don’t let them be your distraction)

3. talk to that cute guy you’ve been classmates with ever since February who you can’t stop looking at. you’ve got nothing to lose.

4. relationships are a good source of support, love and care but pls don’t forget your friends.

5. learn how to have fun, and college will be easier. 

Reminder: having fun does not equal to slacking off.

I guess that’s it! If you guys want more tips/advice/academic or college realted, I can write more or you can just hit up my ask! 

I don’t often do this, but I did a repaint of the Rumpelstiltskin I painted back in December–I sort of underestimated the power of the Rumple fandom and was not expecting the original to get quite so many reblogs, and every time I saw a notification pop up in my feed I just felt like youknow, maybe I should fix his noodle hands and give him some eyebrows? I felt a little guilty about leaving you such a noodle boy.

So I did–unfortunately I can’t reblog and change the original photo at the same time, so I’ll leave the other one in it’s separate post. That picture has a slightly different vibe anyway.

2

August 19 2017

Ok I planned on getting to just chapter 12 before college starts again (barely finished chapter 5 yESTERDAY and I’ll be moving back to UCLA in just about a month LOL). I really had no motivation for anything school related this summer but I guess it was a good break?? 

Going to start chapter six right now (LOOOL). When should I start packing hmm

Ellee

250617 ; what i bring when i go out to study 

1. chargers (for all my electronic devices) 
this is so important for me, especially if i’m going to be studying for eight hours straight. i hate the frustration i feel when my devices (laptop!!!!) run out of battery because this totally throws me off my plans for the day, plus it’s always better to be safe than sorry!!

2. headphones / earphones 
these are absolutely essential while studying at a cafe (like starbucks, which i frequent). you never know, there could be screaming babies or loud conversations which none of us want to be listening to (it screws up your concentration) so listening to music helps 

3. oversized sweater of some sort
i love love love the feeling of warmth in a really cold place, and most places i go to study are cold anyway (starbucks, the library). you don’t want to be shivering while studying, you’d more likely be thinking of ways to get warmer instead of actually study, plus oversized sweaters are more comfy, so yes.

4. water bottle
this is pretty self-explanatory, i mean keeping hydrated detoxifies your body and keeps you healthy!!!!! h20 is important friends!!!!!! also bring some healthy snacks like berries or granola (my favourite study snacks) if you’re going to be studying for a long time.

5. notebook
or some loose leaf paper, depending on what i want to write my notes on. 

6. pencil case
i usually take with me at least two black pens (in case i drop one or one runs out of ink or some other mishap), a mechanical pencil, an eraser, markers / highlighters in whatever colour scheme my notes are going to be, a ruler, a black brush pen (usually the pentel fude sign pen), correction tape and occasionally, brush markers (i rarely bring these though, since i don’t really incorporate them in my notes) + any other materials i might need (eg. calculator for math etc)

7. laptop (or textbook)
this depends on where the notes to make my notes come from (did this make sense?). usually i bring both, since my teachers send slides, and the textbook is the main resource i use. 

8. bullet journal
i pretty much bring my bullet journal everywhere, so studying outside is not an exception. it’s nice to strike off things on my to-do list when i’m studying, and it makes the whole process a lot more bearable, since doing that makes me feel productive, and being productive makes me feel motivated (also if i need a break i like to work on my spreads with whatever materials i have!!!).

these are the main things i bring when i go out to study, sometimes i bring more, and sometimes less, it depends on what i want to do, but what’s pictured above is the most common! 

#juststudyblrthings
  • going through reblogs of ur posts and reading all the tags to see if anyone complimented your handwriting 
  • “no no procrastinating is okay see this is different this is studyblr so it’s educational therefore it’s all good that I spent 5 hours on tumblr and now I’m not going to finish my final essay" 
  • zooming in on photos to read people’s notes 
  • quietly googling terms used in other education systems (gymnasium? revisions?) 
  • wanting to get a white desk/sheets just so you can take artsy pictures 
  • let me just stand in the middle of the moleskine store and take 500 pictures 
  • WHAT IS THAT APP 
  • realizing that almost everyone in the community is a ravenclaw (GO EAGLES !!) 
  • *feels like a regular Sherlock Holmes after painstakingly figuring out what brand pen that is* *sees price* *cries internally* 
  • *is aggressively artistically challenged* *teaches self to draw banners anyway* 
  • at the end of the day, feeling v loved and supported and accepted (where you may never have been before) in this oddball community of fellow dorks and motivated students *cheesy music, fades to black*
Overrated First Year Advice

Disclaimer: I don’t mean to discredit the posts that have these suggestions in them… However, I know that for people going into first year university, it can be stressful seeing pages and pages of “must-dos” and feeling like you have to do them all. As always, different things work for different people! 

