this is a good argument

kariproductions  asked:

you know it's kinda weird how people still give the you can't write this character because you'r not insert race\gender\sexuality\religion argument it's not a good one it's actually a terrible and dumb one and it can bite the person who say's it in the ass

Yeah, I hate it when people say shit like that, but then later complain about it not being diverse enough

anonymous asked:

What is a good, logical argument for when an Anti says "but Fetus is Latin for child..."?

The Latin meaning of a word doesn’t actually matter…how is that even relevant to the way medical professionals and scientists use the term?

-Kyoung

anonymous asked:

super late for this but your kanade giving maria advice post, i died and just imagined now all advice must go through genjuro because he's kanade's actual dad (and best dad) and has heard it all before and gives way better flirting advice because there's romance shoehorned into all his action movies. que grumbling about kids today not appreciating a good plot without romance and maria watching the classics with him

g od i love this and i had a pretty fun thought on it. first off i wondered how to get around the problem of the fact that shoehorned romance like this is usually Bad Bad Advice. genjuuro is too good to think “argue with a girl for six scenes and then mid-argument kiss her to shut her up” is good advice

but genjuuro does know tsubasa really well. maria knows he knows tsubasa really well. however tsubasa doesn’t know tsubasa really well, and maria is having trouble getting tsubasa’s attention and “hey i think we like each other let’s date, you don’t ‘not deserve to love’ i want to love you”

so maria really awkwardly and indirectly asks him how to ask out tsubasa, and he pretends to not get it and puts a big friendly hand on her shoulder and says he has some training for her. maria is too awkward to say she doesn’t need training so she goes along with it like when you try to tell your friend’s mom what you want for lunch and she mishears and you eat something you don’t like because it feels awkward and rude to correct her afterwards

training of course is just watching a movie. if i knew more movies i might have an idea of one but i’m sure there’s a movie out there with a battle couple on mutual footing. the big deal is like after the final battle or something, still sweaty and injured and tired, they confess/kiss. i guess like pacific rim but that wasn’t explicitly romantic

so maria doesn’t know why they just watched that, and genjuuro asks her what she learned
“how to…fight alongside tsubasa?”
genjuuro grabs her by both shoulders seriously. “be direct! right there, when the tension is high! take her attention by force and let her know how you really feel!”
and maria just =O because this whole time she thought he didn’t know this was about her girly romance feelings
of course genjuuro knows about girly romance feelings. he was there at the peak of tsubasa and kanade’s lovestruck teenager phase. hibiki and miku and kirika and shirabe are always around. maria is bad at hiding her feelings and she doesn’t look too different from any of them

so maria thanks him and maybe they watch a couple more movies so she can spend time bonding with her new uncle/brother-in-law. maria calls tsubasa out to spar, she won’t do this when like the noise is a real threat or something. calls a break, and as is flustered as anyone else with a heartbeat would be if they were on the receiving end of tsubasa attacking them while wearing workout clothes and sweating

maria doesn’t really build up she just kisses her. thankfully for maria she was right that tsubasa liked her and was oblivious to the reciprocation, because she wasn’t supposed to be That direct. tsubasa is mostly confused at how sudden it was when she somehow had no idea. and then maria needs a moment to lay on the floor and burn while she processes that tsubasa agreed to date her

The 9 Elements of a VILLAIN

If we’re being honest, one character is always the most fun to develop when you’re writing a new story. It must be the main character, right? The person you’re going to follow throughout the story, the one that means the most to you?

Nope. It’s the villain.

Villains are just FUN. You get to creep into the darkest corners of your writer brain and conjure up the most unashamedly detestable human being you possibly can. 

This is how we look when we begin creating a villain. 

But sometimes, it can be difficult to to make sure they’re fully believable humans. So here are the nine elements that have helped me out when developing these terrible people … 

1) Hero’s Shadow:

The relationship between the main character and the villain is the most important one in the story, because it is the source of all conflict. Without the villain causing trouble, the main character wouldn’t have the chance to be a hero. Without that trouble, the main character’s weaknesses wouldn’t be pressured, which means they couldn’t change. The villain is a condensed and magnified embodiment of the inner weakness that the hero is battling. They’re the SHADOW of hero, the example of what will happen if the main character goes down the wrong path. Both are facing the same problem in different ways. For example Darth Vader and Luke.  

