this is for you galen

2

The blasterfire outside had stopped. The silence was almost peaceful. Hands trembling, Bodhi straightened behind the console and glanced from the boarding ramp to the cockpit ladder. He thought of his plan to take off, to fly through the gauntlet of TIEs to rescue Jyn and Cassian from the communications tower. He thought of the strain he’d heard in Cassian’s voice, and of his last signal to Melshi-the one that had gone unanswered. If he didn’t have the chance… he’d done enough. It was okay.

“This is for you, Galen,” he said, and started for the ladder.

Bodhi Rook heard the ring of metal once, twice, in the cabin, and then the soft clatter of something rolling across the deck. He turned in time to glimpse the detonator. He heard nothing as the cabin flared impossibly bright.

Like a pilot should, he died with his ship.

–Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, novelization written by Alexander Freed

i am absolutely convinced that bodhi rook is the equivalent of snow white or cinderella. like ,, you wanna talk to bodhi alone? too bad. you talk to bodhi, the three birds on his shoulders, the jedhan equivalent of a deer he named after galen, and other little critters scurrying around his feet. you want some peace and quiet? better not be near bodhi. he has a chorus of birds singing to him. cassian is utterly confused by it all and is 99% sure the deer hates him. jyn has fought the vast majority of the birds. chirrut gets along impeccably with all the animals, but they peck baze to death. it truly is all a wonderful sight

Soo… I saw Rogue One again last night on IMAX. Some random thoughts:


In the bunker while little Jyn waits for someone to get her, in the low glow of the lantern light, you can see her silent tears rolling down her face. At eight, she learned how to cry silently. I imagine that, until she saw her father’s holo on Jedha, from eight until twenty-two, it was the only way she ever cried if she cried at all: alone and without a sound.

I’ve been pronouncing Chirrut’s name wrong for months now. I’ve seen this movie twice before. His name is not a text post. What the hell is wrong with me?

You can see how much Jyn and Saw cared for each other when they reunite on Jedha. There’s a lot of hurt, but also a lot of love that never went away.

The looks on Baze and Bodhi’s faces when they see NiJedha destroyed breaks my heart. You see it pass through their eyes: their home is gone, everyone they ever knew is now dead; incinerated.

I got chills every time Cassian shouted “JYN!” because this guy has no chill and I love it.

Jyn lashes out at Cassian after Eadu because he has lied to her and had intended to kill her father, but it strikes me that the hurt is amplified because up until then, she has trusted him more than she has trusted anyone else in almost a decade. And like in the novel, she doesn’t just feel like he lied to her–many people have lied to her–she feels betrayed because he mattered, and he’s shown that she matters to him somehow, too.

The first time I watched it, I was totally in the uncanny valley with Tarkin. Less so the second time, and this third time, I was like oh yeah, that’s cool, that looks fine.

TARKIN IS TALL. I never noticed this before, but he’s a giant. After we got home from the movie, we put on A New Hope and yep, Tarkin was always super tall, but he looked average sized because he was always standing next to Darth Vader who is a giant.

The lack of personal space, oh my gawd. I mean I noticed it the last two viewings and obviously during all the times I stared moonily into the various gifsets, but seeing it on IMAX, like whoa. They’re six inches away from each other practically every time they speak. One stumble and they’re making out. WHY DID THEY NOT STUMBLE EVER? STUPID SURE-FOOTED REBELS.

Ben Medelsohn nails the look of terror when Krennic meets Vader. By all accounts from the Rogue One press tour, he was legit terrified when he shot those scenes, and it shows, and it’s perfect.

Felicity Jones is fucking amazing in this part and I’m literally the fight me emoji (ง'̀-‘́)ง to all the haters because if all you want is obvious scenery-chewing to represent deep emotion, then get out of my face you clowns.

By the time we get to “welcome home,” Jyn and Cassian are so into each other, like, I cannot even.

Oh, Bodhi. You were key to all of this. Your bravery was the first domino to fall. Without you, none of this would have happened. And then, taking charge on Rogue One. Giving orders. What a change from the shell-shocked, post-Bor Gullet Bodhi on Jedha. Galen would have been proud of you, too.

When Baze smiles my heart melts a little bit and then I die inside because he’ll be dead soon, too.

“Your Father Would Be Proud” kicks in as soon as Cassian saves Jyn from Krennic on the tower, and I was barely holding my shit together right then and there.

THE LOOKS IN THE TURBOLIFT LIKE WTF CAN I JUST FREEZE TIME AND LIVE IN THAT MOMENT FOREVER? OK. THANKS. I THINK I’M PREGNANT NOW?

Jyn and Cassian walking to the beach is like peak handsomeness and beauty. Goddamit, Diego and Felicity. And goddamit, Gareth Edwards, you done good.

THE HUG ON THE BEACH IN IMAX PLZ SEND HELP.

