this is another great scene

shiro, after holding allura’s hand: yeah, i held her hand. i was pretty smooth if i say so myself

keith: shut up before i kick you

shiro: you’re just jealous because you haven’t held lance’s hand. oh wait -

keith: don’t you dare say it!

shiro: he doesn’t remember 

keith: you’re dead to me shirogane

7

Greenway, Agatha Christie’s house in Devon, England

Featured in Agatha Christie’s Poirot 13x03: “Dead Man’s Folly”

“So, in some strange twist of fate for Poirot and for me, we were to shoot the final sequences of ‘Dead Man’s Folly’ [the last episode they filmed] at Greenway itself in the last days of June 2013, sending Hercule Poirot to Dame Agatha’s own home. It would be the first time that the fictional character of Poirot arrived at the home of his creator.”
- David Suchet, Poirot and Me

10

TRAIN TO BUSAN

“Is Bruce in here?” Tim figured he might be— Bruce spent a lot of time in the children’s wing of Wayne Enterprises. There were a dozen or so kids in daycare most weekdays, and Bruce liked to hang out.

Tim liked to hang out too. They had nice snacks, and he’d known most of the kids since they were toddlers. And sometimes naps were mandatory.

“Conference call,” Damian told him. (For someone who claimed to hate naps, snackfood, kids, and humanity in general, Damian also spent a lot of time in the children’s wing.) “I don’t know where.” 

He went back to what he was doing, which was arranging a set of pewter soldiers into a complex model of a battlefield, presumably for the benefit of the preschooler sitting next to him. 

“What’s this?”

“The Battle of Issus, 333 BC.”

“Right, obviously.” Tim decided he was curious, so he settled down on the mats to watch.  Damian finished his model; he pulled a marker from the art table and used it as a pointer. 

“Okay. This is the Macedonian army, outnumbered but in the better tactical position, south of the Pinarus River. Their leader is Alexander the Great. And this—” He pointed to his enemy line. “—is the Achaemenid Empire. They’re about to lose.”

Damian tapped his marker on the Macedonian right. “This is the companion calvary, Alexander’s elite force, and they—” he cut off when he noticed his pupil digging in the toy bin, clearly distracted. The kid came up with a battered Transformer, which he set behind Damian’s lines. 

“Elliot. Alexander did not have robots.”

“But,” said Tim, rummaging through the box himself, “did he have wizards?” He pulled a bearded magician out of the tub and held it up for Damian to see. 

“You know he didn’t.”

Tim passed the wizard to Elliot. “But what if he did?”

“Drake.”

“How would that go?”

Drake.”

“Abracadabra, Alexander!” Elliot yelled, gleefully smashing through Damian’s entire left flank.

“Damn it, Drake.” Damian sighed in frustration— not quite the rise Tim was hoping for, but still something. He dropped Elliot’s discarded robot back into the box.

“I don’t know what you were expecting,” Tim told him. “Elliot’s four. He’s too young for— what is this— military history?”

“He was doing fine before you showed up.” Damian started to re-erect his soldiers, but he gave it up after Elliot came in for a second pass. “Which is typical, isn’t it?”

“Good one.”

“Thank you.” Damian crossed his arms. “Fine. I’ll bite. When is he supposed to learn this kind of thing?”

“High school? Maybe never.”

“That can’t be right.”

“Have I ever lied to you?”

“Frequently.” Damian rolled his eyes. “I’m getting a second opinion.”

“I’ll wait.”

Damian checked the room for potential allies. “Thomas?” he called over his shoulder, “You learned military strategy as a kid, right?”

Duke looked up from the book he was reading to a pair of kindergardeners. “Just you, man.”

“Told you.” Tim fished a bag of plastic ninja from the toy box and arranged them pointedly into a row. “How are you still surprised by this kind of thing?”

Damian glared at him. “Okay, first of all? I’m not a— hold on a second. Elliot!”

Elliot froze with a large, plastic dinosaur held aloft over the battlefield. He drew it sheepishly back to his chest. “Sorry.”

“Not in the calvary wing,” Damian told him. “You’ll scare the horses.”

“Here?” Elliot pointed to the front of the phalanx.

“Yes.”

“RAWR.”

“Aim for his center.” Damian turned back to Tim. “Anyway. Why are you still talking to me? I thought we had an agreement about unnecessary contact.”