2) Conflict Strategy:  

In the pursuit of stopping the hero from achieving their goal, the villain is going to attack them on 1) a personal relationship level 2) a societal level and 3) an inner level. They’re going to attack the people around them, they’re going to cause consequences for the community surrounding them, they’re going to get into their head and plague them. Because the hallmark of a villain is that they’re the person who’s perfectly suited to attack the hero’s greatest weakness. Villains should have a distinct set of tactics to destroy the main character, on at least two levels. 

3) Flaws: 

This one’s expected. Of course a villain has flaws, it’s in the job description. But flaws do not equate to ‘He kicks turtles every morning before breakfast’ or 'His favorite hobby is butterfly stomping’ or, more within the realm of possibility, “He wants to kill the hero”. These are evil actions, NOT flaws. A lot of villains, particularly in movies, will be given horrible things to do without any explanation for WHY they do them. And it’s pretty easy to give them reasons: just give them human weaknesses! That’s it. Whether the actions they take are as small as theft or as big as blowing up a planet, these actions stem from recognizable HUMAN FLAWS. So like a main character, a villain needs mental and moral flaws.  

Yup, even Maleficent has human flaws. And she’s a dragon part of the time. 

4) Counter Goal: 

All characters exist because they want something. And what do villains want? To get whatever the main character wants (for very different reasons), to stop them from reaching their goal, or another goal that directly conflicts with the hero’s goal. As long as that big tangible thing they want locks hero and villain in battle, you’re good. Think 101 Dalmatians: Cruella and the good guys are fighting over the puppies.  

5) Surface Motivations:  

Why is it that villains always have a team of followers? Because villains never outright state their true motivations. They always have a cover story, and that cover will paint them as righteous. Villains want to look like the good guy. So their real Hidden Motivations are defended by twisting perceptions of Good & Evil, by portraying evil acts in a positive light, by indulging their followers selfish emotions and desire to feel like “one of the good guys. " 

Take Gothel for example: she’s a loving mother who wants to protect her daughter from all the world’s darkness. (Sure you do, Flynn stabber.)  

Surface Motivations never stand up to logical scrutiny and a functioning moral compass, but giving your bad guy a compelling argument against your good side always makes things more interesting, which brings us to …

6) Counter Statement:

The main character needs to learn some kind of truth that will enable them to fix their lives, overcome their weaknesses, banish their ghosts. It’s whatever statement about "how to live a better life” you want to prove with your story. Your villain has other ideas. They don’t agree with that statement, have other beliefs about living life well, and represent an argument against it. For example, Voldemort: “there is no good and evil, there is only power, and those too weak to seek it." 

Although your argument isn’t very convincing, Voldy. I mean, you’re living in the back of some guy’s head.

7) Characterization: 

This is everything on the surface of the villain. The way they speak, the way they look, the way they act, their role in life, their status and power. This is the facade they project for the world to see, a calculated effort to control how they are perceived. This is closely connected to that surface want, because that surface is what they wish people to believe about them. Over time, the reader and the other characters are going to be able to see through this mask and see what it conceals. My favorite Disney example of this is Mother Gothel: on the surface she’s this bubbly mom who loves Rapunzel and wants to protect her from the harshness of the world. 

You can think of this as the text … 

8) Hidden Motivation: 

And this is the subtext. That surface motivation they want the world to believe is a mask concealing their true motivation, which is always rooted in their flaws,  selfishness, and skewed beliefs. 

9) Ghosts, Justification, Self-Obsession: 

These three are closely related, so they get counted together.
Like main characters, villains have GHOSTS: events from their backstories that knocked their worldviews out of alignment, that marked the beginning of their weaknesses, that haunt them still. Because these happened, the originally benign person allowed themselves to turn into someone who could occupy the job of "villain” in a story. Usually, these events are genuine misfortunes and are worthy of sympathy, just like the ghosts of a main character. Think of Voldemort growing up in an orphanage talking to snakes.

BUT! When it comes to ghosts, the major difference between a hero and a villain is HOW THEY DEAL with these unpleasant past events. Both have suffered, but react to suffering in very different ways. A villain will be consumed by these events, obsessed with the real (or imagined) persecution or disadvantage they’ve endured, convinced that all personal responsibility is nullified by their status of injured party. Past tragedies become a talisman that grants immunity from decency. 

