this is a published work

paigem31  asked:

Hi! Do you have an estimated date to when Queen of Air and Darkness will come out?

My publisher hasn’t set a date yet. We’re still working out the definite date for Chain of Gold, and Queen of Air and Darkness comes after that, so I can only say I’ll do my best to get the books to you as quickly as possible (while not sacrificing making them as good as they can be!)

Switching off the brain

Switching off specific brain regions in a laboratory animal is an important type of experiment used to better understand how the brain works. A study published in Nature Methods by Singapore-based researchers identified effective inhibitors of brain activity in the important animal model Drosophila melanogaster, the common vinegar fly. These new tools are enabling researchers to better understand the relationship between neural circuits and behaviour, expanding our knowledge of the brain.

Neurons (brain cells) process information and control behaviour by sending signals to other neurons, hormone-releasing cells and muscles. A fuller understanding of the neuronal control of behaviour would accelerate the development of therapies for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

One of the ways researchers have tried to understand the neuronal control of behaviour is with optogenetics, a technique that uses light-sensitive proteins to control neuronal activity in living tissue. In optogenetics, neurons are genetically modified to express light-sensitive ion channels (proteins that conduct electricity), such that light exposure may be used to activate or inhibit electrical activity.

“There are many useful optogenetic tools to stimulate neural activity but not as many effective inhibitors,” explained Assistant Professor Adam Claridge-Chang, who led the research at Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and A*STAR’s Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB).

Being able to inhibit neural circuits provides researchers the ability to determine the importance of a particular circuit in defining behaviour. In view of that, Asst Prof Claridge-Chang with Dr Farhan Mohammad and other colleagues explored the use of anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from an alga species (Guillardia theta) to inhibit neural activity.

In reading the paper that first described the ACRs, Dr Mohammad realized that ACRs conducted more current compared to other tools. “They are rapidly responsive, require low light intensities for actuation, so they seemed ideal for inhibiting brain activity in fly behaviour experiments,” said Dr Mohammad, a Research Fellow in the Claridge-Chang group.

The group genetically modified flies to express ACRs, and exposed these animals to light of different colours and intensities. In one of the experiments, ACR actuation paralysed climbing flies, causing them to fall abruptly. In another, illumination of ACRs in the animals’ sweet-sensing cells resulted in flies that avoided green light, as though they were avoiding the silencing of a sweet taste. At the cellular level, light actuation of ACRs produced dramatic reductions in electrical activity.

The work done at Duke-NUS and A*STAR’s IMCB indicated that ACRs are highly effective optogenetic tools for the inhibition of behavioural circuits.

“Since they are as powerful as existing methods, but much faster and easier to use, there has been huge interest from the Drosophila research community in adopting these tools,” reported Asst Prof Claridge-Chang, from the Duke-NUS Neuroscience and Behavioural Disorders Programme. “They make testing which circuits are necessary for a particular behaviour as convenient as testing for sufficiency.”

“Understanding any system is greatly aided by being able to remove components from that system and examine the resulting behaviour,” explained Asst Prof Claridge-Chang. “The ACRs are the seventh generation of optogenetic inhibitors, but the first that robustly inhibit Drosophila neuronal activity. Although our study is just newly published, this new technique is already on its way to becoming key tool for behaviour analysis.”

theguardian.com
The great British Brexit robbery: how our democracy was hijacked
A shadowy operation involving big data, billionaire friends of Trump and the disparate forces of the Leave campaign heavily influenced the result of the EU referendum. Is our electoral process still fit for purpose?
By Carole Cadwalladr

Okay.

It took me days to get time together to read this whole thing, but I have finally done it.

This is it. This is the one article you need to read to understand just what is going on in Britain, America, and Russia.

This is the one piece of writing you need and can use to reference the very chilling reality that these countries have been tied together in the machinations  of just a few billionaires, and how Facebook and Google tie in insidiouslyi.

I keep telling y’all to stop fucking with facebook but that’s moot now. It’s so much bigger than this.

“Was that really what you called it, I ask him. Psychological warfare? “Totally. That’s what it is. Psyops. Psychological operations – the same methods the military use to effect mass sentiment change. It’s what they mean by winning ‘hearts and minds’. We were just doing it to win elections in the kind of developing countries that don’t have many rules.”Why would anyone want to intern with a psychological warfare firm, I ask him. And he looks at me like I am mad. “It was like working for MI6. Only it’s MI6 for hire. It was very posh, very English, run by an old Etonian and you got to do some really cool things. Fly all over the world. You were working with the president of Kenya or Ghana or wherever. It’s not like election campaigns in the west. You got to do all sorts of crazy shit.”“

This is not just a story about social psychology and data analytics.

 It has to be understood in terms of a military contractor using military strategies on a civilian population. 

Us. David Miller, a professor of sociology at Bath University and an authority in psyops and propaganda, says it is “an extraordinary scandal that this should be anywhere near a democracy. It should be clear to voters where information is coming from, and if it’s not transparent or open where it’s coming from, it raises the question of whether we are actually living in a democracy or not.”