Keep reading

10
The things that I know about "Supergirl" without actually watching it.

*Maggie Sawyer invented dimples and heart eyes
*Sanvers aka ship of dreams (1000x better thank clexa)
*Bad lighting in sanvers scenes
*Mon-Ew
*another wave of the great lesbian migration
*Everyone misses Cat (that was her name? Idk)
*Lena can’t be straight
*Lena and Kara have more chemistry than Kara and Mon-Ew
*Kara had better storyline in season 1
*Some guy thought that Kara was gay
*Just buying each other flowers - yeah gal pals
*Alex’s coming out story is really important and it had a strong impact on many people
*Kara Danvers and potstickers
*Danvers Sisters bond is pure and important
*Kara is #1 sanvers shipper
*There’s this guy who seems cute and nice and he doesnt have any powers (idk if im right)
*“Sanvers centric episode” was not “sanvers centric episode” and sanvers shippers are mad because they were fooled again
*Nobody wants Mon-Ew to babysit Kara because she can take care of herself

*+ the glasses don’t help (really)

10

Malec Appreciation Week Day 3 - Favorite Malec Moment

I can’t help but love you
Even though I try not to
I can’t help but want you
I know that I’d die without you

6

If Ben & Sophie did a romantic movie together

8

I get it. Your dad was the only person you loved. Your just trying to make up for it. No, I didn’t. I can never make up for it. But this is a start. Is that why you named me Henry? To try to make things better?

8

The Last Will and Testament of the Time Lord known as the Doctor, to be delivered, according to ancient tradition, to his closest friend, on the eve of his final day.

me: rwbyac is over i don’t have to do daily art any more!
also me: ……………….. but maybe just a quick pic (this wasn’t quick)

GREAT WEISS SHARK! I’m falling more and more in love with Faunus!Weiss every passing second tbh

bounding-heart  asked:

Hi. I reblogged your post about the Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and then got an anon asking me to elaborate on the thematic complexity of the film. Given it was your post, I was wondering if you'd write a bit more on the subject? I'd love to hear your thoughts. :)

Hello! 

I’m honored that you reached out to me about this movie; it’s one of my favorite films of all time, and I could write novels about it if I could.

Now, consider this: it’s 2004 and we’re seeing Prisoner of Azkaban for the first time. We as an audience have just gone through two films that mapped out the typical hero’s journey; Voldemort’s the antagonist, and Harry’s the hero that vanquishes him. Black-and-white narratives, clear borders to who’s noble and who’s evil. However, in PoA, we realize that these borders are actually very ambiguous, and Alfonso Cuarón exploits this concept quite beautifully in this film. 

Take the title card. 

Have you noticed what’s different from its predecessors? 

The logo’s no longer golden. 

It’s silver and gray, displaying both lightness and darkness in every letter. In fact, the very location where the logo floats around emulates light in a dark environment. Out of context, we can’t figure out where it even is, whereas in the previous films, we clearly see the logo floating around in the skies. This tactic foreshadows that there’s going to be a sense of ambiguity in PoA over what is good and what is evil, instead of giving us a clear cut story of the noble hero getting introduced to a magical and mysterious world [the golden logo with a stormy background in Philosopher’s Stone] or the valiant hero defeating the malignant villain [the sun shooting through the dark clouds in Chamber of Secrets]. Some examples of moral ambiguity in PoA include Sirius Black, who gets sent to Azkaban for a crime he didn’t commit; Remus Lupin, an inherently good person, but labeled as evil by society in the end since he’s a werewolf; Pettigrew, an individual that turned to the dark side out of cowardice and fear, instead of devotion to Voldemort. 

PoA’s title card can also be taken more literally; since this is the transition film that’s going to set up much more heavier tones in the future, we’re going to be exposed to a lot more dark elements of the magical world in this movie. 

Here’s a scene where Cuarón again emphasizes lightness and darkness, but with different thematic meanings. 

We see a snowy Hogwarts, where everything is light until…

…the camera focuses on the clock and Harry behind it, who’s completely enveloped in darkness. 

In contrast, his classmates play and prank each other in the light snow while they get ready to go to Hogsmeade. 

Just from this single scene, Cuarón displays that Harry, surrounded by darkness, will always be separate from the other students at Hogwarts. No one in Hogwarts has dark forces threatening to consume them every waking moment. Everyone’s still able to enjoy the happiness and privileges of childhood innocence, while Harry’s had that innocence snatched away as a baby and grows constantly aware that a dark wizard plans on destroying him. This difference can also be seen without much cinematic analyzation; since Voldemort killed Lily and James, Harry’s had no one to sign the permission slip that allows him to go to Hogsmeade trips (Vernon and Petunia would have never signed it even though Vernon made a deal with Harry; let’s be realistic). 

Now, let’s talk about one of my favorite shots of the film. 

The camera zooms in on the dark Grim residing within the light tea cup, foreshadowing the dark forces that Harry must face. However, I also love this shot because it’s the second time we see the Grim as an evil omen—a red herring for the audience to consume. Cuarón wants his viewers to be afraid of the literal black dog and for them to associate it with evil, which fools non-readers into believing that Sirius Black is who the Grim was foreshadowing, since Sirius can turn into a literal giant black dog. However, once watchers get informed that Sirius is innocent, they finally realize that the evil force wasn’t Sirius after all; it was Pettigrew, who with his escape, finally turns the wheels in motion for Voldemort’s reemergence, and thus puts Harry in grave danger. 