This scene from A Series of Unfortunate Events sums it up.  An adult makes an excuse for a terrible person by saying he had a terrible childhood. And Klaus replies: 

Yes, maybe they’ve both lived through tragedy. But THE KIDS aren’t hurting others because of it. 

Because villains, who are constantly victimizing heroes, are completely convinced that THEY are the true victims here. No matter what they do, no matter what they are, they blame everything on that ghost, whether it was another person, society, or circumstances. And later they blame the hero, who they see as the REAL villain. For example, Frollo from The Hunchback of Notre Dame:  

“It’s not my fault, I’m not to blame”

So! WHY are villains like this?

SELF-OBSESSION! Yup, villains spend an unhealthy amount of time thinking about themselves and their plights and their plots. Think of any villain and it’s not hard to see the inherent narcissism behind everything they do. Like willingness to take action is the nonnegotiable trait of a main character, self-obsession is the trait that all villains seem to share. 

So! Developing villains in this way has worked out for me so far. If it looks like it might be helpful for you, give it a try.

And in the spirit of creating someone to torment our main characters and ruin their lives, here’s one more maniacal laugh for the road:

scutellatebooted  asked:

Hi Doc! Love reading your blog, I found you first through the Lucifer story (reminded me of a friend of mine actually) and then again through your mermaid post and have been hanging around ever since. I looked thru your archive but didn't find this question so hopefully it hasn't been asked before: what is it about horse anatomy that makes their legs so (seemingly) fragile? You'd think being as big as they are, they'd be more all-around solid. Thanks for reading, have a good one!

The horse, Equus caballus, is one of my favorite arguments against Intelligent Design. I’ve spoken before about why I no longer see them, but even as a student I would wonder why and how this species existed when there were apparently so many things that could go wrong with its own anatomy, especially next to something tough like a trusty cow.

I don’t know how it’s possible to believe in a benevolent, loving, wise creator when creatures like the horse come to exist.

So I’m going to use your question as an excuse to write a post that had been on my mind for a while:

Things That Are Wrong With Horses

The basic structure of a horse has a few significant design flaws.

  1. Cannot vomit. This means that anything which would make another species sick enough to vomit results in a horse getting s distended stomach and colic, where the stomach can rupture and the horse can die. Also means symptoms of illness are hidden longer
  2. The large bowel (hind gut) of the horse is fricking huge, but can actually displace itself and bend around the wrong way, resulting in obstruction, colic and death without surgical intervention. This can commonly happen after exertion (splenic contraction) and giving birth. Colic due to nephrosplenic entrapment is particularly common after the horse has an adrenaline release, which causes the spleen to temporarily contract, and this seems like a poor design to risk death every time you spook or go for a fast run, especially in a species known for spooking and running fast.
  3. Giving birth is a fast and explosive affair in the horse. The whole pushing business should be over and  done with in about 20 minutes, however this assumes that everything is lined up just right for a normal delivery. Foals are all long legs and necks, which are easy to get tangled or bent around the wrong way. A mare is strong enough to push her foal’s feet through her uterine wall, which is death all round.
  4. Speaking of strength, sometimes horses will kick each other when they have attitude, and they can do so with enough strength to rupture each other’s spleens.
  5. When galloping most horses, best studied in thoroughbreds because they are made to gallop on a regular basis, horses routinely bash their diaphragm with such force against their liver that their liver bruises.
  6. Galloping also often makes their lungs bleed. That’s why racehorses have their head held up after a race, so you don’t see any blood come out their nose and disqualify them. Even horses that you don’t see bleed have evidence of pulmonary bleeding after a gallop if you scope them.
  7. Their leg bones are actually pretty damn tough, but the ends are spindly little things compared to the mass of musculature up top. Their legs are subjected to huge biomechanical forces when a horse runs which can often subject them to ligament damage and lameness. A fractured leg bone can heal like any other, but if a horse can’t bear weight evenly on all four legs for an extended period of time (eg after a fracture) then they are at risk of laminitis.
  8. Laminitis can cause the hoof to slough off. (Aaargh!) They can also get laminitis from eating a bit too well.
  9. Speaking of eating, they can also get colic (and risk death) from eating not enough fiber or the wrong sort of plants or from eating too much dirt.
  10. Oh, and just to mess with you, horses have a space in their head called a guttural pouch which seems to exist for no other reason as far as I can tell (okay, maybe it’s about heat regulation) other than to get fungal infections that eat through the exposed artery and cause the horse to die from blood loss through it’s nose.