Every single one of them died knowing that they had completed their piece of the mission. Bodhi patched through to the Alliance. Baze and Chirrut turned on the master switch. Kaytoo helped Jyn and Cassian get the data file. Jyn and Cassian successfully transmitted the plans. But none of them never knew for sure if the Alliance got the plans. They’d never know that the Death Star would be destroyed. They’d never know that they were all parts in the sum of the whole. But they all died knowing they gave it everything they had to give.

2

     Bodhi staggered to a halt and clapped his knees, hung his head panting for what he knew was too long.“No,” he managed at last. “No, listen. I need you to trust me, all right? You need to follow my lead and not say anything unless someone asks you to.”
     Rain bounced off the droid’s chest plate. K-2SO looked at Bodhi appraisingly. “Trust is a matter of degree,” he said. “I really don’t know you, Bodhi Rook.”
     Bodhi cringed and shook his head. There’s no time! The others were waiting. Galen Erso was waiting. He wanted to shout. Instead he talked.
     “You do know me,” he said. “Look—you, me.” He jabbed his finger at the Imperial emblem on the droid’s arm, then at the identical symbol on his flight suit. “We’ve both got them, and we’re both here anyway. We both want to stop the Death Star, right? Both want to help the Rebellion?”
    The droid didn’t answer. Bodhi was talking too fast now, but if anyone could understand him it would be a machine. “Cassian reprogrammed you, right? Maybe? You’re loyal to him, I get that. Galen Erso reprogrammed me. We can still get this mission right, and we want the same thing, but you have to let me lead the way…”
     Something exploded on the canyon ridge. The light made K-2SO look wraithlike—a gaunt shadow with deathly bright eyes.
     “All right, then,” K-2SO said.
     Bodhi nodded briskly, raggedly, and turned to face the shuttle port.
     —Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, chapter 12.

skymurdock  asked:

psst! thoughts on Lyra Erso, especially what you think might've happened if she had somehow survived? does she get to meet Beru and Breha, do they form a little club of middle-aged women in the Rebellion?

The crystal was…interesting. 

Breha had wandered over to the cluttered table out of vague interest—amid the looming structures and finicky-looking equipment, the table was the only thing she trusted herself not to damage. It was a chaotic mess, tools and rock samples and notes scrawled on flimsi all scattered, stacked haphazardly. But Breha’s gaze had been drawn to the innocuous white crystal immediately. She couldn’t help picking it up, turning it over in her hand. Someone had drilled a hole through one end, and threaded a cord through it, as though it was meant to be worn as a pendant.

It felt oddly warm against her skin, like something living.

Breha thought of Leia inexplicably, and for a moment she panicked—but Leia was fine, stuck in yet another strategy meeting. She would be there in the mess for dinner, probably arguing with Captain Solo, or trying to bite back a grin as Luke teased Lieutenant Antilles. Leia was fine. She was—

Breha startled at the sound of a loud grunt, too-close behind her. When she whirled around there was a helmeted sentient sticking out of what had previously been a gaping hole in the ground. The faint sound of hammering, voices, could still be heard drifting up from depths unknown.

“Oh!” the human woman—at least, Breha was reasonably sure; it was hard to tell under the layer of grime—said. She hauled herself up and out of the hole, stumbled to her feet. “I’m sorry, I didn’t realize anyone was here. Have you been waiting long?”

“Only a moment or so,” Breha demurred. Now that she could see all of her, the sentient was definitely a human woman, dressed in something that may have, at one time, been a Rebel uniform. (It was encrusted with entirely too much dirt to be called that anymore.) She had repurposed a blaster bandolier, and stuck it full of what looked like laserscopes and spectrographs. 

There was a pickax at her hip.

Breha cleared her throat, tried again. “I was told Lyra Erso—”

“You must be with Acquisitions! They said someone would be coming by for the wishlist.”

“It’s not a wishlist,” Breha said, but she couldn’t summon her usual fierceness, the accompanying lecture about the importance of resource planning. 

So this was Lyra Erso.

Your husband killed my husband, Breha thought dizzily. She’d forgotten how to breathe, what came after exhale.

“Yes, yes,” Lyra Erso said, waving a hand dismissively. She had come to stand beside Breha, and was sifting through the cluttered mess of the desk with purpose. “I swear on the Force, the Rebellion has become almost as bad as the Order was when it comes to paperwork…”

Breha blinked. “The Order?”

Lyra Erso froze, a sheaf of flimsi in her hand. Breha watched a complicated expression flicker across her face, and then slide away. “Oh. That’s—I mean the Jedi Order,” she finally said, stiltedly. “I was…a youngling. At the temple on Coruscant. In another life.”

Now that Breha was looking, she could see that the lines around Lyra Erso’s mouth, her eyes, were not cracks in the dirt—she had to be just older than Breha, and that was a strange thought, that Galen Erso’s widow was the same age as Bail Organa’s.

“AgriCorps?” Breha hazarded. She wasn’t sure if there was a politer way to say, so you never made it to padawan.