Another great scene that shows many thematic layers? Our first glimpse of the Great Hall. 

The candles and the flames at the sides of the walls give the Great Hall a warm, golden atmosphere. However, we also see the tall windows behind the choir, dark with rain and lightning—a stark contrast to the rest of the Hall, implying that this comforting, light atmosphere of Hogwarts will be short lived. In addition, the choir sings an ominous song to the students, with lyrics lifted straight out of the Three Witches’ dialogue in Shakespeare’s Macbeth (”by the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes”), a famous Elizabethan play that coincidentally also analyzes moral ambiguity. 

With this discordant atmosphere, Cuarón gives us a sense of uneasiness despite the welcome and safe environment of Hogwarts we’ve grown familiar with in the previous two films. The message? There’s a greater form of darkness coming, so strap yourselves in: this ain’t your typical Columbus narrative. And he certainly delivers on this part; other factors besides Voldemort portray the darker areas of the magical world and there’s no happy or satisfactory victory to celebrate at the end of the film. 

I could go on about Prisoner of Azkaban, but I’m afraid that’ll make this post too long for anyone to read! But thank you for the ask; it was so much fun to analyze this film again.  

For more info, Nerdwriter1 has this beautiful video of this film and I think this user has a simply amazing analysis

My Hero Academia Chapter 148

So I’ve been asked by several of my followers if I could review MHA after Fairy Tail. Well here’s my first ever MHA review. Chapter 148 “The sorrows of young Togaice”

Our Chapter opens up on Deku tending to Aizawa, but Aizawa is more focused on getting Lockrock some help. Also we see that Lockrock’s Deadbolt may be wearing off, as the walls start moving again.

We cut to Nighteye vs Twice

Twice send his clone of Rappa at Nighteye, but Nighteye is able to take him down with only getting grazed.

We see that Nighteye uses “Hypermass seals” along with his fighting style. Nighteye basically explains with his prediction he was able to handle Rappa’s speed. This is something I really like. It really shows that even with a non offensive quirk there are ways heroes can help their combat style

Okay, I know Nighteye was All Might’s sidekick, so I expected him to be in good shape, but it doesn’t detract from how badass this scene is. Oh it’s pretty standard shounen, with the shirt busted open and everything, but It’s still so cool seeing Nighteye in a ruined suit and showing off his washboard abs.

Nighteye hits Twice damaging his mask. Which causes him to start breaking apart.

Oh my god… That is so sweet. I mean , yes these are villains, but as you’ll soon see this chapter’s strength really is in humanizing the league of villains.

We see Toga start trying to comfort Twice not only over this Yakuza situation, but also how he feels responsible for taking Overhaul to meet Shigaraki. We then get a flash back.

We see Shigaraki telling Twice and Toga that are now Yakuza. Twice of course is naturally a little peeved.

I’ve got nothing to add… This is just a great scene. We see how much Twice still bears resentment for the Yakuza and how he can’t believe that after what they did Shigaraki is working with them and give him and Toga to Overhaul like pawns. The art of the panel, with all the black and shadows really highlights the emotion felt by Twice.

Again another great scene. We get to see more human aspects of Toga and see what this league means to her. This is just an amazing humanization of villains who are still clearly doing wrong, but we’re able to sympathize with them a lot more.

We then get a scene from Shigaraki. (Wow that smile sure is a lot more pleasant than the one he gave Deku) And he knows that Overhaul really only views them as pawns, but he also knows they are going to be in the way of the League’s goals.

We get a small flash forward

“I believe in you” words you wouldn’t expect from a villain

Well this revitalizes Toga and Twice and they begin to voice their opinions on the Yakuza and their boss, with Irinaka listening. And like all individuals who are subjected to listening to opinins they don’t like, Irinaka acts accordingly

Our chapter ends with Irinaka just saying, ‘fuck it’ and wants them to all kill each other.

Post Chapter followup: My god, this was amazing.

The biggest strength as I said was the humanization of villains this chapter. All these characters like Toga, Twice, and Shigaraki, who’ve all been presented in this villainous light, we now start seeing there is this loyality and love between them all. The stuff with Shigaraki makes a great juxtaposition with Overhaul and how he quite literally sees his men as expendable.

It’s not just the villains, this chapter is able to balance out giving Nighteye a cool spotlight moment. In  fact, this whole chapter is just brilliantly paced.

The twist at the end with Irinaka having enough of this and wants them all to kill each other, is again great.

There really isn’t anything negative I can say.

Final Verdict: 10/10

  • Great character on display
  • Good pacing
  • Good action
  • Closest thing I’ve seen to a perfect chapter