And Bonus: Exquisite sensitivity to tetanus and vulnerability to Hendravirus

This list is by no means complete. I haven’t even touched on their anesthetics or drug reactions, but it’s a simple start.

feelbending  asked:

Thomas I hope you're okay with all the current drama, I personally believe that you did nothing wrong at all. You're always making sure you're inclusive and doing the right thing, sorry your fandom's exploded :(

Hey!! Yeah, I’m doing fine!! Please don’t worry, these sorts of things happen sometimes and it gets very hard to address and handle all at once! I have made mistakes though, so please don’t feel like you have to defend all that I do, that’s not your responsibility, and I’ve been doing what I can to make sure things were addressed!

There was a piece of art of myself that was posted a while back that I put under a Read More and tagged nsfw because it was, and it was revealed later, after the artists’ bio was updated, that they were not of appropriate age, and that was a complete mistake on my part to make sure! I’ve always made a point to clarify, if people asked me, that if they were to do any nsfw art of me and submit it, that they should be of appropriate age to be doing so. My tumblr started as a personal blog and I thought tagging things appropriately would be enough, but this occurrence absolutely made me rethink how my blog was laid out and how much more consideration I needed to be putting into my blog and who was viewing it, so I made a public apology for it yesterday (in the #TSask) and decided to restructure my blog in order to make sure this never happens again. Posts I deemed too questionable, I have removed and if they ever go up again, they would be going up on a sideblog of some kind. I absolutely appreciate those who brought this up to me. I should have been the one to catch it, and I need to be far more vigilant about what I post from here on out!

There was also the post I responded to about why I felt it right to include asexuals and aromantics of any combination in the community. I’ve been having many really awesome and respectful conversations with people on both sides of this argument and its been really good, for me and I think for a lot of them, to gain understanding on where we’re both coming from. I am so grateful to those who came to me and got to discuss with me incredibly important things to remember and respect: the early struggles of the trans and gay community, the Stonewall Riots, the travesties and systemic oppression that still happen around the world today that need to be fought. We also got to discuss issues like arranged marriages that affect people on all areas of the spectrum. We talked about different demographics of the community and where they would like to stand or not stand. And the importance of limited resources made available to people of the community were discussed with me as well. I’ve been so absolutely grateful to those of you who came to me and are still coming to me to talk through these things, because I don’t claim to know everything, and many of the discussions were ended wonderfully respectfully. In the end, obviously, I have no, or maybe just really little, say in what defines the community. In what I say, I am absolutely making no attempt to prioritize people over another, because there are some extreme things that need to be fought. I can only be in control of myself and who I deem to be valid and who I would like to offer my support. I truly am trying to put myself in everyone’s shoes and see where they’re coming from. And I am so grateful so many of you came to me so respectfully to talk! That’s amazing! That, I think, is the most optimal form of discussion for people on both sides. I don’t like seeing anyone on either side attacking each other, and it’s so devastating to see so much of it. 

I truly hope this helps bring clarity for those of you who were confused or looking for an update! The internet can be a confusing place and the truth can be mangled, but I am doing everything I can to make sure I amend for any bad decisions and hear you all out as best as I can. I’m only human, and I truly do care about you and where you’re all coming from, so I hope you can all bear with me! 

the more I think about it, the less and less sense it makes for Terra to be one of the Darknesses in KH3 because like

in literally every moment after Xehanort possesses him we see Terra fighting back. in the Graveyard, in Radiant Garden, and now in darkness limbo as 0.2 showed us, ten years later, we always see Xehanort struggling to control him. why?

because he can’t.

at no point can he fully, 100% smother Terra’s influence.

the only time Xehanort and Terra seem to coexist “peacefully” is during the Apprentice-Xehanort arc – during which time their hearts were sealed and memories presumably lost.