“Engineering division. Mining geology and geoengineering, mainly.” Lyra Erso straightened up, and looked Breha in the eye. “You?”

“I was not in the AgriCorps,” Breha retorted dryly. Lyra Erso pulled a face, and Breha found herself adding, “But I knew many Jedi.”

“Ah. From Coruscant, then?”

“Alderaan,” Breha said, and Lyra Erso jerked, stumbling a few steps back, away from Breha. All the blood had drained from her face, and Breha watched her throat work as she swallowed.

“Oh.”

“My husband was a senator on Coruscant for many years, though, and counted some of the High Councilors his friends.”

“I know,” Lyra said weakly. She looked as though she wasn’t breathing. “I—heard stories of Senator Organa. Though more from…My husband was a engineer. He worked on military contracts, so he—”

“I am aware,” Breha said, and she wasn’t able to keep the ice and fury out of her voice this time, not entirely. Lyra flinched.

Keep reading

Do you Wanna Build a Death Star?

Galen?
Do you wanna build a Death Star?
Come on let’s start today!
 We never make things anymore, not since the war,
It’s like you’ve gone away…
We used to be best buddies
And now we’re not
I wish you would tell me why!
Do you want to build a Death Star?
It doesn’t have to be a Death Star
Go away
Okay, bye…

Do you want to build a Death Star?
Don’t you know production stalls
I think some company is overdue
I’ve started pacing through this weapon’s endless halls (This is my achievement!)
It gets a little lonely
All these empty rooms
Just watching the hours tick by
(Tic-Tock, Tic-Tock, Tic-Tock, Tic-Tock, Tic-Tock)

Galen? 

Please, I know you’re grieving
People are asking where you’ve been
They say “work harder,” and I’m trying to
I did this all for you, just let me in
I killed your girl and her mother
It’s just you and me
What are we gonna do? 

Do you want to build a Death Star?…

You finally received an action figure for Rogue One’s Galen Erso — what was that like? Were your kids excited?
It was very cool. I haven’t actually seen it yet, but they have texted me that it’s on its way in the mail. Because I have made a big thing out of not getting one. I was actually moaning quite a lot. I was moaning my way to get one, and finally I achieved it, so I’m at peace with that.

Well, if you’re going to be in a Star Wars movie, you have to get your own action figure.
I invented the Death Star — I mean, c’mon guys! [Laughs] -Mads Mikkelsen

anonymous asked:

Do you think Bodhi Rook is religious?? I can't make up my mind.

The Empire is a prideful god. It will permit no higher authority than itself, no greater power than its armies, no eternity but its reign. (Those who might suggest otherwise are heretics, and are dealt with as idolaters must.) A militant kind of monotheism; there are no gods, there is no Force, there is just the Empire. There is only the Empire.

Bodhi had an aunt who—well, he was never entirely clear what, except that mother and father had stopped talking about her the same time the holo of the Emperor went up over the mantle. (His mother had cried in her room for weeks, and when Bodhi thinks of it he still tastes the charcoal of burnt rice, the awful tension of whispered arguments happening in other rooms.) But it had something to do with the clear, bright crystals she had sent them, because Bodhi’s father had gone room by room and scooped them up, shoved them in a box. Buried it under the floorboards.

No one was allowed to play Jedi and Separatists anymore. At least not where an adult would see, would go grey and gather all of them together in a tight circle, to say in a quiet voice, you can’t, don’t, stop.

(There are no Jedi anymore. There were never any Jedi. The Jedi never existed. How does the old adage go? The power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them—)

Shykeli was thrown out of flight academy for meditating in secret. The administration had found ‘Jedi propaganda’ in her things, though they’d never really explained what that was, or what it meant. If the Force isn’t real, Cregha had said thoughtfully, why are they so scared of people venerating it?

Cregha was reassigned to skiffs soon after. Bodhi missed xir.

But after Galen gives him the message, Galen cups Bodhi’s face, tucks Bodhi’s hair behind his ears. Galen says, May the Force be with you.

“My auntie had—she gave us crystals like that,” Bodhi blurts out in Jyn’s vague direction, because he’s had may the force may the force looping through his head for a standard week; he can’t figure out why it won’t stop.

Jyn glances at him sidelong, still playing with the bright, clear crystal on the cord around her neck. It catches artificial light like something not artificial at all, more real than anything Bodhi has seen. 

“It’s a kyber crystal,” Chirrut says into the awkward silence. “A conduit of the Force. Your aunt must have been a believer.”

“My father hid them,” Bodhi says absently. (may the force may the force…) “He didn’t want us attracting attention.”

“Smart man,” Baze offers, and then they are all silent again, waiting for Cassian to return.


(This is what Bodhi Rook thinks of in his last moments: of crystals, and the Force invisible but omnipresent; of being smart versus being good, and sending a message out into space, not knowing if anyone is listening.

His last words are for Galen. His last thoughts are for the aunt he did not know. If perhaps—)