Talking to Profs 

  1. Getting to know profs personally. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to profs personally, don’t feel like you have to. In upper years, it can be really valuable to know profs for recommendations, etc. but in first year this is less important. Profs also don’t usually mark your work in first year, so you don’t need to suck up to them for good grades. 
  2. Going to office hours every week. Going to office hours can be very valuable if you have questions about the course or an assignments. However, I see a lot of posts telling students to go every week even if they don’t have a question. You don’t need to do this unless you want to! Often times, profs will even request that you talk to your TA before them.
  3. Emailing the prof if you miss class. Unless you go to a very small school, the prof is not going to notice if you miss class. You don’t need to email them telling them why you were absent, you can just go to a different section of the lecture or get the notes from someone. (If you have labs/tutorials/seminars, the same does not apply!! Email your TA.) 

Studying and Grades

  1. Starting to study for tests six weeks in advance. This is one piece of advice that always baffles me. The semester is only 12 weeks long (usually), so if you have a quiz in week 6, you can’t start studying for it much before week 4 or 5. Also, there is no way you will retain the finer details of things if you learned them 6 weeks before writing the test. 
  2. Guaranteeing a 4.0. I see a ton of posts telling students how to guarantee a 4.0 average or straight As. But honestly, as much as you do all of the readings and go to lectures and follow all of the studyblr advice out there, you can still get a TA who won’t give any mark higher than an 80. Just try your best and know that even though getting high marks is great, it is not the only indicator of success in uni. 
  3. Sitting in the front of the class. This is not a necessity. A lot of people post that if the prof can see your face and remember you, you will get better grades. However, in first year, the prof doesn’t mark your papers usually and even if they did, your paper doesn’t have a photo of you on it. Also, they teach so many classes I doubt they just naturally remember the first three rows of each one and no one else. Just sit where you are comfortable and can pay attention and see, and you will do fine. 
  4. Choosing your major in high school or based on what job you think you will get. If you think you want to major in something and then it turns out you hate it, that is fine! Your major should be a subject you are passionate about and can get good grades in, not something that you chose in high school or will “guarantee” you a good job (although, its also okay if your major is all of the above). 
  5. Taking full notes on a topic before the lecture. If you are going to the lecture with a ton of info already, it is easier to get distracted or to feel like you don’t need the lectures at all. Instead, take notes in the lecture and then supplement them with notes from readings or bonus material rather than the opposite way. 

Textbooks

  1. Buying textbooks online. I definitely think that buying textbooks online can be a good idea, but sometimes it is just easier to buy them from the bookstore. For example, if you are not sure if a site is legit/the book will come in time/its the right edition, etc. it might just be safer to get it in person or buy it used on campus from an upper year. (Remember, you can probably sell it next year!) 
  2. Buying old editions of textbooks. If you have the two books side by side and can tell that they are very similar, go for it. But often times, two different editions are totally different and can just mess you up. Science and math books often have different practice questions, and even in social sciences and humanities, the content can change drastically in one edition. 

Lifestyle/Personal

  1. Buying extra storage and furnishing for your dorm. Make sure you do a virtual room tour or talk to someone about the layout before you buy a ton of storage. Most dorm rooms that I have been in have a ton of storage (mine has a closet, a huge desk, shelves to the ceiling, a dresser, and cabinets for extra storage). You don’t want to show up with way too much stuff. 
  2. Keeping 1000 things in your backpack. If you live on campus, you don’t actually need to carry every single thing on earth in your bag. It will get annoying carrying around a heavy backpack while walking. Unless you are going to the library for a huge study sesh or can’t make it back to your room all day, pack lightly! 
  3. Avoiding wearing “freshman clothes”. No one cares what you are wearing. People often wear pajamas or just track pants and a baggy t-shirt to class or the caf. If you like dressing up, that’s great! But don’t feel like certain clothes are off limits. 
  4. Living at home meaning you aren’t independent. Posts that look down upon living at home or going to your home university are garbage posts in my opinion. Being able to live away from home is a privilege, and many people are not financially, physically, or emotionally able to do that. If you are living at home, do not feel bad about it. You are still an adult and you are still independent. 

Hope this helps reduce some rising freshman anxiety! And remember, if you do want to follow any of the original tips, that is okay too. :)