and considering this series is constantly stressing how intelligent and farsighted Xehanort is I just can’t imagine he’s actually stupid enough to count Terra among his 13 when he knows full well by now that Terra is a force to be reckoned with. Terra would require far too much focus and effort to maintain a hold of, because a) IT DIDN’T WORK TWELVE YEARS AGO AND IT DIDN’T WORK TWO YEARS AGO SO WHY WOULD ANYTHING HAVE CHANGED, especially when b) we’ve seen that Terra’s only gotten stronger and more confident since BBS?? and c) I’ve said this before but I’ll say it again: Terra was impossible to control with Xehanort’s whole heart inside him. attempting to control him with only 1/13th of his heart is just? asking for failure? I mean really?? why don’t you just carry around a ticking time bomb while you’re at it man

7

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

(I feel like the argument stemmed from Black Hat being meaner than usual towards Flug because he’s frustrated at himself trying to understand his affectionate feelings, and Flug finally blows up about it)

everyone’s so worried about how ben solo just returning to the person he was before kylo ren would be “too easy” after all he’s done. how adopting that name would mean regression for the character and a lack of culpability for the things he did as kylo ren.

and I have to wonder, has it ever occurred to anyone that ben solo has never really existed at all? that there is no ben solo for him to return to? that there was never a time ben existed alone in his own mind, allowed to develop his own thoughts and view of the world outside of another’s manipulation and lies? that he never had the chance to develop into the person ben would have grown up to be, since snoke began grooming him long before even his adolescence?

how exactly, I have to ask, would ben building himself from the ground up be “too easy”? how would forcing him to do the tough and painful work of getting to know himself as himself equal regression for this character? how would becoming someone capable of understanding the moral weight of what he’s done to his galaxy and his family and himself be negating culpability for the things he’s done?

snoke didn’t give ben the chance to become someone new - he was molding him into kylo ren from the beginning.
and I can’t help feeling that ben reclaiming his name is an important step in defining himself for himself, for the first time ever.

Lame adaptations and sequels are always like, “how can Mina go back to her stifling Victorian marriage after her experience with the dark, seductive Dracula??”

Meanwhile, Mina marries her best friend, who she’s known since they were children, who she share common interests with, they build a home together, work as partners, make immense sacrifices for each other, support each other through their traumas.

Guys, a marriage isn’t stifling and restrictive just because two people… get along, I guess?

“Quickly men! Into formation!”

“Sir, what purpose does this formation serve? None of us is aiming with even a remote chance of hitting any possible enemies and we’re in serious danger of starting a forest fire.”

“Shut up Steve. It looks awesome.”


(Photo by @nicolasbruno on Instagram)

Enneagram: How to get along with the types.

Type 1

- Be responsible for yourself, so I don’t have to do that for you, too.
- I’m hard on myself. Assure me that I’m good, just the way I am.
- Tell me that you appreciate my advices.
- Be fair, and attentive, like I am.
- Apologize when you are wrong. This helps me forgive.
- Help me loosen up a bit, and teach me how to laugh at myself. But please, listen to my concerns first.

(Most common type among ISTJs, ESTJs, and INTJs)

Type 2

- Tell me you appreciate me. Be specific about why.
- Share your joy with me.
- Do care about my problem, even if I’m busy with yours.
- Let me know that I’m important and special to you.
- Please be gentle, even if you have to criticize me.
- In intimate relationships; assure me that you’re still interested in me.
- Remind me that you love me.
- Tell me I’m attractive, and you really like when people see us together.

(Most common type among ISFJs, ESFJs, ESFPs, INFJs, and ENFJs)

Type 3

- Leave me alone when I work.
- Please give me honest, but not critical feedback.
- Help me to organize, and to keep my environment neat.
- Don’t burden me with negative emotions.
- Tell me that you like being with me.
- Tell me that you’re proud of me and my achievements.

(Most common type among ESTJs, ENTJs, and ENFJs)

Type 4

- Give me compliments often. They mean a lot.
- Be a supportive friend, or partner. Help me to love others and to appreciate myself.
- Please keep the power of my intuition, and foresight in respect.
- Though I don’t always want people to cheer me up from my melancholy, sometimes you still have to bring back the light to my inner world.
- DON’T tell me, that I’m too sensitive, or I overreact something!