“And it was Facebook that made it possible. It was from Facebook that Cambridge Analytica obtained its vast dataset in the first place. Earlier, psychologists at Cambridge University harvested Facebook data (legally) for research purposes and published pioneering peer-reviewed work about determining personality traits, political partisanship, sexuality and much more from people’s Facebook “likes”. And SCL/Cambridge Analytica contracted a scientist at the university, Dr Aleksandr Kogan, to harvest new Facebook data. And he did so by paying people to take a personality quiz which also allowed not just their own Facebook profiles to be harvested, but also those of their friends – a process then allowed by the social network.”

Read this. Read the entire thing. It will take you a while and it’s a lot to digest but you need to know.

Signal boost.

@sunderlorn we’re finally completely united in propaganda, isn’t that nice!?

Calling All Witchy Writers.

It’s getting harder and harder to connect with witches who are also writers. It is so, so important for us all to band together and form a helpful community where we can all celebrate each others’ works and give advice.

Doesn’t matter if you’ve been published on Witches & Pagans, posted fanfiction online, or have written in a journal you only keep to yourself. If you’re a witch who writes, I want to hear from you. 

Use #witchywriters to connect to each other on Tumblr and Instagram.

This hashtag is hardly ever used, so we might as well take advantage of that. And of course, reblog this to boost the word.

I want to connect! Make more friends! Read more work! Change the world one witchy writer at a time!! 

2

Ivanka Trump uses Toni Morrison quote to warn women not to be slaves to their work

  • Ivanka Trump’s new book, Women Who Work, was published this week, and at least one passage is a certified disaster of misused metaphor.
  • Referencing a segment from Toni Morrison’s 1987 novel Beloved — a book about an escaped slave who was forced to kill one of her babies — Trump uses one of Morrison’s quotes about slavery to warn women not to be “slaves” to their busy schedules: “returning calls, attending meetings [and] answering e-mails.” Read more (5/4/17)

follow @the-movemnt

are you drunk, mrs. lahey?

Originally posted by lovershub

a night out with the girls takes a surprising turn of events, and isaac’s not likely to deny his wife what she wants. (humor/smut)

Keep reading

Report: Trump’s pick for Dept. of Agriculture’s chief scientist is not a scientist

  • According to a report in ProPublica, Trump’s expected pick to be the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s chief scientist is not a scientist.
  • It’s Sam Clovis, a former Trump campaign adviser with no formal scientific qualifications.
  • Clovis has taken no graduate-level science courses, has published “almost no academic work” and is primarily known for hosting a conservative talk radio show in Iowa, according to ProPublica. Read more (5/15/17)

follow @the-future-now

4

MAIA WEEK — Day five: song lyrics

I had a one-way ticket to a place where all the demons go
Where the wind don’t change
And nothing in the ground can ever grow
No hope, just lies
And you’re taught to cry into your pillow
But I survived (x)

Witchcraft Authors to Avoid

None. And I’ll tell you why.

I know, I know. I’m a horrible person. How could I possibly agree with all of these horrible authors? But here’s the thing: You don’t have to–and shouldn’t–agree with an author 100% just because you read them. 

Instead of telling beginner witches not to read books or presses, I think we should tell them to read A LOT of source material instead, and read with a critical eye. Here are some things to look out for:

Pay attention to when it was published. Yes, I know Scott Cunningham’s info is old and not often followed anymore. And in ten years, my information will be outdated, and so will yours. Witchcraft trends change. Yarrow and rue used to be very popular beginner plants, because they are commonly found in many areas of North America. Nowadays, it’s more popular to use kitchen spices such as cinnamon and rosemary, and therefore these two herbs became outdated and are no longer used for what they were originally used for. This is something to keep in mind when reading a book from 1988.

(As a side note, different witches use different techniques and materials. I use bloodstone to connect with ancestors; I’ve never seen any other death witch do that. That doesn’t mean I’m wrong, it means I do things differently.)

Whenever you read a work, read critiques on it as well. Triumph of the Moon is well-written, and has a lot of acclaim! But it also has a lot of backlash–cultures the author glossed over, historical inaccuracies, biased claims, and the like. Read up on these critiques, even summaries. Hell, the amazon comments section and wikipedia articles even have some necessary critiques. I know tumblr can be an echo-chamber sometimes, but when you’re studying witchcraft, you shouldn’t remain in an echo-chamber. Read other sources. You’ll decide which one to agree with. 

Research the author. How you approach the work depends on how trustworthy the author is. If people have problems with them–if they’re historically inaccurate, or disregard other cultures–keep that in mind while you read. You don’t have to completely avoid an author just because they’re inconsiderate about some things, especially if that work is historically significant. I know Gerald Gardner was iffy at best, but I still recommend reading Witchcraft Today if you’re studying Wicca, because that book was a HUGE influence on modern day.