(Most common type among ISFPs, INFJs, and INFPs)

Type 5

- Please be independent, not a puppy.
- Talk shortly, and straightforwardly.
- I need to be alone to think.
- Remember, if I appear to be distant, or arrogant, that’s because I feel uncomfortable.
- Show me that you’re happy to see me, but don’t ever overact because that makes me doubt your honesty.
- If I have to repeat something I said, and I become irritated, that’s because it was hard to say for the first time even.
- Help me to avoid big parties, loud people, overheated emotions, and the violation of my privacy.

(Most common type among ISTPs, INTJs, and INTPs)

Type 6

- Be straightforward and honest with me.
- Pay attention to me.
- Please don’t condemn me for my worry.
- Let’s solve our problems together.
- Assure me that everything’s OK between us.
- Laugh, and joke around with me.
- Lead me gently to new experiences.
- Don’t overreact when I overreact something.

(Most common type among ISTJs, ESTJs, ISFJs, and ESFJs)

Type 7

- Give me company, kindness, and freedom.
- Have stimulating conversations, and laugh with me.
- Appreciate my ideas, and listen to my stories.
- Don’t try to change me. Accept me for who I am.
- Be independent. I don’t like babysitting others.
- Please don’t tell me what to do.

(Most common type among ESTPs, ENTPs, ESFPs, and ENFPs)

Type 8

- Stand up for yourself… and for me.
- Be confident, strong, and straightforward.
- Don’t talk behind my back and don’t abuse my trust.
- Dare to be vulnerable, and share your feelings with me. Notice, and admit that I have a delicate side, too.
- Give me space to be alone.
- Admit, and appreciate the things I do for you, but don’t try to dazzle me.
- I often talk passionately. Please don’t take it personally.
- When I rage, I break things, or I shout. Remember, this is how I work.

(Most common type among ESTPs, ENTJs, and ENTPs)

Type 9

- It’s not what you say, it’s the way you say it. I’m sensitive to pressure and expectations.
- I like being quiet and to serve, but don’t take advantage of me.
- Don’t interrupt me when I’m talking, not even when I digress a little.
- Give me enough time for decisions, and tasks. But you can push me gently.
- Ask, if something’s not clear.
- Please tell me, if you like me. It won’t go to my head.
- Hug me, and show me your emotions physically. This helps me to open up.
- I like a good conversation, but not an argument.
- Let me know, if I did or said something right.
- Laugh with me, and share your happiness with me.

(Most common type among ISTPs, INTPs, ISFPs and INFPs)

Writing Antagonists: (Aka, Your Villains and Bad Guys)

The antagonist is often either one of the most fun things to write, or the most dreaded. But either way, they are a key element of the story, and that cannot be ignored. So, let’s talk about how to make a really great antagonist.

You may have in the past met a writer or teacher or whomever who insists on using the words “protagonist and antagonist” over words like “hero and villain.” Personally, I am not so stingy about it, I feel that I know what you mean anyway so it doesn’t really matter- what there is a legitimate reason as to why you should at least try to think of your villain as your antagonist instead.

And that reason is connotation. Well, denotation too, really- villain and antagonist aren’t completely the same thing, but I’m bringing it down to connotation. 

Simply said, when you think of the word “villain”, you’ll think something like “that’s the bad guy in the story.” And when you think of the “antagonist”, you probably think “that’s a fancy word for villain, aka the bad guy in the story.”

But antagonist isn’t just a fancy word. It’s a fancy concept. It means “the guy that opposes the good guy.” That can be on any argument or view. When writing your antagonist is to remember that nothing is black/white, good/bad thinking, and that includes your antagonist.

Let’s map out the steps to making a complex villain- aka, an antagonist.

First, remember that your antagonist (usually) is a person, just like your protagonist. It might help to develop them outside of their intentions first, and put a person to the upcoming reputation.

Background:

Chances are, your antagonist didn’t just rise up out of the ground ready to kill. They came from somewhere. Your readers don’t even have to know everything about your antag’s backstory, but you do, if you want to really understand them. It often holds the key reason as to why your antagonist is where they are. The drive behind anger, revenge, change, or pleasing someone else can come from the events in their background.

Why do they hold the beliefs they hold? Were they raised that way? Were they taught by some mentor figure? Were they cover from a reality they couldn’t bear? Are they trying to please someone, or get revenge on someone who displeased them? The answer should be in their background.