Don’t avoid a press entirely. I see a lot of people shitting on Llewellyn Worldwide. If you don’t know, that’s one of the biggest Pagan/Witchcraft publishing presses in the world, and they’ve been around for a long time. For those who aren’t familiar with how publishing works, there are two things to know about presses. (1) It is not the press’s job to fact-check people for inaccuracies; it’s the author’s. Especially in big presses, editors and curators are there to make sure the book is readable and sells. That’s it. (2) Presses often like to change their footprint. This means that they like to publish things that haven’t been published before, or, if their last book got shit on by the community, they’ll want to find an author who’s better. Hence, the quality of authorship varies in a press. So there’s no need to flat-out avoid presses.

Read with an open mind. These books are here for us to learn. They’re even here for us to learn what NOT to do, or what we don’t want as a witch. You should be disagreeing. You should be questioning. You should be asking other peoples’ opinions on the subject. Because at the end of the day, your craft is your own, and you want to make it as uniquely “you” as possible. 

To clarify, I’m not here to disregard anyone’s opinions of certain works. It is my opinion that people should form their own opinions of works, and learn from them. Especially beginners.

Thanks for your time. Have a good one ♡^▽^♡

across these pages

rating: e | words: 6,419 | chapters: 1

a sequel to between each beat are words unsaid

*****

“Here,” John says almost as soon as Sherlock’s settled next to him. “I wanted to give you something special today. Something important. And I, uh, I think it is.” He says it with a little shrug, a tiny bit of doubt creeping in.

“It is,” Sherlock reassures him, and John huffs out a laugh.

“You don’t even know what it is yet.”

*****

After the reception ends, John and Sherlock exchange wedding gifts. 

2

BOOKS READ IN 2016: the hating game by sally thorne

I have a theory. Hating someone feels disturbingly similar to being in love with them. I’ve had a lot of time to compare love and hate, and these are my observations.
Love and hate are visceral. Your stomach twists at the thought of that person. The heart in your chest beats heavy and bright, nearly visible through your flesh and clothes. Your appetite and sleep are shredded. Every interaction spikes your blood with adrenaline, and you’re in the brink of fight or flight. Your body is barely under your control. You’re consumed, and it scares you.

You know, I’ve received enough notes and asks in response to recent posts that I’m just going to address this one separately: when I’ve been grumping about webcomic scheduling woes, I do not, in fact, mean Homestuck.

Compared to its peers, Homestuck was published extraordinarily quickly for a work of its length. Similarly, the so-called “Gigapause” is by no means exceptional as webcomic hiatuses go.

Y’all are talking like surviving a year off is some sort of Herculean feat.

There are comics - currently updating ones, even! - where we’ve been waiting the better part of two decades for the author to get to the goddamn point.

Some of those plot threads have been dangling longer than many of those reading this post have been alive.

Like, I’m not trying to turn this into a “kids these days” thing, but please, don’t go acting like your fandom is the only one that knows what it is to suffer.

We know.

Oh, gods, we know.

Are You Passionate about Writing, Mental Health Advocacy or Psychology?

Our team is currently looking for more talented writers to add to the team. If writing and psychology is your passion, we’d love you to apply.

Send our editor with an email addressing the following questions:

1) A bit about yourself. (what you study; you can choose to include a picture of yourself).

2) Your goals and aspirations.

3) What do you hope to gain from writing with us?

4) Writing portfolio or published work you can share with us as links.

5) Your availability for the next 4 months. Are you able to do 1 article a week and help pitch topics to our editors?

Here’s what you get out from this:

1) Build your writing portfolio.

2) Reference

3) Adding your voice on something that matters to an audience of over 1 million +

4) Compensation if you’ve been publishing with us for a while (3 or more articles) aka. Contributor -> Staff Writer’s Position

Send us an email here:

writing@psych2go.net

Deadline: May 10th! Looking forward to connect!

We will start by learning more about you and then getting you to pitch topics you would like to write for the website!

a happy realization!

Just about all the writing advice about getting into traditional publishing has started with, Write a damn book and then worry about starting a career. Just get a book done without worrying about if it’s publishable or not. GET SOMETHING DONE.

And I’ve always been bad about the ‘get something done’ part. I’ve got a tendency to self-sabotage and self-doubt and generally take every bit of advice about how hard it is to get published to mean YOU WILL NEVER BE PUBLISHED. 

Back to the ‘write a book already’ advice. I’ve been feeling guilty that I still want to prioritize finishing IADM over starting original work, because while I love fandom and am so grateful for all its feedback and support, I also want to be traditionally published. I’ve written 60,000 words for the story already and it’s probably at least 20,000 words away from being completed. That’s so much time I could have spent on writing a story about hagfish to be published in some literary magazine with a circulation of twenty-five people, all of whom want to be published by the magazine. 

BUT WAIT. 60,000 words? That’s novel-length. If I finish IADM, that is my FIRST NOVEL plunked down and out of the way. I can look at it and say, “Sath, you have already written a novel and you are ready to do more.” It’s not even a particularly SHORT novel - I’m over the 200 book page mark already. I can actually do the thing I’ve wanted to do since I was about 9 years old or so! I CAN DO THE THING. 

So y’know what? NO MORE GUILT. I am doing big important author stuff by working on IADM! I AM GUD AUTHOR. I am PUMPED UP. 

*flexes wristbrace*