Motives/Beliefs:

Remember, every villain is a hero in their own mind. They believe that what they are doing is necessary, even if they recognize that it is unpleasant. What are they fighting for? Why does it matter to them so much, that they are willing to overlook all the harm they do?

“The Greater Good”: This is one of the more common and understandable villain motives. They believe that what they are doing now is paving the way to a better future. But keep in mind that what your antag views as a “better future” may be very, very different than the average opinion. Maybe a “better future” for them is a genocidal purge or the world ending in flames. Who knows.

That’s not the only type of motive. Be creative. Work with the information you established in your character’s background to find the most reasonable motive.

Tipping Point:

This is going to be related to your background and motive in an interesting way. Think of your antagonist as a character who has already completed their Character Arc and reached a negative end. Look at the points of change on the character arc- the ones that push your character farther down their path. What are those events? Those are the tipping points that prompted your character towards becoming they way they are now- those key moments where your character had a choice, and they chose to become bitter, hateful, vengeful, cold, or other negative things.

These could be the deaths of loved ones, the promptings of a mentor, or a moment of injustice that made them realize that the world isn’t always kind.

Personality/Actions:

This is the part where you develop them outside of their intentions. How do they behave? 

It’s tempting to just say that your villain is a villain because they torture and kill people. But those are not the only things that make a villain a scary or serious threat. Some characters might jump to violence easier than others. Some might be more into psychological torment. Some might actually seem really charming or persuasive, which is frightening in it’s own way- they might actually be tricky enough to confuse you into making bad decisions on your own. Think about your character’s background again. What makes the most sense for them as a person?

Presentation:

This is how your antagonist comes across to others. Keep in mind that your reader and your other characters don’t know your antagonist like you do. How does this person present to the world? 

-Are they open to discussion/negotiation?

-Are they open about their intentions?

-How quick are they to violence?

-What are their methods of war?

-When you meet them, are they charismatic, quiet, charming, vulgar? Do they have a sense of humor, or are they stoic?

-Do they seem to enjoy what they are doing, or do they express regrets even as they do it?

Moral Complexity:

What are they willing to do to achieve their goals? Do they have weaknesses in their personal lives?

1. Do they have noble ends behind their controversial means?

2. Is there a line even they won’t cross?

3. Do they have someone/something that they care about?

4. Do they prefer to do the killing/torturing etc themselves or do they just give the order?

Remember that if your antagonist does have any of these moral weaknesses, they are not going to want to show it. One has to keep up intimidating appearances, after all. 

Speaking of appearances…

Appearance:

This part is here to tell you what not to do. There are certain appearances that are getting really old with villains.

1. Dressing in all black. Why do they even do that? It’s time to stop associating black with “bad” and white with “good”. It just isn’t like that, so stop making villains all dark and stuff.

2. Scars. I think scars are pretty cool, don’t get me wrong. But if there is no relevant reason for it to be there, don’t talk about it all the time. That goes for all characters, not just villains. Like the color black, scars are not just a villain thing. Everyone has them. Don’t associate them with “bad.”

3. Sexy. I get the idea that making a villain attractive makes them harder to hate, but that can be kind of a cop out of actual complexity. Again, if there is no legitimate reason to make your villain sexy, then don’t. It’s not necessary.

4. Ugly. I hesitate to call any traits inherently ugly, but if you’re striving to make your character unpleasant looking just because they’re bad, then once again, you are associating feature=evil, which is not creative at best and seriously socially harmful at worst. 

Basically, your villains should be just as diverse as anyone else. You don’t need stereotypes to make them scary. Sometimes it’s scarier than anything else to just have an average person. It sort of adds to the idea that anyone could be a villain. And that’s pretty frightening.

Key Point:

- Complicate your villains. They’re not just Evil McEvilpants. 

That’s it for now, but like anything else in writing, antagonists have a lot of possibility and exceptions. But that was your basic rundown on the things to consider when making a complicated antagonist. 

~Penemue

“without the electoral college people in the cities would determine the winner!!!”

great!!!! that’s where most people are!!!! who exactly is supposed to determine the winner then if not the majority of people?? the cows in montana?? lizards in the grand canyon? empty fields in kansas? i have yet to hear a good argument for this system that pertains to the 21st century